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Volume Editors: Michael Hanaghan and David Woods
Ammianus Marcellinus composed a history of the Roman empire from 96 AD to 378 AD, focusing on the mid-fourth century during which he served in the army. His experience as a soldier during this period provides crucial realia of warfare, while his knowledge of literature, especially the genre of historiography, enabled him to imbue his narrative with literary flair. This book explores the tension between Ammianus’ roles as soldier and author, examining how his military experience affected his history, and conversely how his knowledge of literature affected his descriptions of the Roman army.
Author: Gohar Muradyan
Greek myths were, to some extent, familiar to medieval Armenian authors, mainly through translations of late classical and early Christian writings; they also appear in original works, but this knowledge was never profound or accurate. Both translators and Armenian authors, as well as later scribes, while translating, renarrating and copying short mythical stories, or mentioning or just alluding to them often related the stories and the familiar or unfamiliar names occurring in them correctly, but sometimes they made mistakes, chiefly corrupting names not well-known to them, and sometimes, even details of the plot.
This is the first study which brings together the references to ancient Greek myths (154 episodes) in medieval Armenian literature by including the original Armenian and Greek (if extant) text and translation. With appendices listing the occurrences of Greek gods, their Armenian equivalents, images, altars, temples, and rites, the Aesopian fables and the Trojan war.
Author: Brian Madigan
Andrea Fulvio’s Illustrium imagines and the Beginnings of Classical Archaeology is a study of the book acknowledged by contemporaries to be the first attempt (1517) to publish artifacts from Classical Antiquity, in the form of a chronology of portraits appearing on coins. The study determines which represented coins correspond to genuine, ancient coins, and the degree of their accuracy in reproducing the legends, and the iconography and style of the originals. The study then addresses the methodology by which Fulvio attempted to exploit coins as historical documents, intersecting with humanist literary and historical studies of ancient Rome, the reception of ancient artifacts, and the response of visual artists to ancient portrait renderings.
This Companion is the first of its kind on the Roman historian Cassius Dio. It introduces the reader to the life and work of one of the most fundamental but previously neglected historians in the Roman historical cannon. Together the eighteen chapters focus on Cassius Dio’s background as Graeco-Roman intellectual from Bithynia who worked his way up the political hierarchy in Rome and analyses his Roman History as the product of a politically engaged historian who carefully ties Rome’s constitutional situation together with the city’s history.