Browse results

Author: Caralie Cooke
This book reads the Joseph novella alongside contemporary trauma novels in order to analyze the loss of the assumptive world of the writer and readers of the Joseph novella. In turn, it re-thinks trauma theory in light of the “religious,” understood as the belief in and relationship to a God who orders the universe. Thus, this book argues that when we read the Joseph novella alongside contemporary trauma novels, we see a story written by people trying to reconstruct their assumptive world after the shattering of their old one, highlighting the significance of the religious dimension in trauma theory.
This book makes the attempt to wed reason and the poetic. The tool for this attempt is Rational Poetic Experimentalism (RPE), which is introduced and explored in this book. According to RPE, it makes sense to look for poetic elements in human reality (including reason), outside of the realm of imaginative literature. Provocatively, RPE contends that philosophy’s search for truth has not been a great success so far. So, why not experiment with philosophical concepts and look for thought-provoking ideas by employing the principles of RPE, instead of fruitlessly searching for truths using conventional methods?
Author: Tom Brass
The focus of this volume is on political discourse about the pattern and desirability of economic development, and how/why historical interpretations of social phenomena connected to this systemic process alter. It is a trajectory pursued here with reference to the materialism of Marxism, via the mid-nineteenth century ideas about race, through the development decade, the ‘cultural turn’, debates about modes of production and their respective labour regimes, culminating in the role played by immigration before and after the Brexit referendum. Also examined is the trajectory followed by travel writing, and how many of its core assumptions overlap with those made in the social sciences and development studies. The object is to account for the way concepts informing these trajectories do or do not alter.

Abstract

This article analyses the figure of Celia, questioning the description that emerges from the main account of Beckett’s early women. This account, originally developed by Bryden (1993), claims that women in Beckett’s early prose are represented through the filter of the male gaze, and are constructed in opposition to, and as an obstacle for, the male hero. This article argues that, in Murphy, the mechanisms set to reduce Celia to a stereotypical Woman, are foregrounded, and hence disrupted, by the presence of several contradicting perspectives, including Celia’s own perspective.

In: Samuel Beckett Today / Aujourd'hui

Abstract

This article explores the way in which modern productions of Happy Days (by Sarah Frankcom and Katie Mitchell) can be read as a reappraisal of Winnie’s predicament in the light of climate change and disaster. By viewing the mound as both home and tomb, this exploration of the play in performance examines the way domestic rituals form part of her survival strategies. By utilising the critical framework of phenomenology and material object theory alongside environmental and sociological studies, this paper aims to further our understanding of the female body and its relationship with the environment in moments of crisis that lead to displacement, due to disaster, ageing or homelessness.

In: Samuel Beckett Today / Aujourd'hui
Free access
In: Samuel Beckett Today / Aujourd'hui

Abstract

This paper focuses on an adaptation of Beckett’s Waiting for Godot in the Muslim context of Pakistan. Firstly, it looks at previous performances of the play with female actors. Secondly, it examines why female characters are introduced in the adaptation, which is strikingly opposite to Beckett’s idea of characterization in Waiting for Godot. Thirdly, it explores how such alteration is significant in the context of the Muslim culture of Pakistan. Finally, the play thus adapted for a local audience is read in a political light.

Open Access
In: Samuel Beckett Today / Aujourd'hui
Author: James Baxter

Abstract

This article explores the curious interface between Beckett’s writing and the male-orientated magazine culture of the United States. Throughout the 1960s, Beckett would be solicited for articles by Esquire (advertised as ‘The Magazine for Men’) including an unlikely invitation to cover the 1968 Democratic Convention. By 1969, a write-up of Kenneth Tynan’s Oh! Calcutta! (for which Beckett would contribute the opening skit) would feature prominently in the October issue of Playboy magazine. Despite his often-perplexed reactions, this article suggests that the appeal of Beckett to commercial men’s magazines may help to situate the author within mid-century discourses around sexual freedom and ‘hip’ masculinity.

In: Samuel Beckett Today / Aujourd'hui
Author: Pim Verhulst

Abstract

This article analyzes Beckett’s radio plays Embers and Words and Music in the context of the BBC Third Programme and its cultural politics, to argue that they engage with the censorship of his work, especially when it comes to sexual matters, in hitherto unexplored ways. While Embers both challenges and eludes censorship by means of ambiguous or abstract phrasing, Words and Music builds on this strategy and thematizes self-censorship through music. This connects Beckett’s radio plays from the 1950s and 1960s to earlier works from the 1930s like Murphy and Dream of Fair to Middling Women, widening the censorship debate.

In: Samuel Beckett Today / Aujourd'hui
Author: Katherine Weiss

Abstract

In Samuel Beckett’s Happy Days, the protagonist Winnie recalls being gawked at by an offensive passerby. Despite the pain she endures from this crude fellow whose looking represents the patriarchal gaze, the aging Winnie seeks attention from her husband and the audience. In her need for attention, that is to-be-looked-at, Winnie reveals that she is not meek. She fondly recollects men from her past and with pleasure looks at a pornographic postcard she takes from her partner, Willie. Beckett’s play complicates the patriarchal gaze with its exploration of the female gaze—a gaze that reveals Winnie’s desire for sexual intimacy.

In: Samuel Beckett Today / Aujourd'hui