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Brill’s 'Mapping the Past' is a peer-reviewed book series exploring and revitalizing the relationship between the history of mapping and the mapping of history. The series editors stimulate to explore the potential of maps for the study of the past, and accordingly the series aims at cross-fertilizing the history of cartography with disciplines such as history, landscape studies, geography, art history, digital humanities, urban planning and heritage studies. Volumes take the study of maps and mapmaking practices as a crucial starting point for understanding the evolutions, representations and imaginations of past societies, landscapes and territories. They may equally present the results of broader collaborative research projects or detailed case studies, insofar they have wider methodological and theoretical relevance. The series has no temporal or geographical limitations and both monographs and coherently presented edited volumes are welcomed.

Authors are cordially invited to submit proposals or full manuscripts to the series editors Bram Vannieuwenhuyze and Iason Jongepier, or to the publisher at Brill, Wendel Scholma.
Volume Editors: Dušan Zupka and Grischa Vercamer
This book provides the first detailed overview of research on rulership in theory and practice, with a particular emphasis on the monarchies of Bohemia, Hungary and Poland in the High and Late Middle Ages. The contributions examine the legitimation of rule of the first local dynasties, the ritual practice of power, the ruling strategies and practices of power in the established monarchies, and the manifold influences on the rulership in East Central Europe from outside the region (such as from Byzantium, and the Holy Roman Empire). The collection shows that these ideas and practices enabled the new polities to become legitimate members of Latin Christendom.
In The Struggle for Development and Democracy Alessandro Olsaretti argues that we need significantly new theories of development and democracy to answer the problem posed by neoliberalism and the populist backlash, namely, uneven development and divisive politics. This book proposes as a first step a truly multidisciplinary humanist social science, to overcome the flaws of neoliberal economic theories, and to recover a balanced approach to theories and policies alike that is especially needed in the wake of the 9/11 attacks. These led to divisive culture wars, which were compounded by the divisive populist politics. This book begins to sketch such a humanist social science, and applies it to answer one question: who is responsible for neoliberalism and the populist backlash?
While the social history of Europe and North America has been the subject of many scholarly publications, the social history of Asia, Africa, and Latin America has been more neglected. Furthermore, these societies are often studied in isolation from the global context. The series Studies in the Social History of the Global South offers a platform for the social history of these three continents with the specific intention of redressing the balance in terms of the perceived dominance of studies on the global north. This series welcomes publications of case studies at the local, regional and continental level. Studies in Social History of the Global South, as a sub-series of Studies in Global Social History, shares the aims and scope of the main series.

Authors are cordially invited to submit proposals or full manuscripts to the series editors Touraj Atabaki, Rossana Barragán, and Stefano Bellucci, or to the publisher at Brill, Wendel Scholma.
The Test It Was a Crime to Fail
The last person to ‘pass’ White Australia’s Dictation Test did so in 1907 by submitting a watercolour entitled ‘Advance Australia Fair. For the next 50 years of its existence the thereafter more carefully trained officials ensured no one ever passed again. Here is detailed how the White Australia Policy came to have a fake test of dictation at the heart of its administration. Beginning as an inspired piece of hypocrisy designed to preserve the semblance of imperial equality, in the hands of the early Commonwealth of Australia this ‘education test’ quickly evolved into a test it was impossible to pass.