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Volume IV: Prosecutor v. Sesay, Kallon and Gbao (The RUF Case) (Set of 3)
The Special Court for Sierra Leone was established through signature of a bilateral treaty between the United Nations and the Government of Sierra Leone in early 2002, making it the third modern ad hoc international criminal tribunal. It has tried various persons, including former Liberian President Charles Ghankay Taylor, for serious violations of international humanitarian law committed during the latter half of the Sierra Leonean armed conflict. It completed its work in December 2013. A new Residual Special Court for Sierra Leone, based in Freetown and with offices in The Hague, has been created to carry out its essential “residual” functions.
This volume, which consists of three books and a CD-ROM and is edited by two legal experts on the Sierra Leone Court, completes the set of edited Law Reports started in 2012. Together, the Law Reports fill the gap of a single and authoritative reference source of the tribunal’s jurisprudence. The law reports are intended for national and international judges, lawyers, academics, students and other researchers as well as transitional justice practitioners in courts, tribunals and truth commissions, and anyone seeking an accurate record of the trials conducted by the Special Court for Sierra Leone.

N.B.: The hardback copy of this title contains a CD-ROM with the decisions that are reproduced in the book and the trial transcripts.
The e-book version does not.

Abstract

The aim of this paper is to present pictorial graffiti executed on the walls of the Northern Church of the Ghazali Monastery located in what is today the Northern Province of Sudan. The graffiti were recorded during research by the Polish-Sudanese mission at the monastic complex. This paper explores the symbolic meanings of the graffiti as well as possible rationales behind their locations. Some of the depictions have overt religious meanings and may be interpreted as “graphic” prayers. This category of graffiti includes representations of Christ, angels, saints, female figures and horse riders. Other depictions seem to refer to daily life in Nubia – the graffiti abound in motifs such as camels, horses, boats and human beings.

In: Journal of African Archaeology

Abstract

The experiences of participatory budgeting on the backdrop of the COVID-19 pandemic in Zimbabwe is widely discussed and acknowledged, yet there is paucity of literature of the interface between the two variables. This study therefore seeks to examine how Chitungwiza Municipality has interfaced with Residents and Stakeholders in the participatory budgeting processes during the COVID-19 pandemic. Using informant interviews, non-participant observation, focus group discussions and analytical desk research, the paper argues that COVID-19 pandemic and associated lockdowns has become the most recent threat to the practice of local democracy, particularly to those local government institutions that largely rely more on physical meetings as engaging platforms for participatory budgeting. The study prescribes policy recommendations to improve urban participatory governance within the context of COVID-19 pandemic situation.

In: The African Review

Abstract

This paper looks into the income and employment potential for youth and women in tourism micro, small and medium enterprises (MSME s). The survey data collected from seven regions of Tanzania during September–October 2018 is used. Analyses are focused on two main issues: estimation of determinants of income in tourism MSME s and implications for youth and women employment; and examination of perceived youth employment potential in the tourism industry of Tanzania. Quantile regression approach is applied in estimation of determinants of income; and the ratios of perceived employment potential and constraints to the youth employment are analysed. The findings demonstrate earning as the leading employment incentive and is determined by education of the owners of MSME s, inter alia. Larger proportion of enterprises owned by youth than those owned by elderly people are informal, which has a negative bearing on incomes of youth. Women and youth owned enterprises are constrained in terms of credit access. Policy implications include the need to address the social problem of gender inequality, enhancing requisite skills and knowledge for tourism sector professions, and formalisation and scaling up of credit access for the youth and women.

In: The African Review

Abstract

In southern Africa, the use of gravel outcrops has been recorded at a range of Earlier Stone Age sites, and this raises questions about the diversity of raw material sourcing practices adopted by hominins. To assess the existence of sourcing strategies, this study details a new morphometric analysis method that investigates the influence of pebble and cobble shape at two Acheulean case-study sites: Dungo IV (Benguela Province, Angola) and Penhill Farm (Eastern Cape Province, South Africa). Since these assemblages present frequent pebble and cobble artefacts, we investigate these to identify raw material blank properties to then establish whether these properties were intentionally selected for. To do so, we analyse each archaeological sample separately via a technological and morphometrical approach and then compare them with geological samples obtained during fieldwork survey. Overall, these two case studies provide some illustration of variable selection strategies within the southern African coastal plain.

In: Journal of African Archaeology

Abstract

This paper presents a critical review of the implementation of three selected articles of the Convention on the Right of the Child (CRC): Article 1 which defines of who is a child; Article 28 which stipulates the child’s rights to basic education; and Article 32, which calls on governments to protect the child from labour. Its analysis draws on the Tanzania 3rd, 4th, and 5th combined CRC implementation report, the CSO’s CRC implementation alternative report, and the CRC Committee’s observations. The findings suggest that, although there have been remarkable commitment and promising progress in making children’s rights a reality for Tanzanian children, there were still some challenges and dilemmas that emerged during their implementation. Thus, the study recommends for the harmonisation of the understanding of who is a child in addition to main-streaming work as an integral part of children’s childhood life.

In: The African Review

Abstract

The article argues that there are three senses of the term African diaspora – a continental, a cultural and a racial sense – which need to be distinguished from each other when conceptualising Black African diasporas in Europe. Although African Diaspora Studies is occupied with African diasporas in a racial sense, usually it has conceptualised these in terms of racial and cultural identities. This is also true of the past decades of African Diaspora Studies on Europe. This article makes an argument for a socio-political conceptualisation of Black African diasporas in Europe that includes, but goes beyond, matters of identity and culture.

In: African Diaspora