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Poetic Narratives for Racial Equity, Equality, Healing, and Freedom
What does it mean to be Black in America? In this book, Pierre W. Orelus uses his poetry to unpack this question, unmasking racism, sexism, and oppression in America. The 59 poems in this collection deal with a wide range of topics, from immigration to xenophobia, from Black pride to Black rage, from parenting to female empowerment.

Since the dawn of time, poetry and stories have been used to address social issues while inspiring at the same time deep, imaginary, and philosophical thoughts. This book combines poetry with short stories situated in very specific historical, racial, socio-economic, and cultural contexts to examine the existential experiences of Brown and Black people in the Americas, particularly in the United States of America, with systemic racism, voucher capitalism, xenophobia, and sexism, among other social wrongs.
Educational equity, inclusion, belonging, and justice are widely considered to be the most important civil rights challenge of the 21st century. Many HBCUs began in the 1800s as institutions to prepare Black teachers to teach in segregated America. Although their focus has expanded since their critical beginnings, HBCUs remain significant producers of African American teachers. Today, as the United States grapples with educational disparities, lack of diversity among education professionals, systemic racism, and the recent politically-inspired assaults on Critical Race Theory, we need HBCU leadership in pre-kindergarten through 12th grade education more than ever. Black College Leadership in PK–12 Education amplifies the research and perspectives of HBCU leaders, including four HBCU education deans, on how HBCUs help school districts optimize education for Black preschool, elementary and secondary students. Specific topics include HBCU teacher preparation, building HBCU and PK–12 partnerships, culturally responsive teaching, inclusive assessment practices, and HBCU leadership in STEM education. This book is ideal for school teachers and administrators who want to use HBCUs as a resource to improve education, as well as HBCU leaders who want to work more effectively with local school districts.
This book offers a critical perspective of the education of the Latinx populations around the world. Whether they are first-generation immigrants, new immigrants, or native born, the research presented in this book pulls from the authors’ personal experiences and their students’ experiences and their rich and diverse cultures to connect with and inspire those interested in learning about the reality of Latinx populations in the US and beyond.

The Latinx research described in this book aims at combatting deficit perspectives among educators and the public. It has taken on the task of highlighting the knowledges and experiences of Latinx students and their communities as strengths and resources to transform curriculum, teaching, and schooling. These chapters craft pedagogies and highlight initiatives that directly work against hegemonic and colonizing practices and schooling. As a result, this book critiques oppressive curriculum and instead recognizes the teacher as a critical actor.