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Abstract

Chile experienced an unprecedented crisis in the early 1970s and some civilian groups started supporting a “military solution” which occurred on September 11, 1973. Parallels between 1970s Chile and 2020s United States can be drawn in terms of democratic tradition, polarization, private armed groups, and middle-class support of democracy. While the South American country experienced a democratic breakdown in South America, the process is ongoing in the North. This article discusses analogies between both countries and explains which lessons can be learned to protect the U.S. democracy.

In: Journal of Applied History
Author:

Abstract

Narrative is a fundamental form of historical thinking. As such, narrative is a representational framework through which real events can be ordered into simplified temporal sequences unfolding within historical settings, driven by the interaction of historical personages or collective entities such as nations or classes. These insights, however, are yet to be fully incorporated within the field of applied history, which could profit from a closer consideration of narrative as a concrete manifestation of what has been termed genealogical or processual history. Like the historical analogy, which has been the focus of much research, narrative has the potential to fruitfully make connections between past and present events, but also to misapply history for propagandistic purposes. To address these issues, this article presents a methodological model whose usefulness is demonstrated in two case studies, together with guidelines for how a narrative perspective could inspire future applied history research.

In: Journal of Applied History

Abstract

This introduction situates the discussion of emotion and selfhood in medieval literature in a critical and cultural context, addressing its relevance for postmedieval readers and scholars. It addresses concepts such as performativity, selfhood and emotionality and their importance for the understanding of medieval literature. It furthermore elaborates on the rationale of the special issue and its scope, which extends across Scandinavia, Germany, Britain, Northern France, Flanders and the Netherlands. Finally, it proposes that the literary representation of selfhood is intimately interlinked with emotionality and the staging of literary emotions and introduces a broad range of essays to test this hypothesis across multiple cultural realms, generic forms and literary traditions.

Open Access
In: Emotions: History, Culture, Society
Author:

Abstract

This afterword sums up and responds to the articles in the special issue. It notes the variety in representations of the textual self and its constitution through emotion across medieval Northern Europe; representations which nevertheless depend on an imagined body. It also calls attention to the development of ideas of subjectivity and interiority and the ways in which literary experimentation drives social change, ending with a plea to reconsider the association of the medieval period with violence.

In: Emotions: History, Culture, Society
Free access
In: Emotions: History, Culture, Society
In: Emotions: History, Culture, Society
In: Simone de Beauvoir Studies