In Anatolian Verbal Stem Formation, David Sasseville offers an extensive classification of the Luwian, Lycian and Lydian verbal stem classes. This serves as a basis for reconstructing the Proto-Luwic stage and subsequent comparison with Hittite, providing new insights into the Proto-Anatolian verbal system and by extension into the reconstruction of Proto-Indo-European.
Besides its contribution to the study of verbal morphology, the present book also provides significant insights into the philology of the Anatolian languages. The detailed analyses of the synchronic data, including a philological survey of verbal forms and paradigms for the individual stem classes, enhance our understanding of Luwian, Lycian and Lydian and thereby benefit the fields of Hittitology and other studies on the Classical period in Asia Minor.
Author: Kaira Boddy
With The Composition and Tradition of Erimḫuš Kaira Boddy offers the first comprehensive study of the lexical list Erimḫuš. Boddy gives a detailed analysis of its structure and the ways in which the text and its role in scribal scholarship changed over time. Erimḫuš was highly valued by the Assyrian and Babylonian scholars of the first millennium BCE and several centuries earlier even caught the interest of the Hittites, who had their own ingenious ways of interpreting and using the material. Originally a bilingual list collecting groups of Akkadian words and their Sumerian equivalents, Erimḫuš took on a radically different character in Ḫattuša.
In The Hittite Middle Voice Guglielmo Inglese offers a new treatment of the middle voice in Hittite. The book features two main parts. In the first part, the author provides an updated synchronic description of the Hittite middle based on the existing typology of voice systems and valency changing operations. Moreover, based on a careful analysis of a chronologically ordered corpus of original Hittite texts, the book offers the first ever diachronic account of the Hittite middle. As Inglese argues, the findings of this book greatly enrich our general knowledge of the diachronic typology of middle voice systems. The second part of the book features a thorough description of more than 100 Hittite verbs in original texts.
In History of the Pauline Corpus in Texts, Transmissions, and Trajectories , Chris S. Stevens examines the Greek manuscripts of the Pauline texts from P46 to Claromontanus. Previous research is often hindered by the lack of a systematic analysis and an indelicate linguistic methodology. This book offers an entirely new analysis of the early life of the Pauline corpus. Departing from traditional approaches, this text-critical work is the first to use Systemic Functional Linguistics, which enables both the comparison and ranking of textual differences across multiple manuscripts. Furthermore, the analysis is synchronically oriented, so it is non-evaluative. The results indicate a highly uniform textual transmission during the early centuries. The systematic analysis challenges previous research regarding text types, Christological scribal alterations, and textual trajectories.
In: History of the Pauline Corpus in Texts, Transmissions and Trajectories
In: History of the Pauline Corpus in Texts, Transmissions and Trajectories
In: History of the Pauline Corpus in Texts, Transmissions and Trajectories
In: History of the Pauline Corpus in Texts, Transmissions and Trajectories
In: History of the Pauline Corpus in Texts, Transmissions and Trajectories
In: History of the Pauline Corpus in Texts, Transmissions and Trajectories