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Editors: Andrew Hall and Leighanne Yuh
Education, the production of knowledge, identity formation, and ideological hegemony are inextricably linked in early modern and modern Korea. This study examines the production and consumption of knowledge by a multitude of actors and across languages, texts, and disciplines to analyze the formulation, contestation, and negotiation of knowledge. The production and dissemination of knowledge become sites for contestation and struggle—sometimes overlapping, at other times competing—resulting in a shift from a focus on state power and its control over knowledge and discourse to an analysis of local processes of knowledge production and the roles local actors play in them. Contributors are Daniel Pieper, W. Scott Wells, Yong-Jin Hahn, Furukawa Noriko, Lim Sang Seok, Kokubu Mari, Mark Caprio, Deborah Solomon, and Yoonmi Lee.
Volume 1: Interactive, Contrastive, and Cultural Representational Approaches
How do you react to an intercultural situation that you do not understand? There are four options. You wait until it’s over. You adjust your behavior and “do as the natives do.” You blame the other as strange and stupid. Or you start to wonder by thinking about yourself and the other(s). This last option is called a Rich Point. This book provides an overview of research into intercultural communication. It is not a handbook, but offers nine studies that illustrate the reflection process from different scholarly perspectives. The approaches in this volume are the interaction approach, contrastive approach and cultural representational approach.
Volume 2 offers nine additional chapters exemplifying the multilingualism approach and transfer approach including research into intercultural competences. Together, the chapters illustrate the essence of the essentialism and non-essentialism debate regarding diversity and inclusion.
Volume 2: Multilingual and Intercultural Competences Approaches
How do you react to an intercultural situation that you do not understand? There are four options. You wait until it's over. You adjust your behavior and “do as the natives do.” You blame the other as strange and stupid. Or you start to wonder by thinking about yourself and the other(s). This last option is called a Rich Point. This book provides an overview of research into intercultural communication. It is not a handbook but offers nine studies that illustrate the reflection process from different scholarly perspectives. The approaches in this volume are the multilingualism approach and transfer approach including research into intercultural competences. Volume 1 offers nine additional chapters exemplifying the interaction approach, contrastive approach, and cultural representational approach. Together, the chapters illustrate the essence of the essentialism and non-essentialism debate regarding diversity and inclusion.
Author: Gottfried Adam
The literary genre “Thumb bibles” belongs to the category of miniature books and is a subtype of children´s bibles. Thumb bibles summarize the whole bible by paraphrasing selected biblical narratives. They intend to communicate biblical basics to children and youth. The majority of them has pictures to illustrate the biblical content. This publication contains the first academic study of the thumb bibles. It explores their beginning in Britain, investigates their development in Germany and presents their climax in America. From these studies arises a clear picture of the theological, literary, pedagogical and pious profile of this fascinating literary genre.
From a survivor parent to the next generation
Known for its breathtaking scenery, the central-east African country of Rwanda lived through one of the worst episodes of violence of the late 20th century, known as the 1994 Genocide against the Tutsi, in which over a million people were brutally murdered in 100 days.This book recounts the personal story of Claver Irakoze who survived the genocide as an eleven-year-old child and, like other Rwandans of his generation, is now grappling with the heavy responsibility of raising children in the post-genocide context.Tracing the various stages of Irakoze’s life experiences, each chapter teases out issues surrounding childhood, parenting and the transmission of memories between generations. The final chapter draws on Irakoze’s personal and professional experience to provide some reflections on managing memories of genocide within the family.
Author: Di Luo
Beyond Citizenship focuses on the role of literacy in building a modern nation-state by examining the government provision of adult literacy training in early twentieth-century China. Based on untapped archives and diaries, Di Luo uncovers people’s strategic use of literacy and illiteracy in social interactions and explores the impact of daily experiences on the expansion of state power. Highlighting interpersonal and intergroup relations, Beyond Citizenship suggests a new methodology of studying literacy which foregrounds the agentive role of historical actors and so moves away from a more traditional approach that treats literacy itself as the key factor enabling social change.
Historisch-systematische Rekonstruktionen zu einem denknotwendig ungeklärten Verhältnis
Utopien haben mal mehr und mal weniger Konjunktur – nicht nur, aber auch in der Pädagogik. Man kann sie maßlos überschätzen, müde belächeln oder generell für hinfällig und überholt erklären; sobald man jedoch danach fragt, wohin Erziehung und Bildung sinnvollerweise führen sollen, kann man sich der utopischen Dimension menschlichen Lebens kaum entziehen. Um hier zu wissenschaftlich fundierten und wohlbegründeten Orientierungen zu gelangen, wird in der Monografie der Begriff der Utopie als historisch-systematische Vermittlungsfigur rekonstruiert und dabei reflektiert, in welcher Weise pädagogisches Denken und Handeln immer in die (Re-)Produktion bzw. Erneuerung menschlicher Lebensverhältnisse verstrickt ist.