In: Amsterdamer Beiträge zur älteren Germanistik
In: Amsterdamer Beiträge zur älteren Germanistik
Author: Gertjan Postma

Abstract

A well-known exception to Grimm’s Law, /kʷ/ > /f/ instead of /kʷ/ > /hʷ/, is taken as a starting point and its reflexes in Middle Dutch and Sal-Frankic are discussed. As to the PIE root *leikʷ-, MD and MLG līf- in the compounds līfeigen ‘owned by the fief’, līftuht ‘feudal law’, and līfcōp ‘feudal transaction fee’ is identified as derived from this root under a regular sound change, which is coined Uhlenbeck’s Law. Uhlenbeck’s Law acts as a resolution of a pansyllabic constraint, not a constraint on roots. As to Sal-Frankic, the new etymology of SF leo- ‘related to the tenements’’, and by extention ‘agricultural’, sheds new light on the structure of the Lex Salica. It is argued that the tripartite manorial system of land tenure has reflexes in juridical terminology of this archaic legal document.

In: Amsterdamer Beiträge zur älteren Germanistik

Abstract

There are convincing reasons to see the ‘Younger Titurel’ not as a continuation of the ‘Titurel’ Fragments, but as a critical supplement, completion and perfection of Wolfram von Eschenbach’s ‘Parzival’. It is against this backdrop that we need to explain the ‘Younger Titurel’ taking up and correcting Wolfram’s ‘Titurel’ verses. This article will provide such an explanation. It starts from the premise that Albrecht does not only critically distance himself from Wolframs narration, but also from the superficial form of the ‘Parzival’ and ‘Titurel’. From his perspective, the narrative form of ‘Parzival’ was inappropriate. This opinion manifests itself in the harmonized verse of YT. Through its claim to beauty, it promises to bestow a capacity for knowledge which is directed towards the Good. In that regard, the ‘Younger Titurel’ is a noëtic novel.

In: Amsterdamer Beiträge zur älteren Germanistik
Author: John M. Jeep

Abstract

A fourteenth-century version of Notker’s translation of the psalms with commentary yields 58 alliterating Middle High German word-pairs. These are compared with Notker’s original Old High German text, whereby phonological, morphological, semantic and syntactic changes are noted. In studying the transmission of the Biblical text, both continuity and change become evident.

In: Amsterdamer Beiträge zur älteren Germanistik
Author: Akira Kusamoto

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to discover the language preferences of a letter writer for Wilhelm von Berg (1401–1428) in 15th century Westphalia. Various written languages such as Ripuarian, Westphalian and Eastphalian were already established in the region and it is known that writers sometimes mixed one language variation with the other. The study also considers other questions: i) Did writers maintain their prior-developed writing habits? ii) Did they learn the written language practiced at a new location when changing their place of work? The research uses a collection of correspondences between Wilhelm and his siblings, most of which are published here for the first time. They cover his frequent moves from within North-Western Germany when he either wrote letters himself or had them written for him. The study starts with distinguishing the handwritings of his letters, and then moves to an analysis of language variations used through a comparison of specific words. Results show that changing location for one writer (probably Wilhelm himself) did not greatly influence his language use, but that he took on new variants of certain words in his letters.

In: Amsterdamer Beiträge zur älteren Germanistik

Abstract

The etymology of the name of the river Dommel in the Netherlands causes some serious difficulties. In fact it has up to now been seen as an unsolved problem. A new close examination of the oldest attestations, like Dudmala (AD 704), has resulted in a new analysis, viz. *dūd-mal-a in which dūd- means ‘folk’, mal- means ‘dingplaats’ and -a is the appellative for ‘water’ < *aχwa-: ‘running water near to a dingplaats’. The two first elements find their parallel in the German place name Detmold, traditionally considered as going back to Germanic *Þeud-maχla – 1263 detmalle, 783 theodmalli.

In: Amsterdamer Beiträge zur älteren Germanistik