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Approaching the Global Competition and the Russian War against the West
Volume Editor: Valentin Naumescu
By comparing the great-powers’ foreign policy, this book investigates the global competition and revisionist attempts to dismantle the Western liberal order. Since February 2022, the international system has been challenged by the Russian invasion in Ukraine and its profound, multiple consequences.Putin’s War has reinvented the West. But still, this is not “the end of history”. To illustrate that tensions between democratic and autocratic great powers are nowadays at their peak since the end of the Cold War, one should consider President Biden’s words in Warsaw, referring to President Putin: “For God’s sake, this man cannot remain in power!”
If you want to better understand not only international but also social diplomacy, then this book is for you. If you are a practitioner in traditional diplomacy or a person who want to apply diplomatic ideas and methods in social life, you can find many useful insights in this original work. A scholar and experienced diplomat, the author argues that international and social diplomacy can learn from each other. He explores genuine diplomacy as a goodwill mission, constructive engagement, and dialogical interaction that can help states, non-state organizations, companies, groups, individuals, and their aggregations to create public goods and make positive social changes.
Editors / Translators: Laura Hostetler and Xuemei Wu
Commissioned by the Qianlong emperor in 1751, the Qing Imperial Illustrations of Tributary Peoples (Huang Qing zhigong tu 皇清職貢圖), is a captivating work of art and ideological statement of universal rule. Best understood as a cultural cartography of empire, the captivating artwork paired with ethnographic texts helps us to understand the complexity of Chinese diplomatic relations as well the ideological force behind them which was rooted in both dynastic history and the specifics of Qing rule.
Author: Katrin Buchmann
Buchmann analyses the work of UK, German, Danish and Swedish embassies in the USA and China on climate change in the late 2000s and early 2010s. She relates which coalitions and narratives embassies sought to develop to convince China and the United States that a more progressive climate policy was possible, to achieve gains supporting an agreement under the UNFCCC. This book shows that a key interpretation of climate diplomacy was selling/trade: Europe selling technology “solutions” to solve climate change. In this narrative, Europe has already done what needs to be done and outsourcing of production to China e.g. is ignored. In the USA, embassies entered coalitions with states, faith groups and the military, arguing that a more progressive climate policy was mandated by either God or security concerns. State politicians, including Democrats, often actually didn’t implement any climate policies. Any gains were reversed through climate denial lobbying funded by corporations. Embassies did not address this.
A Small Neutral State’s Visions of Modern War
Author: Wim Klinkert
Total War was the core concept around which military thought revolved during the interwar period. Total War was also a multifaceted, confusing concept that affected both civilian and military life. How did small states conceive of their place in such a destructive war? Did they close their eyes, relying on international law to protect them, or did they seek creative solutions?
This book examines how Dutch officers, in the shadow of three great powers, considered their military future, analysing the impact of European military ideas on a small state. This approach offers a new perspective on interwar dealing with assumptions about a new world war.
Networked Practices and Sanctions Implementation
Author: Kim B. Olsen
When policy-makers opt for sanctions or other economic power instruments in response to geostrategic challenges, the stage is set for geoeconomic diplomacy. Challenging traditional conceptions about the interplay between governments and markets, this book sheds a new light on the diplomatic actors and processes that shape successful geoeconomic foreign and security policy-making. Unpacking the ‘networked practices’ through which diplomats advanced the early implementation of the European Union’s far-reaching sanctions regimes against Russia and Syria, the book demonstrates how geoeconomic diplomats depend on their abilities to navigate in complex actor-networks in the interfaces between the public, private, and non-governmental realm.

Abstract

Both Arab and Muslim migrants have noticeable populations in all parts of the world. This article qualitatively investigates the Arabs, the Muslims, and mainly diaspora and transnationalism theories from historical and social understandings, based on primary and secondary sources. It engages conceptually in defining Arabs and Muslims through the lenses of diaspora and transnationalism theories, discusses theoretical issues and explores the status of the Arab and the Muslim diaspora(s) and transnational communities through primary data and the findings of the Global Muslim Diaspora Project, which surveyed 7,147 participants between 2018 and 2019. The report shows that the Arab experience abroad might be best described as diaspora, whereas Muslim migrants would be best referred to as transnational communities. Diaspora and transnationalism theories, among others, and particularly migration theories, must not be used interchangeably; each term should be used carefully to avoid confusion, especially when Arabs and Muslims are being studied.

In: Diaspora Studies

Abstract

A sense of belonging is one of the most important human needs. Immigrants might experience this differently because they tend to feel a lack of belonging to their host or home country. Nowadays, however, social media allows immigrants and diasporic groups to establish a digital sense of belonging. Members of the Turkish diaspora in Germany are inclined to use social media, especially Facebook, as a platform to connect with their roots, be informed about Turkish news, prove their Turkishness, and provide solidarity for each other. For this paper, we interviewed fifteen Turkish-Germans to get some insight into their perceptions about developing a digital belonging to Turkey through Facebook. We used discourse analysis to analyse their statements. The results suggest that Facebook allows Turkish-Germans to develop a digital belonging to Turkey through its specific features; however, it decreases their sense of belonging to Germany, as stated in the interviews.

In: Diaspora Studies

Abstract

Gender mainstreaming and peacemaking are fundamentally about spurring institutional change. Much of the literature on gendering peace negotiations does not explicitly address the institutional nature of these spheres. Using a feminist institutionalist framework, I analyze the 2010–2016 Colombian peace talks to uncover the endogenic formal and informal ‘rules of the game’ that both enabled and constrained feminist work and the eventual incorporation of a gender perspective within the final agreement. I show that Colombia’s exceptional gender perspective in its 2016 peace agreement was due not just to the inclusion of women at the negotiation table but also paradoxically because of and despite continued gendered logics that prioritized the masculine over the feminine. These findings demonstrate that to understand gender mainstreaming outcomes in peace processes we must not simply account for how many women and which women are at the table, but also for the gendered logics of the negotiation space.

In: International Negotiation

Abstract

In this study, we examined different models for the motivation of the Iranian diaspora to send remittances to Iran, with and without governance indicators, to analyse the impact of economic factors and governance indicators on remittances. The results based on the generalised method of moments (GMM) method show that the income level of the origin and host country had positive and significant effects on the diasporas’ motivation for remittances to Iran. Also, Iran’s real exchange rate has a negative impact on remittances, whereas the interest rate differential is positive. The results confirm that the quality of governance and its indicators are essential factors for remittances. Overall, the macroeconomic conditions, along with good governance in Iran, have influenced remittances. Between investment and altruistic motives, altruism has been the primary motivation of remittances due to the lack of good economic and governance conditions in Iran during the years under review.

In: Diaspora Studies