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Volume Editors: and
A crucial question for Chinese as a Second Language research is how to help elevate Chinese language teaching methodology to the level of other world language methodologies such as English, Spanish and German. This work goes in two directs. One explores how to apply research results achieved in Chinese linguistics to Chinese language teaching and the other is engaged in creating a strong applied linguistics research field that supports Chinese language teaching. CASLAR scholars are mainly involved in the latter one. This book is a representative sample of their research endeavors.
As a praxis-based sequence these texts are specifically designed by the team of international scholars to engage in local in-country language pedagogy research. This exciting and innovative series will bring a dynamic contribution to the development of critical new literacies. With a focus on literacy teaching, research methods and critical pedagogy, the founding principle of the series is to investigate the practice of new literacies and digital literacies in English language learning and teaching, as negotiated with relevance to the localized educational context. It is being and working alongside people in the world that is at the core of the PELT viewpoint. The Praxis of English Language Teaching and Learning series will focus on inter-culturality and interdisciplinary qualitative inquiry and the dissemination of “non-colonised” research in the age of the Anthropocene.
Volume Editors: , , and
The world ecological system is marked by difference throughout. There is social difference with different identities, shifting and transmuting, being forged, and extra-human differences. All these have implications for intra human and human/non-human earth relations. This aspect is not always recognised and valorised. Education, though not an independent variable, still can be mobilised, together with other sources of potential transformation, to redress this situation marked by aggressions, micro and macro, inertia and indifference. It represents a number of immediate challenges for Adult Education. This compendium is intended as a useful resource in this regard. It maps out a kaleidoscope of myriad differences and suggests options for overcoming the various obstacles that stand opposed to those who seek fulfilment in the way they are discursively located. The obstacles are a dent on efforts to living in communion with the rest of the cosmos. The utopian view is that of different species living in harmony with each other. This book emphasises social/ecological justice, intersectionality and relationality as the targets for Adult Education in this relatively still new millennium.

Contributors are: Sharifah Salmah Binti Abdullah, Thi Bogossian, Lauren Bouttell, Lidiane Nunes de Castro, Anyela Nathalie Gomez Deantonio, Preeti Dagar, Raquel Galeano Giminez, Ksenija Joksimović, Kainat Khurshid, Robert Livingston, Peter Mayo, Sonia Medel, Yunah Park, Zainab Sa’id Sa’ad, Bonnie Slade, Gameli Kodzo Tordzro, Agnieszka Uflewska and Aisara Yessenova.

Abstract

Is the global discourse on adult education Eurocentric? There are diverse forms of Indigenous and local practices of adult education that have emerged and existed in different parts of the world over the course of time. This chapter elaborates on the significance of bringing good practices of adult education from Global South into the mainstream notion of adult and lifelong learning. Through this chapter, we aim to create a bridge between different notions and perspectives of adult education across the globe by highlighting practices and ideas emerging from the Global South. This chapter addresses what decolonising adult education means for the researchers, practitioners, adult educators and learners. It draws on post-colonial and Indigenous theory, within the paradigm of adult education by including perspectives from various scholars such as Freire, Linda Tuhiwai Smith, Gandhi, Tagore, Ngugi WaThiong’o, Edward Said, and others.

In: Adult Education and Difference
In: Adult Education and Difference
Authors: and

Abstract

For a long time, the topic of the environment had been neglected in critical adult education for social change, despite being present in the works of the seminal authors Marx and Freire. Lately, however, scholars have been reflecting on critiques of means of production, consumerism, harmonic relations between humans and nature, and other important subjects within an environmental agenda through community-based, popular, and adult education. Based on perspectives from critical environmental adult education in opposition to a liberal one, this chapter discusses some possibilities that this type of education uncovers to achieve social change around the world through bottom-up approaches.

In: Adult Education and Difference

Abstract

Popular Culture has been relegated to the spaces outside of the educational environments. However, in order to harness the educational potential that it has to offer, it is necessary to recognise how it influences people’s lives. Popular Culture is ubiquitous and as a Public Pedagogy, it teaches individuals about social differences through representations that define what is normal, who belongs and who is excluded. Popular Culture is disseminated by the media, that are the most powerful form of non-formal education, with messages that tend to be accepted without questioning. Nonetheless, when educated about interpreting these messages, is possible to start shaping Popular Culture instead of just being shaped by it. This chapter aims to shed light on how sexuality and gender issues can be critically addressed in Adult Education through Popular Culture, unveiling stereotypes and power structures in order to challenge and change inequalities.

In: Adult Education and Difference

Abstract

In an era marked by breath-taking advancements in artificial intelligence (AI) and a rapidly evolving global landscape, the quest to create embracing lifelong education systems has never been more pressing. Indeed, we find ourselves at a pivotal juncture, confronting not only the transformative potential of AI, but also the enduring legacies of colonialism that continue to shape our educational institutions and praxes. This chapter serves as a compass in the voyage towards imagining lifelong education in a manner that transcends its challenging roots, questions the Western and non-Western colonial praxes, and embraces peaceful and sustainable ethical values. The chapter commences by defining the colonial matrix of power and recognising the historical entanglements of education systems with colonialism. We emphasise that these colonial legacies continue to cast a long shadow, impacting the learning environment, its structures, and participants. We also highlight the emerging role of AI on education, AI-Ed, whose potential to shift educational paradigms adds another layer of complexity. While offering unprecedented opportunities for personalised learning, global interconnectivity, and innovation, AI carries the risk of exacerbating existing colonial injustices, inequalities and biases. We argue that the ongoing AI transformation of education needs to extend beyond the boundaries of mere technical innovation and inclusivity, and needs to be grounded in a profound commitment to planet-centred, sustainable and peaceful vision(s) of knowledge and praxis for harmonious co-existence of all life species on planet Earth. In this context the fusion of AI with planet-centred, peaceful and sustainable ethical values becomes a vital consideration. To do so, we present the idea of seeds. Standing for smart educational ecosystems of dependence and support, seeds constitute a set of signposts aimed at the reconfiguration of current epistemological disbalances of power. Already sprouting around the globe, there are the signs of hope for creating non-discriminatory and embracing lifelong education systems that flourish beyond the colonial matrices of power.

In: Adult Education and Difference

Abstract

The UK government has fostered a ‘hostile environment’ towards migrants over the last seven years. This has particularly impacted people who are refugees and asylum seekers. Despite rhetoric that migrants should learn English, funding for ESOL has been slashed. Initiatives in ESOL are commonly spearheaded by civil society groups, providing essential adult education in their communities. This chapter investigates the multitude of ways inclusive education for newcomers is being provided in the face of government ‘hostility’. The flexibility of non-formal provision yields a more welcoming and empowering environment that recognises the importance of the knowledge migrants carry with them. We explore how emerging methods in ESOL characterise this unique approach to language learning, and move beyond the idea that education for migrants is limited to learning English.

In: Adult Education and Difference

Abstract

This chapter proposes a paradigm shift with regard to the ‘gender dimension’ of adult education research by discussing the critical considerations when conducting adult education research with transgender and gender non-binary (TGNB) individuals and communities. It presents an understanding of gender identity from the perspective of queer theory with an intersectional lens, highlighting the heterogeneous nature of the transgender community, which is often overlooked in research in human sciences. The chapter discusses the contribution of qualitative research methods to the reparation of epistemic injustice done to TGNB people in education theory, provision, and research. Drawing from the critical research paradigm and feminist theories (queer theory and intersectionality theory), the chapter proposes applying a social justice lens to different (qualitative) research designs, guiding critical decision-making at every stage of the research process. The chapter provides recommendations for trans-affirming qualitative inquiry.

In: Adult Education and Difference