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Author: Susanne Riecker
Diese Studie beschäftigt sich mit der zentralen Reflektionsfigur des Fiktionalen in Henry V, der „mockery“.
Diese Arbeit untersucht die zentrale Reflektionsfigur des Fiktionalen in Shakespeares Henry V, nämlich die „mockery“, die sowohl Imitation als auch Verspottung umfasst. Das Verhältnis von „mockery“ und „true things“ im Stück konstruiert eine immanente Poetik des Historiendramas, das damit gleichsam die Relation von Fiktion und Wahrheit, nicht nur im Sinne der Historizität, sondern auch des Universellen, reflektiert. Untersucht werden Aspekte der Kommunikation und Übersetzung, die Rolle des Publikums, der Umgang mit Möglichkeit und Notwendigkeit sowie die Kontextualisierung in den frühneuzeitlichen Diskurs zu Dichtkunst.
Evil women, who are they really? What are their motives, and how are they remembered and constructed within our culture? Evil Women: Representations within Literature, Culture and Film seeks to interrogate the nature and construction of evil women in the above fields. Through literature, poetry, history, ballads, film and real-life culture, scholars explore how the evil woman has been constructed and, in some cases, erased; the punishment and treatment of evil women; and the way evil women have been portrayed on and off screen through character, narrative and behind the camera development.

Abstract

According to early psychologists and sexologists, female sadism was one of the least common paraphilias. Often seen as the complimentary creation of the male masochist, the female sadist came to embody coldness and cruelty in opposition to the nineteenth-century sentimental woman. This paper will examine the writings of early psychologists, like Richard von Krafft-Ebing of Austria, Havelock Ellis of Britain, and Albert Eulenburg of Germany, on feminine evil and sadism by interrogating the source material upon which they relied, as well as considering how these early sources have influenced the way female sadists and sexual sadism more generally are discussed.

In: Evil Women: Representations within Literature, Culture and Film

Abstract

According to early psychologists and sexologists, female sadism was one of the least common paraphilias. Often seen as the complimentary creation of the male masochist, the female sadist came to embody coldness and cruelty in opposition to the nineteenth-century sentimental woman. This paper will examine the writings of early psychologists, like Richard von Krafft-Ebing of Austria, Havelock Ellis of Britain, and Albert Eulenburg of Germany, on feminine evil and sadism by interrogating the source material upon which they relied, as well as considering how these early sources have influenced the way female sadists and sexual sadism more generally are discussed.

In: Evil Women: Representations within Literature, Culture and Film
Author: Robyn Muir

Abstract

The Walt Disney Company has been classed as one of the storytellers of generations, accessed by millions of children and adults alike. But for every Disney fairy-tale there is commonly a source of evil that each protagonist must overcome. This chapter focuses on the evil women presented within Disney Princess films and their root of evil. I explore the implications of the Evil Queen of Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs (1937), and Mother Gothel of Tangled (2010) being depicted as narcissistic, their dichotomy between beauty and power, and how they are pigeonholed rather than developed as complex villains.

In: Evil Women: Representations within Literature, Culture and Film
Author: Robyn Muir

Abstract

The Walt Disney Company has been classed as one of the storytellers of generations, accessed by millions of children and adults alike. But for every Disney fairy-tale there is commonly a source of evil that each protagonist must overcome. This chapter focuses on the evil women presented within Disney Princess films and their root of evil. I explore the implications of the Evil Queen of Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs (1937), and Mother Gothel of Tangled (2010) being depicted as narcissistic, their dichotomy between beauty and power, and how they are pigeonholed rather than developed as complex villains.

In: Evil Women: Representations within Literature, Culture and Film
Author: Nicola Scholes

Abstract

Beat Generation poet Allen Ginsberg’s representation of his mother in his second major poem, ‘Kaddish’ (1961), contributes to cultural discourses of madness, badness and women. Naomi’s bad behaviour (attacking her mother-in-law, kicking her sister Elanor, exposing herself to her son) is due to her mental illness that is constructed as evil in its relentlessness. Ginsberg’s representation of Naomi as grotesquely embodying this evil is exceptional within his oeuvre in that it lampoons her descent from classically feminine ideals to grotesque realism. This disorients Ginsberg’s location within the countercultural movement, for his grotesque of Naomi constitutes the culture in the counterculture.

In: Evil Women: Representations within Literature, Culture and Film
Author: Nicola Scholes

Abstract

Beat Generation poet Allen Ginsberg’s representation of his mother in his second major poem, ‘Kaddish’ (1961), contributes to cultural discourses of madness, badness and women. Naomi’s bad behaviour (attacking her mother-in-law, kicking her sister Elanor, exposing herself to her son) is due to her mental illness that is constructed as evil in its relentlessness. Ginsberg’s representation of Naomi as grotesquely embodying this evil is exceptional within his oeuvre in that it lampoons her descent from classically feminine ideals to grotesque realism. This disorients Ginsberg’s location within the countercultural movement, for his grotesque of Naomi constitutes the culture in the counterculture.

In: Evil Women: Representations within Literature, Culture and Film

Abstract

Existing research suggests that Africans enslaved in the Americas retained an African worldview. African cosmologies inform magical practices known as Hoodoo. In a four-year ethnographic study of a daycare centre located in the U.S. South, I was a participant-observer of a corporate culture containing discursive practices reminiscent of African Americans in the historic U.S. South. I focus on speech practices of a particular administrator, finding silence to be the dominant response of employees. I conclude that material magic was not apparent, yet the communication dynamic is aptly described as magical with or without malice.

In: Evil Women: Representations within Literature, Culture and Film

Abstract

Existing research suggests that Africans enslaved in the Americas retained an African worldview. African cosmologies inform magical practices known as Hoodoo. In a four-year ethnographic study of a daycare centre located in the U.S. South, I was a participant-observer of a corporate culture containing discursive practices reminiscent of African Americans in the historic U.S. South. I focus on speech practices of a particular administrator, finding silence to be the dominant response of employees. I conclude that material magic was not apparent, yet the communication dynamic is aptly described as magical with or without malice.

In: Evil Women: Representations within Literature, Culture and Film