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Theories, Methods, Pedagogies, and Praxes
Volume Editors: , , and
While mobilizing the metaphor of ‘burning’, we remain ambiguous of the racial-geographical signifier of ‘Asian’. On one hand, ‘Asia’ as an idea emerged as a part of the colonial cartography of the world, divided subsequently into sub areas such as East Asia, South, Central and Western Asia. People from said geographies are treated as homogenous groups locatable by an index of skin colour, facial feature, culture, and language (Sakai, 2019). In this sense, the racialization of ‘Asia’ suggests the continuation of the racial-colonial-capitalist project of which Canada is an integral part. On the other, ‘Asia’ itself is diverse and heterogenous, fraught with internal tensions between ethnic groups and nation-states. It is perhaps only when ‘Asia-ness’ becomes a minoritarian experience that such diversity can potentially unify under the identity ‘Asian’. Even so, the uniformity is full of political, ethnic, gender, and economic divides. Therefore, we deploy Asian Canadian experiences not as a fixed referent by time and space, but as an ongoing engagement with the settler state and other racialized groups. In other words, we treat Asian Canadian as a process of encounter rather than a given ‘identity’ we are born into. ‘Asian Canadian’ might be at best a way of describing how people who either identify as Asians or come from Asian countries experience settler Canada’s state power, regulation, and governmentality, within a global capitalist system of exploitation and oppression. Depending on one’s immigration status, age, gender, sexuality, ability, and class, those perceived as ‘Asian’ might have completely different sets of experiences, identifications and affective relationships to settler Canada and their ‘places of origins’. Simultaneously, these differentiated social structures also mean that people identifying themselves as ‘Asians’ become complicit in the exploitation, marginalization and oppressions of other groups, as well as, simultaneously implicated in global racial capitalism, colonialism, anti-Indigenous racism, anti-Black racism, homo and transphobia, sexism and ableism. ‘Asian Canadian experiences,’ therefore, are best understood as relational, contradictory and becoming. This collection is concerned with moments and places of tensions, confrontations, relations, and solidarity. We offer no roadmap for liberation but stories of insurgent encounters as people who identify or become ‘Asian’ migrate, navigate, and implicate uneven global systems to make new dreams, histories and intimacies.
Volume Editors: and
Step into the lives of extraordinary women leaders in this groundbreaking volume. This compelling collection presents autoethnographies of twenty-five women leaders in English Language Teaching (ELT) from around the world. Grounded in key leadership theories and ELT research, these narratives examine the intersectionality of gender, race, culture, and transnational experiences in shaping leadership identities. Authors candidly share their triumphs and challenges, inspiring readers to embrace their own leadership potential and effect change in their communities and beyond. By articulating the personal, institutional and global complexities, the narratives inform our understanding of how ELT teachers navigate the path to leadership.

Contributors are: Tasha Austin, Lena Barrantes-Elizondo, Kisha Bryan, Quanisha Charles, May F. Chung, Ayanna Cooper, Tanya Cowie, Taslim Damji, Darlyne de Haan, Su Yin Khor, Sarah Henderson Lee, Gloria Park, Ana-Marija Petrunic, Doaa Rashed, Kate Mastruserio Reynolds, Teri Rose Dominica Roh, Mary Romney-Schaab, Amira Salama, Cristina Sánchez-Martín, Xatli Stox, Debra Suarez, Shannon Tanghe, Lan Wang-Hiles, Marie Webb and Amea Wilbur.
Contemporary art must get inspiration from somewhere. In Tea, Automatons, and Time Machines, the subculture of Steampunk art is studied in relation to art history. Addressing three main topics within social and environmental justice, a comparison of art styles and creativity stems from an artist’s passion within popular culture.

Using arts-based research methods and personal introspection viewed through the lens of nostalgia, a unique perspective of art history studies comes to life. Nostalgia, being primarily a psychological study, is used as a lens to view art, culture, and memoir into a complete research project.

We live in a world in need of change. Historically, artists have provided a means for change through their work and the lives they choose to live. The vastness of art history provides plenty of room for inspiration and interpretation. In this study, the contemporary sub-culture of Steampunk looks nostalgically at Arts and Crafts, Art Nouveau, and Art Deco eras in a way that paves the way for social change and environmental preservation using fantasy, cos-play, and art to demonstrate needed changes. Through the art and culture of Steampunk, we explore areas that could use improvement in our modern world, and yet, they do tie in with similar occurrences of the past. We find that we’re not that different but with art and demonstration, we too, can make positive changes for our future.
Volume Editors: , , and
The world ecological system is marked by difference throughout. There is social difference with different identities, shifting and transmuting, being forged, and extra-human differences. All these have implications for intra human and human/non-human earth relations. This aspect is not always recognised and valorised. Education, though not an independent variable, still can be mobilised, together with other sources of potential transformation, to redress this situation marked by aggressions, micro and macro, inertia and indifference. It represents a number of immediate challenges for Adult Education. This compendium is intended as a useful resource in this regard. It maps out a kaleidoscope of myriad differences and suggests options for overcoming the various obstacles that stand opposed to those who seek fulfilment in the way they are discursively located. The obstacles are a dent on efforts to living in communion with the rest of the cosmos. The utopian view is that of different species living in harmony with each other. This book emphasises social/ecological justice, intersectionality and relationality as the targets for Adult Education in this relatively still new millennium.

Contributors are: Sharifah Salmah Binti Abdullah, Thi Bogossian, Lauren Bouttell, Lidiane Nunes de Castro, Anyela Nathalie Gomez Deantonio, Preeti Dagar, Raquel Galeano Giminez, Ksenija Joksimović, Kainat Khurshid, Robert Livingston, Peter Mayo, Sonia Medel, Yunah Park, Zainab Sa’id Sa’ad, Bonnie Slade, Gameli Kodzo Tordzro, Agnieszka Uflewska and Aisara Yessenova.

Abstract

Is the global discourse on adult education Eurocentric? There are diverse forms of Indigenous and local practices of adult education that have emerged and existed in different parts of the world over the course of time. This chapter elaborates on the significance of bringing good practices of adult education from Global South into the mainstream notion of adult and lifelong learning. Through this chapter, we aim to create a bridge between different notions and perspectives of adult education across the globe by highlighting practices and ideas emerging from the Global South. This chapter addresses what decolonising adult education means for the researchers, practitioners, adult educators and learners. It draws on post-colonial and Indigenous theory, within the paradigm of adult education by including perspectives from various scholars such as Freire, Linda Tuhiwai Smith, Gandhi, Tagore, Ngugi WaThiong’o, Edward Said, and others.

In: Adult Education and Difference
In: Adult Education and Difference
Authors: and

Abstract

For a long time, the topic of the environment had been neglected in critical adult education for social change, despite being present in the works of the seminal authors Marx and Freire. Lately, however, scholars have been reflecting on critiques of means of production, consumerism, harmonic relations between humans and nature, and other important subjects within an environmental agenda through community-based, popular, and adult education. Based on perspectives from critical environmental adult education in opposition to a liberal one, this chapter discusses some possibilities that this type of education uncovers to achieve social change around the world through bottom-up approaches.

In: Adult Education and Difference

Abstract

Popular Culture has been relegated to the spaces outside of the educational environments. However, in order to harness the educational potential that it has to offer, it is necessary to recognise how it influences people’s lives. Popular Culture is ubiquitous and as a Public Pedagogy, it teaches individuals about social differences through representations that define what is normal, who belongs and who is excluded. Popular Culture is disseminated by the media, that are the most powerful form of non-formal education, with messages that tend to be accepted without questioning. Nonetheless, when educated about interpreting these messages, is possible to start shaping Popular Culture instead of just being shaped by it. This chapter aims to shed light on how sexuality and gender issues can be critically addressed in Adult Education through Popular Culture, unveiling stereotypes and power structures in order to challenge and change inequalities.

In: Adult Education and Difference

Abstract

In an era marked by breath-taking advancements in artificial intelligence (AI) and a rapidly evolving global landscape, the quest to create embracing lifelong education systems has never been more pressing. Indeed, we find ourselves at a pivotal juncture, confronting not only the transformative potential of AI, but also the enduring legacies of colonialism that continue to shape our educational institutions and praxes. This chapter serves as a compass in the voyage towards imagining lifelong education in a manner that transcends its challenging roots, questions the Western and non-Western colonial praxes, and embraces peaceful and sustainable ethical values. The chapter commences by defining the colonial matrix of power and recognising the historical entanglements of education systems with colonialism. We emphasise that these colonial legacies continue to cast a long shadow, impacting the learning environment, its structures, and participants. We also highlight the emerging role of AI on education, AI-Ed, whose potential to shift educational paradigms adds another layer of complexity. While offering unprecedented opportunities for personalised learning, global interconnectivity, and innovation, AI carries the risk of exacerbating existing colonial injustices, inequalities and biases. We argue that the ongoing AI transformation of education needs to extend beyond the boundaries of mere technical innovation and inclusivity, and needs to be grounded in a profound commitment to planet-centred, sustainable and peaceful vision(s) of knowledge and praxis for harmonious co-existence of all life species on planet Earth. In this context the fusion of AI with planet-centred, peaceful and sustainable ethical values becomes a vital consideration. To do so, we present the idea of seeds. Standing for smart educational ecosystems of dependence and support, seeds constitute a set of signposts aimed at the reconfiguration of current epistemological disbalances of power. Already sprouting around the globe, there are the signs of hope for creating non-discriminatory and embracing lifelong education systems that flourish beyond the colonial matrices of power.

In: Adult Education and Difference

Abstract

The UK government has fostered a ‘hostile environment’ towards migrants over the last seven years. This has particularly impacted people who are refugees and asylum seekers. Despite rhetoric that migrants should learn English, funding for ESOL has been slashed. Initiatives in ESOL are commonly spearheaded by civil society groups, providing essential adult education in their communities. This chapter investigates the multitude of ways inclusive education for newcomers is being provided in the face of government ‘hostility’. The flexibility of non-formal provision yields a more welcoming and empowering environment that recognises the importance of the knowledge migrants carry with them. We explore how emerging methods in ESOL characterise this unique approach to language learning, and move beyond the idea that education for migrants is limited to learning English.

In: Adult Education and Difference