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Author: Ann Vogel
Film festivals around the world are in the business of making experiences for audiences, elites, industry, professionals, and even future cultural workers. This book tells you why these non-profit organizations work as they do and attract people working for free, while appealing to businesses and policy-makers as cheap means to illuminate the creative city and draw attention to film art. Vogel provides firm evidence for the ‘festival effect’ that shows the festival as an intermediary in cinema value chains and unprecedented systematic sociological analysis of how event culture impacts on cultural workers’ lives. Read this book to find out what resources and institutional pillars ensure that festivalization of capitalism is here to stay, and why she urges us to think critically about publicly displayed benevolence.
Author: Gottfried Adam
The literary genre “Thumb bibles” belongs to the category of miniature books and is a subtype of children´s bibles. Thumb bibles summarize the whole bible by paraphrasing selected biblical narratives. They intend to communicate biblical basics to children and youth. The majority of them has pictures to illustrate the biblical content. This publication contains the first academic study of the thumb bibles. It explores their beginning in Britain, investigates their development in Germany and presents their climax in America. From these studies arises a clear picture of the theological, literary, pedagogical and pious profile of this fascinating literary genre.
Nostalgia and the Victorian Historical Novel
Author: Camilla Cassidy
Twilight Histories explores the relationship between nostalgia and the Victorian historical novel, arguing that both responded to the turbulence brought by accelerating modernisation. Nostalgia began as a pathological homesickness, its first victims seventeenth-century soldiers serving abroad. Only gradually did it become the sentimental memory we understand it as today. In a striking parallel to nostalgia’s origin, the historical novel emerged in the tumultuous early-years of the nineteenth century, at a time when the Napoleonic Wars once again set troops on the move, creating a new wave of homesick soldiers. In the historical novels of Gaskell, Thackeray, Dickens, Eliot and Hardy, nostalgia offered a language in which to describe the experience of living through changing times as a homesickness for history.
Zur Grenzziehung zwischen fiktionalen und nichtfiktionalen Erzählwerken mit Untersuchungen zu Max Frischs Montauk und Lukas Bärfuss’ Koala
Author: Victor Lindblom
Der Fokus der Studie liegt auf der Analyse des Fiktionalitätsstatus von Erzählwerken in der literaturwissenschaftlichen Praxis. Im Zentrum steht die Frage nach dem Zusammenhang zwischen Fiktionalität, der Vorstellungskraft und dem Handeln von Autorinnen und Autoren sowie Leserinnen und Lesern. Dabei wird eine wechselseitige Erhellung zwischen zwei gleichberechtigten Fragen unternommen: Was ist Fiktionalität und Nichtfiktionalität? Und: Welchen Fiktionalitätsstatus haben Max Frischs „Montauk“ (1975) und Lukas Bärfuss’ „Koala“ (2014)? So werden verschiedene Vorschläge erarbeitet und auf die Probe gestellt: erstens ein Vorschlag einer literaturwissenschaftlich operationalisierten Definition von Fiktionalität und Nichtfiktionalität; zweitens ein Vorschlag zur Klassifikation der beiden Erzählwerke, deren Fiktionalitätsstatus notorisch umstritten ist.
Cet ouvrage est la première étude systématique du rapport entre communauté et littérature dans la pensée de Jean-Luc Nancy. L'auteure développe la thèse originale que cette relation doit être comprise comme une refonte du mythe. Traversant l’œuvre de Nancy dans son intégralité, elle démontre de façon incomparable comment s’articulent les questions centrales de la communauté et de la littérature. De plus, en faisant ce lien en termes de « mythe », ce livre situe l’œuvre de Nancy dans une tradition plus large, allant du romantisme allemand aux théories contemporaines de la pertinence sociale de la littérature.

This is the first book to provide a systematic investigation of the relation between community and literature in the work of Jean-Luc Nancy. It develops the original claim that this relation has to be understood as a rethinking of myth. Traversing the entirety of Nancy’s vast oeuvre, the author offers an incomparable account of the ways in which Nancy’s central questions of community and literature are linked together. Moreover, by putting this linkage in terms of ‘myth’, this book situates Nancy’s work within a larger tradition, leading from German Romanticism to contemporary theories of the social relevance of literature.
Author: Jyhene Kebsi

Abstract

This paper looks at the field of world literature through the lens of the narratives of paperless migrants. I propose a paradigm of world literary texts that criticize the barriers preventing or restricting Southern border crossers’ ability to circulate freely in this so-called global village. Hakim Abderrezak coined the neologism “illiterature” in order to refer to the literature of “illegal” migration. This paper situates illiterature within the ongoing debate over the redefinition of world literature. It sheds light on contemporary theorizations of world literature in order to show that illiterature represents a transnational genre that incarnates a cross-national interaction exemplary of a world literary model that criticizes the hierarchy of mobility and the unequal access to movement.

In: Journal of World Literature
Combining theoretical and empirical approaches, this volume offers a wide-ranging survey of periodical research today. It illustrates the shift from content-related investigations and archival recovery to multidisciplinary analyses which consider, for instance, how magazines, newspapers, and other serial print products shape our opinions and help us to form like-minded communities. International specialists explore periodicals as relational artefacts, highlighting editorial constellations, material conditions, translation, design, marketing, and the consumption of newspapers and magazines from the late seventeenth to the twenty-first century. A must-read for academic and interested readers who wish to explore new and relevant ways to analyze periodicals.
In: Periodical Studies Today
Author: Andreas Beck

Abstract

As this essay aims to show, explicit self-reflection in early illustrated journals cannot be trusted: They underlie discursive constraints and may therefore (also) obscure the aims of such periodicals instead of exposing them. The illustration practice of texts (in which these statements are included), however, frequently offers, such is the working hypothesis, an implicit self-reflection which moves in a different direction: in the example presented in this article, one that refutes an explicit self-description by employing paratextual aspects such as the use of a layout plan (or lack thereof), paper quality, page numbering, placement of illustrations, and intertextual references. With the reconstruction of this implicit self-disclosure, the close reading of Magasin Pittoresque and Penny Magazine in the following case study intends to blaze a trail for an adequate analysis of illustrated journals of the 1830s – a trail that sheds particular light on the surprising complexity of verbal-visual forms of communication.

In: Periodical Studies Today

Abstract

In modern media history, newspapers, radio stations, and news platforms on the Internet are viewed as agents with their own agenda in an area of tension between politics, economy, culture, science, and the public. Thus, a new way of thinking has arisen in this discipline. The past media historiography had often tended to view historic events through a “mirror of the media.” This assigned the media the passive role of spectators of current events. In addition to this, internal operations of the media were rarely contextualized historically, and the editorial department was often viewed as a black box that functions independently from external influences. However, said discipline has abandoned this perspective over the past several years.

Currently, modern media history makes use of interdisciplinary approaches such as basic concepts of system theory according to Niklas Luhmann, the medializing theory, and the agenda-setting research, which enable the examination of the interrelation between media and their social environment. A further component of modern media history is a heuristic multiperspectivity which frees itself from press coverage as the only source and includes internal editorial documents as well as sources from archives of interaction partners. The third aspect are methodological tools, the use of which is enabled by the digital access to source material and leads to new questions and findings.

In this article, these approaches are outlined and illustrated using the history of the economics department of the Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung. The goal is to present components for a stringent examination of media as productive societal agents which can be used for further research.

In: Periodical Studies Today