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Les études réunies dans ce volume explorent la question de l’autorité de l’écriture spirituelle féminine au XVIe siècle en France. L’enjeu est de comprendre l’émergence spectaculaire du discours religieux écrit par des femmes en langue française à cette période. En s’appuyant sur les textes littéraires, les discours polémiques et les mémoires, les autrices et auteurs évaluent sur l’espace d’un siècle élargi les contradictions, les difficultés et les soutiens que rencontrent les initiatives féminines chrétiennes. Ils abordent notamment les sources de l’innutrition chrétienne, la question des modèles, la circulation et la réception de ces écrits, les foyers de l’autorité féminine et les marques textuelles de cette autorité, pour ouvrir de nouvelles perspectives sur l’écriture spirituelle féminine au début de l’époque moderne.

This book provides new perspectives on the question of the authority of female spiritual writing in sixteenth-century France. This topic is crucial for understanding the emergence of religious discourse written by women in French language during this period. Drawing on literary texts, polemical discourses, and memoirs, the essays by leading scholars explore the contradictions, difficulties, and support on the part of men for Christian women's initiatives over the course of an extended century. In particular, they address the sources of Christian thought about women, the question of models, the circulation and reception of Renaissance feminine writings, and the textual marks of this authority in order to open up new perspectives on feminine spiritual writing in the early modern era.
Serendipities in the Production of Danish Islams
Author: Jesper Petersen
In the last decade a number of women-led mosques have emerged in Europe and North America. In The Making of a Mosque with Female Imams Jesper Petersen documents the serendipitous, yet predictable, emergence of the Mariam Mosque in Copenhagen. The study first demonstrates that individuals’ facing the unpredictable plays a decisive role in social processes. This leads to an investigation of how serendipities are erased when narratives are erected retrospectively in the form of commodified products, autobiographical narratives, and research. Furthermore, Petersen conceptualizes non-Muslims’ theological productions of Islam – Islam without the worship of Allah, so to speak – and demonstrates how this influences Muslim productions of Islam.
Les princesses ottomanes à l’aune du pouvoir (XVe-XVIIIe s.)
Author: Juliette Dumas
Les femmes ottomanes n’auraient pas leur place en politique ; recluses dans leur harem, elles passeraient leur temps en distractions superficielles ou en intrigues pernicieuses : tel est l’héritage de l’orientalisme et de l’historiographie traditionnelle. Loin de ces poncifs, cet ouvrage propose une plongée dans les cadres institutionnels et sociaux ottomans, qui commandent le spectre des interactions sociales et politiques des femmes de la cour ottomane, en prenant pour champ d’étude une figure largement ignorée de l’historiographie : les filles de sang des souverains ottomans – les sultanes.

Ottoman women would have no place in politics; recluse in their harem, they would pass their time in superficial distractions or in pernicious intrigues: such is the heritage of Orientalism and traditional historiography. Far from these clichés, this work offers a dive into the Ottoman institutional and social frameworks, which govern the spectrum of social and political interactions of the women of the Ottoman court, taking as a field of study a figure largely ignored by historiography: the blood daughters of the Ottoman rulers – the sultanas.
Throughout his career, self-taught Scottish writer James Hogg (1770-1835) violated literary proprieties which discouraged the frank treatment of prostitution, infanticide, and the violence of war. Contemporary reviewers received Hogg’s bluntness rather fiercely because, in so doing, he questioned the ideologies of chastity, marriage and military masculinities that informed emerging discourses of the British Empire. This book reveals the strategic use that Hogg made of the marriage plot to challenge the civilising ideal of the motherly heroine as well as martial and sentimental masculinities which supported the discourse of a strong but tamed national vigour, thereby highlighting Hogg’s critical use of gender stereotypes in relation to norms of class and ethnicity when deconstructing this plot convention.
Volume Editors: Anna Kathryn Grau and Lisa Colton
This collection of seventeen essays newly identifies contributions to musical culture made by women before 1500 across Europe. You will learn about repertoire from such diverse locations as Iceland, Spain, and Italy, and encounter examples of musicianship from the gender-fluid professional musicians at the Islamicate courts of Syria to the nuns of Barking Abbey in England.
The book shows that women drove musical patronage, dissemination, composition, and performance, including within secular and ecclesiastical contexts, and also reflects on the reception of medieval women’s musical agency by both medieval poets and by modern recording artists.
Contributors are David Catalunya, Lisa Colton, Helen Dell, Annemari Ferreira, Rachel Golden, Gillian L. Gower, Anna Kathryn Grau, Carissa M. Harris, Louise McInnes, Lisa Nielson, Lauren Purcell-Joiner, Megan Quinlan, Leah Stuttard, Claire Taylor Jones, Melissa Tu, Angelica Vomera, and Anne Bagnall Yardley.
This volume explores issues and themes related to violence against women. It is distinctive in two ways. First, the editors have convened an international cohort of contributing scholars, whose assessment of the pervasiveness and urgency of the problems and their proposals for solutions derives from their pneumatology: their theology of the Holy Spirit. Second, this book represents quite simply the first sustained effort to bring together in one volume Pentecostal voices from a variety of academic disciplines, ecclesial traditions, and cultural situations to address the urgent issues associated with violence toward women.
In: Sisters, Mothers, Daughters: Pentecostal Perspectives on Violence against Women

Abstract

This chapter traces the development of Scandinavian Pentecostal Medical Mission in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, from a focus on basic medical care in the 1920s to an emphasis on fighting rape as a weapon of war in the 1990s. The chapter highlights the efforts of key individuals such as Gunnerius Tollefsen, Osvald Orlien, and Denis Mukwege, while also recognizing the contribution of other missionaries, doctors, nurses, and midwives. The last section is devoted to an overview of recent Congolese-Scandinavian initiatives that attempt to combat sexual violence and bring about change on individual, communal, and state levels.

In: Sisters, Mothers, Daughters: Pentecostal Perspectives on Violence against Women
In: Sisters, Mothers, Daughters: Pentecostal Perspectives on Violence against Women
Author: Rory Randall

Abstract

Denis Mukwege is the pentecostal pastor/medical doctor who was awarded the 2018 Nobel Peace prize (with Nadia Murad) “for their efforts to end the use of sexual violence as a weapon of war and armed conflict.” At Panzi Hospital in Bukavu, DR Congo he is asked, as a follower of Jesus, why he chooses to work in such a difficult and dangerous place. How can love can overcome hate? How is the Holy Spirit at work in reconciliation in the Congo? Does his work say something about theodicy?

In: Sisters, Mothers, Daughters: Pentecostal Perspectives on Violence against Women