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The series Architecture – Technology – Culture provides a publishing environment for cutting-edge research in the three areas where modern technology effected major and lasting changes: architecture and space, visual culture and the media, literature and the arts in general. While our prime focus is on the theory, history, and politics of technology, both architecture and, the broader, accompanying field of culture are in many ways directly related to and influenced by technological changes. Thus one can look at architecture as a technology of spatial organization, a technical system of signs or, in Nobert Wiener's terms, a "technique" of the time that reflects the aesthetic and intellectual order of a given society. Literature and the arts, on the other hand, are crucial in negotiating the tensions that arise from the introduction of new technologies, of new means of production and communication. By making technological progress palatable for a larger public or by questioning its safety and its potential negative consequences for the future, the arts are inextricably involved in the changing of physical space and the environment in modern society and their styles and structures are often formed as a response to larger networks such as urban space, transportation or the changes in visual and material culture.
Brill’s Paperback Collection offers a selection of the best recent Brill standard editions at a price that the individual scholar can afford. The collection of 29 titles covers all the areas of the humanities in Brill’s list: History, Classical and Jewish Studies, Asian and Middle Eastern Studies, Law, and Religion.

Brill’s publications have always been well received by scholars in the past and it is at their suggestion that some of the more interesting titles of recent year be made available in a cheaper form. Our authors have been asked to select a first list of such titles that would be of direct use to their colleagues and students. The books are produced ‘on demand’ but with the fine quality of production associated with Brill: they are ready for dispatch within a few days of ordering and will be available for as long as there is a single customer for them. We are sure that established scholars will be interested: why not try them out yourself.

If you think that they would be of use for your students in your teaching, please contact Brill for examination copies.

The volumes in Brill’s Paperback Collection will all be shortly available at same low prices in e-book form.

The series published an average of three volumes per year over the last 5 years.
How has man dealt in daily practice with the uncertainty intrinsic to the future? Prognostication in History is a peer-reviewed, international book series that investigates the concepts, techniques and practices and their development in different societies and in different periods. Its main focus is on Asia and Europe.
Prognostication in all its forms is an extremely diverse anthropological phenomenon, which so far has been understudied in the Humanities. The book series approaches the topic from a cross-cultural and multi-disciplinary perspective, aiming to both broaden specific knowledge and enhance critical reflection. Published in close cooperation with the Society for the Critical Study of Divination, it builds on the work of the International Consortium for Research in the Humanities at Erlangen University on “Fate, Freedom, and Prognostication – Strategies for Coping with the Future in East Asia and Europe”, thus providing a platform for scholars world-wide to present and connect their research on a subject of ever-growing importance for a wide variety of disciplines.
Established in 2010 to meet a growing international interest in Balkan studies, the Balkan Studies Library series publishes high-quality disciplinary and interdisciplinary research on all aspects of the Balkans with a focus on history, politics and culture. The region is defined here as comprising Greece, Albania, Bulgaria, Romania, Turkey and the countries of former Yugoslavia, including their imperial Ottoman and Habsburg heritage.

The series publishes monographs, collective volumes, and editions of source materials. Disciplines covered include history, anthropology, archaeology, political science, sociology, legal studies, economy, religion, literary studies, cultural studies, gender studies, film, theatre and media studies, art history, language and linguistics. The editors especially welcome comparative studies, be they comparisons between individual Balkan countries, or of (parts of) the region with other countries and regions. All submissions are subject to anonymous peer review by leading specialists.

As of Volume 28, the series is published by Verlag Ferdinand Schöningh.

The series does not publish conference proceedings.
Series Editors: and
Theologian Martin Bucer (1491-1551) had an extensive knowledge of European affairs. In addition to his contacts within Alsace and Germany, he established relations with almost every country on the continent. It was his ecumenical attitude that often led him to mediate between the various parties involved in the religious battles of his time. His deep commitment and his objective to reach an agreement can be traced in all his activities, works and letters. As Bucer did not found a religious denomination himself, his theological and historical importance has been underestimated for a long time. In addition, his handwriting is hard to decipher, which makes it difficult to deal with his works, especially his letters. This academic edition of Bucer's correspondence provides scholars with a rich source to understand a part of Reformation history about which very little is known.
Series Editor:
This series, which features monographs as well as edited volumes of researched papers and lectures, takes a broad view of the Chinese world. Open to different academic disciplines, it will focus on the peoples of China both within and beyond the boundaries of the modern state, on their history, culture and society in past and present times.

Culture, Diplomacy and Interactions
Series Editor:
The era of globalization has witnessed increasing activities across border and interactions between nations, especially between the East and the West. East and West: Culture, Diplomacy and Interactions aims to trace and investigate multiple-dimensional interactions between the East and the West from the Age of Sail to the Modern Era, culturally, socially, economically and diplomatically, with a focus on maritime history via and centered on port cities such as Macao, Goa, Melaka, Nagasaki in the East and their counterparts such as Lisbon, Seville, Amsterdam, London in the West. The series examines matters about empires, oceans, and human connections through changes in material lives and cultural politics, and analyzes the impact of the flow of cultural materials across oceans, such as artifacts, arts, goods, foods, books, knowledge, beliefs, etc., on port cities and urbanization. Particularly, it will provide readers with a new maritime vision of the East and Southeast Asian history of connections at the eastern end of the Maritime Silk Road, including the ports of East Indian Ocean and South China Sea: places from Nagasaki to Xiamen/Macao, from Singapore to Shanghai, from Hong Kong to Melbourne, etc. In doing so, it will unfold the process of formation and transformation of networks and fluxing space, generated or altered by trade, migrations, diplomacies, regional conglomerations, etc., illustrate the glocolization of religions, examine the relationship of culture/tradition and diplomatic strategy, and demonstrate the causes to miscommunication, misunderstanding, conflicts and confrontations between nations as well as appropriate reading, understanding and interpreting of each other.

East and West will include studies in such disciplines and area studies as maritime history, missionary history, intellectual history, international relations, arts, architecture, music, religious studies, and cultural studies. This series will feature monographs and edited volumes as well as translated works. It will be of interest to academics as well as general readers, including historians, artists, architects, diplomats, politicians, journalists, travelers, religious groups, businessmen, lawyers, among other groups.
Historical and Contemporary Accounts
Narrating the pilgrimage to Mecca discusses a wide variety of historical and contemporary personal accounts of the pilgrimage to Mecca, most of which presented in English for the first time. The book addresses how being situated in a specific cultural context and moment in history informs the meanings attributed to the pilgrimage experience. The various contributions reflect on how, in their stories, pilgrims draw on multiple cultural discourses and practices that shape their daily lifeworlds to convey the ways in which the pilgrimage to Mecca speaks to their senses and moves them emotionally. Together, the written memoirs and oral accounts discussed in the book offer unique insights in Islam’s rich and evolving tradition of hajj and ʿumra storytelling.

Contributors
Kholoud Al-Ajarma, Piotr Bachtin, Vladimir Bobrovnikov, Marjo Buitelaar, Nadia Caidi, Simon Coleman, Thomas Ecker, Zahir Janmohamed, Khadija Kadrouch-Outmany, Ammeke Kateman, Yahya Nurgat, Jihan Safar, Neda Saghaee, Leila Seurat, Richard van Leeuwen and Miguel Ángel Vázquez.
The Plurality of Historical Worlds from Epicurus to Modern Science
Author:
By digging through the stratigraphy of the history of ideas we can find within and beyond Marxism an ‘aleatory current’ that values the role of chance in history. Using this perspective, the book builds a case for a historical materialism that is stripped of all teleology. Starting in the ancient Mediterranean with Epicurus, it traces the history of conceiving history as plural up to Marxism and modern science. It shows that concrete historical ‘worlds’ such as ancient Mesoamerica and Eurasia cannot be reduced to a single template. Affirming the potentiality of a future non-capitalist ‘world’, it invalidates any ‘end of history’ thesis.