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Author: Jan L. de Jong
In Tombs in Early Modern Rome (1400-1600), Jan L. de Jong studies how funerary monuments did not simply mark a grave, but offered an image of the deceased that was carefully crafted in order to generate a laudable memory and stimulate meditation on life, death and the hereafter. This leads to such questions as: which image of themselves did cardinals create when they commissioned their own tomb monument? Why were most popes buried in a grandiose tomb monument that they claimed they did not want? Which memory of their mother did children create, and what do tombs for children tell about mothers? Were certain couples buried together so as to demonstrate their eternal love, expecting an afterlife in each other’s company?
During the 13th and 14th centuries, medieval Castile produced some of the liveliest, most sophisticated vernacular reworkings of narratives inherited from classical and late antiquity, including those about Alexander the Great, the Trojan War, or Apollonius of Tyre. This study recovers the overlooked tradition of the Castilian romances of antiquity, showing how these works offered a nuanced reflection of the relationship between cultural memory, the media through which memory is shaped and transmitted, and Castile’s imperial ambitions. Clara Pascual-Argente restores a genre of great cultural and political importance to its rightful place in Castilian and European literary history.
Remembering Captivity, Enslavement and Resistance in African Oral Narratives
Author: Emmanuel Saboro
Emmanuel Saboro’s study on memories of the slave era in northern Ghana is a most welcome addition to a long and storied scholarly tradition examining song lyrics associated with the institution of slavery. As one might expect, the vast majority of such studies focus on the music traditions of the enslaved in North America. Collected between the mid-19th and early 20th century, historians, musicologist, and literary scholars have systematically analyzed these songs for what the lyrics can tell us about experiences during the era of slavery and the slave trade. Similar works that focus on West Africa, however, are rare indeed. Like his North American counterparts, Saboro examines the songs of northern Ghana as coded messages that express hope, comfort, resistance, rage and triumph over adversity. Having “no fixed meanings”, Saboro describes them as both flexible and greatly useful for conveying a variety of meanings.
In: Wounds of Our Past
In: Wounds of Our Past
In: Wounds of Our Past
In: Wounds of Our Past
In: Wounds of Our Past
In: Wounds of Our Past