Browse results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 10,267 items for :

  • Literary Relations x
  • Search level: All x
Clear All
Author: Gohar Muradyan
Greek myths were, to some extent, familiar to medieval Armenian authors, mainly through translations of late classical and early Christian writings; they also appear in original works, but this knowledge was never profound or accurate. Both translators and Armenian authors, as well as later scribes, while translating, renarrating and copying short mythical stories, or mentioning or just alluding to them often related the stories and the familiar or unfamiliar names occurring in them correctly, but sometimes they made mistakes, chiefly corrupting names not well-known to them, and sometimes, even details of the plot.
This is the first study which brings together the references to ancient Greek myths (154 episodes) in medieval Armenian literature by including the original Armenian and Greek (if extant) text and translation. With appendices listing the occurrences of Greek gods, their Armenian equivalents, images, altars, temples, and rites, the Aesopian fables and the Trojan war.
Gender and Nation in Spain and Italy in the Long Nineteenth Century
In the long nineteenth century, dominant stereotypes presented people of the Mediterranean South as particularly passionate and unruly, therefore incapable of adapting to the moral and political duties imposed by European civilization and modernity. This book studies, for the first time in comparative perspective, the gender dimension of a process that legitimised internal hierarchies between North and South in the continent. It also analyses how this phenomenon was responded from Spain and Italy, pointing to the coincidences and differences between both countries. Drawing on travel narratives, satires, philosophical works, novels, plays, operas, and paintings, it shows how this transnational process affected, in changing historical contexts, the ways in which nation, gender, and modernity were imagined and mutually articulated.
Swahili Poetry of Commitment by Ustadh Mahmoud Mau
The present volume is a pioneering collection of poetry by the outstanding Kenyan poet, intellectual and imam Ustadh Mahmmoud Mau (1952 - ) from Lamu island, once an Indian Ocean hub, now on the edge of the nation state. By means of poetry in Arabic script, the poet raises his voice against social ills and injustices troubling his community on Lamu. The book situates Mahmoud Mau’s oeuvre within transoceanic exchanges of thoughts so characteristic of the Swahili coast. It shows how Swahili Indian Ocean intellectual history inhabits an individual biography and writings while also portraying a unique African Muslim thinker and his poetry in the local language, which has so often been neglected as major site for critical discourse in Islamic Africa. The authors’ approaches highlight the relevance of local epistemologies as archives for understanding the relationship between reform Islam and local communities in contemporary Africa.
The selected poetry is clustered around the following themes: jamii: societal topical issues, ilimu: the importance of education, huruma: social roles and responsabilities, matukio: biographical events and maombi: supplications. Prefaced by Prof. Rayya Timamy (Nairobi University), the volume includes contributions by Jasmin Mahazi, Kai Kresse and Kadara Swaleh, Annachiara Raia and Clarissa Vierke.
Théorie littéraire et fragilité du divers
L’infini culturel est autour de nous, mais, comme l’horizon, il tend à fuir sous nos yeux. Il est sur les murs investis par le street art ; ou dans les toiles d’araignée auxquelles Tomás Saraceno a rendu homage ; ou dans les timbres-poste qui, comme savaient Walter Benjamin et Italo Calvino, sont des fenêtres ouvertes sur le monde.
Quelle que soient ses manifestations, l’infini nous engage à considérer l’extraordinaire diversité de la planète.
Face à lui, que faire, en littérature ?
Rester humble, par exemple, et formuler des hypothèses adéquates. Tenter de déjouer les asymétries qui empêchent les uns et les autres de s’exprimer partout dans de bonnes conditions. Revoir les fondements de la world literature et se mettre en résonance avec une culture authentiquement planétaire.

Cultural infinity is around us, but, like the horizon, it tends to flee before our eyes. It is on the walls invested by street art; or in the cobwebs to which Tomás Saraceno paid homage; or in postage stamps which, as Walter Benjamin and Italo Calvino knew, are windows to the world.
Whatever its manifestations, the infinite challenges us to consider the extraordinary diversity of the planet.
Facing him, what to do, in literature?
Remain humble, for example, and formulate adequate hypotheses. Try to thwart the asymmetries that prevent each other from expressing themselves everywhere in good conditions. Review the foundations of world literature and resonate with an authentically planetary culture.
Volume Editors: Mabel Moraña and Ana Gallego Cuiñas
Market relations are changing not only the distribution and promotion of literary works but also their content, their language, and their social and political function. This book penetrates the intricacies of literary production, circulation and reception, focusing on some of the most original and representative authors of today such as Roberto Bolaño, Gabriela Cabezón Camara, Yuri Herrera, and Irmgard Emmelhainz, among others. The book also illuminates on the “materialitity” of literature and the strategies of literary marketing: festivals, book fairs, digitalization, and translation. Globalization and regional particularisms meet, then, in the symbolic territories of the literary world, and expose their dynamics and intrinsic negotiations.
Volter Kilpi in Orbit Beyond (Un)translatability
One of the hottest battles emerging out of the theoretical and methodological collisions between Comparative Literature and Translation Studies—especially on the battleground of World Literature—has to do with translatability and untranslatability. Is any translation of a great work of literature not only a lamentable betrayal but an impossibility? Or is translation an imperfect but invaluable tool for the transmission of works and ideas beyond language barriers?
Both views are defensible; indeed both are arguably commonsensical. What Douglas Robinson argues in Translating the Monster, however, is that both are gross oversimplifications of a complex situation that he calls on Jacques Derrida to characterize as “the monster.”
The Finnish novelist Robinson takes as his case study for that monstrous rethinking is Volter Kilpi (1874-1939), regarded by scholars of Finnish literature as Finland’s second world-class writer—the first being Aleksis Kivi (1834-1872). Kilpi’s modernist experiments of the 1930s, especially his so-called Archipelago series, beginning with his masterpiece, In the Alastalo Parlor (1933), were forgotten and neglected for a half century, due to the extreme difficulty of his narrative style: he reinvents the Finnish language, to the extent that many Finns say it is like reading a foreign language (and one contemporary critic called it the “Mesopotamian language … of a half-wit”). That novel has been translated exactly twice, into Swedish and German. Translating the Monster also gives the English-speaking reader an extended taste of the novel in English—en route to a series of reframings of the novel as allegories of translation and world literature.
During the 13th and 14th centuries, medieval Castile produced some of the liveliest, most sophisticated vernacular reworkings of narratives inherited from classical and late antiquity, including those about Alexander the Great, the Trojan War, or Apollonius of Tyre. This study recovers the overlooked tradition of the Castilian romances of antiquity, showing how these works offered a nuanced reflection of the relationship between cultural memory, the media through which memory is shaped and transmitted, and Castile’s imperial ambitions. Clara Pascual-Argente restores a genre of great cultural and political importance to its rightful place in Castilian and European literary history.
This is the first complete study of the relationship between Retranslation and Reception. Although many translation scholars have cited Reception Theory in their work, this is the first systematic study of its relationship to Retranslation. The book starts from the hypothesis that frequent retranslations of the same literary text into the same language may be indicative of its impact in the target culture. The volume encompasses both theory and practical analysis of Retranslation and Reception as mutually dependent concepts. The sixteen chapters relate the translations analysed to their socio-historical contexts in order to assess the impact that they have had on the target culture in terms of the reception of the authors studied, and also explore the relationship that may exist between the appearance of new translations and historical, social or cultural changes.