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Educational Insights from Australia, New Zealand and Germany
Author:
The meaning of being Muslim has undergone enormous changes in the aftermath of the bombings in New York in 2001. The initial reaction of media outlets was to portray them as a global threat. In social-cultural and political context, they were thought to be unable to fit into Western societies. For example, in a major survey, over half of Australians preferred that their relatives not to marry into a Muslim family.

This book examines the extent to which falsehoods relate to attitudes and perceptions of young Muslim and Western students in German, Australian and New Zealand educational institutions to each other. It also addresses the views, pressures, unconscious biases, presumptions and expectations, social cultural and religious influences that drive the relationship between the two communities.
Volume Editor:
Esports is a global phenomenon that has attracted the attention of multiple interested parties—from investors to K-12 schools and universities. This text chronicles the multitude of ways that people are making meaning within and around the esports ecosystem. Literacies that occur in the esports ecosystem are the result of a collision of diverse experiences, actions, peoples, games, software, hardware, and roles. These literacies are multifaceted, multilayered, and multifarious. By acknowledging the call that these literacies hold, stakeholders can argue for their appreciation at all levels of the ecosystem. Literacies of the Esports Ecosystem answers this call.

Contributors are: Anthony Betrus, Andrew Cochran, Luis E. Pérez Cortés, Jason Engerman, Thorkild Hanghøj, Ryan Rish and Kevin Sweeney.

Abstract

Esports, as a form of digital competition, has the potential to be leveraged for STEM skills development through game based culturally relevant activities within living learning communities. Traditional living learning communities (LLC s) are residential communities that embed a shared academic or thematic focus rooted in curricular structure, reimagine roles of faculty and students, and codesign implementations of program activities to provide opportunities for peer leadership. As a knowledge production tool, there are positive connections between the living learning community and the formation of participatory esports ecosystems. Our Creative Media Factory (CMF) junior research team utilized successful aspects of previous CMF events to develop an engaging and educational LLC for two 6-day long summer camps. The current chapter examines how LLC s can merge with esports communities and cultures, particularly when framed through a Culturally Relevant Computing (CRC) lens. The current chapter is framed through the primary elements of Culturally Relevant Computing we crystallized as social connections, cultural asset-building, and self-reflection towards narrating the learner’s meaning-making processes. Preliminary findings demonstrate esports as a viable tool to positively impact youths’ attitudes, awareness, and motivation towards STEM careers. The foundation of knowledge and inquiry developed through ESportsU becomes a strong foundation for success of at-risk youths to pursue STEM higher education and careers.

In: The Literacies of the Esports Ecosystem
In: The Literacies of the Esports Ecosystem

Abstract

League of Legends is a global community involving millions of people (players, coaches, analysts, casters, etc.). Currently, there seems to be a dearth of literature to properly explain how this community, and the smaller communities with it, functions at a philosophical level. Lave and Wenger’s seminal book on legitimate peripheral participation (LPP) takes many of the components into account, but the nuances of this community require a more detailed explanation. In 1991, Lave and Wenger did not have access to the internet (as it is today) and the interconnectedness that can be achieved through it. With the ability to access so many different levels of mastery through varying media, Lave and Wenger’s original description of communities of practice and LPP can be expanded. This chapter proposes that while League of Legends is an excellent example of Lave and Wenger’s communities of practice, there is potential for League of Legends, and most gaming communities, to represent something more complex and interconnected than an original description of traditional communities of practice. This chapter describes the current literature on communities of practice, a discussion of League of Legends as a community of practice, and two additions to the literature on communities of practice. These additions are braided communities and nested communities. These additions are based in the situated cognition and ecological psychology literature. A braided community is one where individuals transfer what they have learned from other communities into one they are currently engaging with. For instance, an individual who is or has been an American football coach may bring experiences from American football that would benefit the esports coaching community and that individuals own understanding of the esports coaching community and vice versa. A nested community is a smaller community that exists within a larger context. An example of this is the community of professional players among the larger League of Legends community. League of Legends and other esports communities could serve as a prime example of these new types of communities which could help fill this gap in the literature and inform how communities of practice function with the interconnectedness that the internet can provide.

In: The Literacies of the Esports Ecosystem

Abstract

This chapter explores esports in high schools through a lens of multiliteracies and digital-age literacies. I asked the overarching question: How are digital-age multiliteracies taking place in high school esports contexts? Specifically, I focused on the digital-age literacy practices, demands, and perspectives in high school esports. Guided by research questions on these three topics, I carried out a study of two high school esports clubs for 22 weeks between September 2020 and February 2021. This study was guided by qualitative, interpretive, naturalistic, ethnographic, and case study research designs. My findings describe six assertions: (1) literacy practices were used to engage with each other in communal and competitive ways; (2) the social functions of esports’ literacy practices take precedence over scholastic goals; (3) literacy demands of esports emphasize unambiguous and timely multimodal communication for managing teams and scheduling events; (4) literacy demands of high school esports focus on multidimensional fluencies between what is on and what is around screens; (5) participants characterize the engagement with esports as positively contributing to “belonging”, of a “safe space”, and of opportunities for “critical thinking”; and (6) participants characterize their engagement with high school esports as contributing to future occupational or educational preparedness and health.

In: The Literacies of the Esports Ecosystem
In: The Literacies of the Esports Ecosystem
In: The Literacies of the Esports Ecosystem
In: The Literacies of the Esports Ecosystem
In: The Literacies of the Esports Ecosystem