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In der Verknüpfung von Recht und Kulturtechnik verfolgt der vorliegende, interdisziplinäre Band eine doppelte Perspektive: Er fragt nach dem medialen und materiellen Umfeld, in dem Recht entsteht. Und er untersucht, wie ‚Recht als Kulturtechnik‘ seine soziokulturelle Umwelt gestaltet. Als ein besonderes Arrangement, das materielle, mediale und intellektuelle Kulturtechniken verschaltet, erzeugt das Recht nicht nur rechtliche Normativität, sondern auch Subjekte, es stiftet Beziehungen und reguliert Gesellschaften, es formt sogar Affekthaushalte nicht nur in Prozessen oder vor Gericht, sondern auch in Literatur, Kultur und Film. Die Beiträge aus Literatur-, Medien- und Rechtswissenschaft fragen nach dem Konnex von Rechtssubjektivität und Kulturtechnik, den rechtlichen Techniken des (Anti-)Kolonialismus und den juridischen Kulturtechniken der digitalen Gegenwart.
Stream – Archive – Ambience
The ubiquity of digital images is an effect of their distributive versatility. They can be stored almost indefinitely, transmitted instantaneously, reproduced without transformations, visualized in many layers, dated and processed. Their mobilization does not take place randomly, but follows a complex media logistics of format standards, infrastructures and transport calculations. Digital images will be and are distributed: not as sessile objects, bindingly fixed entities, but as stream-like modulated processes. The study conceptualizes actors and agendas of image data traffic, examines retro-digitized archive image corpora in terms of media history and distribution histories, and deals with 'calmed' image sensor operations in intelligent environments.
Free access
In: Signs and Media
Free access
In: Signs and Media
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Abstract

This article employs Tzvetan Todorov’s ‘triggers of interpretation’ to examine how Song Confucian classicists disproved the omenology of the Five Phases. Since the first century, the omenology has shifted to being the paradigm of interpreting omens and disasters. However, many Confucian classicists during the Song dynasty grew dissatisfied with this paradigm and offered arguments to challenge its authority and validity. A few studies have noted this but have not dissected why Song Confucianists could discredit the system deeply ingrained in the Chinese intellectual landscape. To address this gap, I first revisit the omenology of the Five Phases and identify that its feasibility rests on the authority of Confucian learning and the analogy between signs and interpretants. Next, I discover that the counterarguments of most Song Confucianists not only elucidated this omenology as a misinterpretation of Confucian classics by Han Confucian classicists, but also found the analogy unreasonable and devoid of any ground.

Open Access
In: Signs and Media
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Abstract

Both ‘sign’ and ‘symbol’ are words with a long and polysemic history in Western culture. Moreover, the 120-year history of the modern semiotics movement has failed to provide a highly needed definition of these most basic terms, thus resulting in ambiguity of the definition of the discipline itself. This paper proposes defining ‘sign/symbol’ as ‘a sensuous entity to be regarded as carrying meaning’. Furthermore, the terminological chaos that arises between ‘sign’ and ‘symbol’, which originated in Western languages, has caused chaos for translators in selecting the appropriate Chinese term from the options Fuhao and Xiangzheng, since a phonetic rendition is hardly possible in Chinese. On this basis, the paper attempts to define ‘semiotics’ as ‘the formal study of meaning-making’. In this understanding, semiotics covers not only signification but also communication and interpretation of meaning.

Open Access
In: Signs and Media
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Abstract

This article discusses new developments in the field of literary theory and literary praxis in the era of new media from the perspectives of media theory and interology. It takes new media as a McLuhanesque formal cause and holds that a conspicuous characteristic of literary works in the era of new media lies in the salience and normalization of interality. This development means art forms like mosaic and Pointillism have acquired a paradigmatic significance as a result. In revealing this new paradigm, the article also points to some current social maladies that have come with new media. It holds that literary writing should go beyond the mere embodiment of symptoms and make an intervention in media-induced maladies. The article affirms the irreplaceability of experimental literature and serious literature in an era of attention deficit, and points out that form should occupy a paramount position in literary theory, literary criticism, and literary praxis.

Open Access
In: Signs and Media

Abstract

In 1980, Umberto Eco’s first novel Il nome della rosa was published in Italy and has quickly had global resonance, entering China by the late 1980s. Since then, six translations have been published in the Chinese language, including two issued by Taiwanese translators. It is interesting to observe how each version is able to refract the socio-cultural contexts of the translators, depending on the aspirations and cultural images created in the different periods and geographic areas. We need also consider that, especially in the case of Eco’s novels, the translators had to not only deal with the different needs and expectations of their readers but also imagine a ‘new model reader’, just as Eco did. Therefore, this paper aims at confronting the six different translated versions, by identifying the new model readers imagined by the translators, considering their own expectations, knowledge, and cultural context.

Open Access
In: Signs and Media
China's Social Media under Xi Jinping
Author:
Why has China’s authoritarian government under Xi Jinping retained popular support without political reforms? Drawing on Chinese social media data, in this book Titus C. Chen argues that China’s digital propaganda and information control techniques--the monopolistic exercise of market authoritarianism--have empowered the Xi administration to manipulate public discourse and shape public opinion via social media. Chen argues that these techniques forge a sense of community and unite the general public under the Chinese government, thereby legitimating autocratic rule. By enhancing our understanding of China’s digital ideological statecraft, the book makes a major contribution to the fields of China Studies and Political Communication.