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Author: Jörg Oberste
Between 1150 and 1350, Paris grew from a mid-sized episcopal see in Europe to the largest metropolis on the continent. The population rose during these two centuries from approximately 30,000 to over 250,000 inhabitants. The causes and consequences of this demographic explosion are thoroughly examined for the first time in this book by Jörg Oberste.

As it turns out, the management of urban space is key to understanding one of the most dynamic processes of urbanisation in pre-modern Europe: Who decides on the new construction of streets, squares, and houses? From whence does the multitude of new inhabitants come? What are the consequences of this massive wave of immigration on urban society, the economy, and the keeping of the peace? What kind of self-understanding evolves from the heterogeneous construct of the rapidly growing city, and what kind of external perceptions is late medieval Paris able to create? When does the myth of the “magical city on the Seine” (Heinrich Heine), perpetuated to the present day, come to be born? Oberste’s extensive investigation of the pertinent and wide-ranging medieval sources sheds new light on these and other questions related to the significant expansion of the City of Lights in the Middle Ages.
Editor-in-Chief: Cor Wagenaar
‘All history is world history’ – but the history of architecture and urbanism is not. It has been written from numerous biased perspectives: the history of the former colonies from that of Europe, the history of twentieth century architecture from that of modernism, the history of Central and Eastern Europe from that of the ‘West’ – and we could expand this list indefinitely. Supporting a historical approach with a historiographical angle, Brill Studies in Architectural and Urban History welcomes books that respect and restore the global dimension of architecture and urbanism, critically re-evaluate existing bodies of knowledge, and are the result of thorough research that are largely based on primary sources. The series has no geographical or temporal limitations – we’re happy to accommodate books on renaissance Italy as well as studies on South-African shanty towns, the main focus of the series being its international and critical approach.

The peer reviewed series accommodates English language scholarly monographs, collections of essays, conference proceedings, and works of reference.
In this ground-breaking work on the Ottoman town of Manastir (Bitola), Robert Mihajlovski, provides a detailed account of the development of Islamic, Christian and Sephardic religious architecture and culture as it manifested in the town and precincts. Originally a town on the edge of the Via Egnatia, this small provincial town gradually developed into a significant administrative, military, religious, cultural and intellectual centre for the Balkans; a vibrant place, nurturing progressive multi-cultural and multi-confessional values with considerable influence on the formation of modern Balkan identities.

The present work is the culmination of thirty years of research using primary source material from archives and chronicles and the monuments themselves for the purpose of both preserving and extending the boundaries of current knowledge. It offers a comprehensive biography of a great cultural knot in the Balkans and offers a rich source for further use by scholars, students and non-technical readership alike.
[Ancient Architecture in Syria: Southern Hauran]
Editor / Translator: Aisha Muhammed Ali Moussa
The Ancient Architecture in Syria (Southern Hauran), written by Howard C. Butler and translated by Aisha Moussa, is the product of studying 65 ancient sites in Southern Hauran. It focuses on the archeological and architectural heritage and presents detailed drawings of plans; restoration of buildings; and photographs of monuments, inscriptions and sculptures. The book covers the late pre-historic, Nabataean, Roman, Christian, and early Islamic periods (1st century B.C.E.- 7th century C.E.).
Many of the monuments described by Butler have long since disappeared or been destroyed, so this book provides an invaluable, thorough, detailed, and photographic documentation of the archeological treasure in Syria, the cradle of civilizations, particularly in view of the current pressing need for development and investment there.

يعد كتاب العمارة القديمة في سوريا (جنوب حوران)، من تأليف هوارد كروسبي باتلر وترجمة عائشة موسى، ثمرة دراسة 65 موقعًا أثريًا قديمًا في جنوب حوران. ويتناول الكتاب دراسة تراث الفن الأثري والمعماري ويعرض رسمًا مفصلًا للمخططات وترميمًا للمباني وتصويرًا للصروح الأثرية والنقوش والمنحوتات. كما يغطي الكتاب أواخر عصور ما قبل التاريخ والفترة النبطية والرومانية والمسيحية ومطلع الحقبة الإسلامية، في فترة تمتد بين القرن الأول قبل الميلاد ومطلع القرن السابع الميلادي.
لقد اختفت العديد من المعالم الأثرية التي صورها باتلر منذ أمد بعيد أو دمرت، لذلك يقدم هذا الكتاب توثيقًا مصورًا لا يقدر بثمن ويعد الأكثر شمولًا ودقة عن الكنوز الأثرية الثمينة في سوريا مهد الحضارات، لا سيما في ظل الحاجة الملحّة الآن لتنشيط مشاريع التنمية وخلق فرص الاستثمار فيها.
[Mamluk Palaces and Houses in Cairo: An Archaeological and Civilizational Study]
Author: Ghazwan Yaghi
Mamluk Palaces and Houses in Cairo studies the types of extant residential buildings in Cairo from the Mamluk era (1250-1517 C.E.) and the factors affecting their design, architectural and decorative elements, and building materials. It provides an archaeological, architectural, historical, and documentary study of all the surviving palaces and houses, focussing on the structural and architectural status of its various parts. The author also discusses its present-day restoration and rehabilitation projects.
In this book, Ghazwan Yaghi presents a variety of empirical material that sheds more light on the social and economic history of the Mamluk era, as well as a glossary of archaeological and documentary terminology that could serve as a tool for further research in Islamic architecture.

القصور والبيوت المملوكية في القاهرة يدرس أنواع المباني السكنية الموجودة في القاهرة من العصر المملوكي (0521-7151 م) والعوامل المؤثرة في تصميمها، وعناصرها المعمارية والزخرفية، ومواد بناءها، إضافة لتقديم دراسة أثرية ومعمارية وتاريخية ووثائقية لكل القصور والبيوت الباقية، مع التركيز على الحالة الإنشائية والمعمارية لكافة أجزاءها، وملقية الضوء على مشاريع ترميمها وإعادة تأهيلها حتى الوقت الحالي.
في هذا الكتاب، يقدم غزوان ياغي مادة ثرية تساهم في زيادة فهمنا للتاريخ الاجتماعي والاقتصادي للعصر المملوكي، كما يوفر مسرد المصطلحات الأثرية والوثائقية مادة علمية تزيد من فهمنا للعمارة السكنية الإسلامية التي يأتي المنتج المعماري فيها معبراً بصورة دقيقة عن أصحابه سواء منهم من أمر به أو من قام بتنفيذه.
Author: Julien Cooper

Abstract

The Medjay were a group of desert nomads inhabiting the region between the Nile and the Red Sea contemporaneous to the Bronze Age of Ancient Egypt (c. 3100-1050 bce). Well-known from textual sources from Pharaonic Egypt and Kushite Nubia, it has proven difficult to produce basic societal descriptions of the Medjay and their political status, especially in their desert heartland. Most studies dedicated to the Medjay evaluate their presence as a nomadic diaspora and emigres on the Nile or focus on their interaction with the Ancient Egyptian state. These approaches place little emphasis on their indigenous geography and nomadic heritage in the Red Sea Hills. This study takes a very different tact and attempts to reconstruct some basic information on their political geography in their indigenous homeland. Although the sources, both textual and archaeological, are currently scarce regarding a Second Millennium bce desert occupation, they do demonstrate complex arrangements between Medjay political actors and nearby states. Particularly notable was the ability of individual tribes to enact varying policies of entente, détente, and aggression towards their Nile neighbours as well as exercise de facto sovereignty over a wealthy desert consistently threatened by Egyptian and Kushite imperialism.

Open Access
In: Old World: Journal of Ancient Africa and Eurasia
A Socio-Political History of Architecture
Author: R.D. McChesney
In Central Asia, Muslim shrines have served as community centers for centuries, particularly the large urban shrines that seem, in many cases, to have served as the inspiration as well for a city’s architectural development. In Four Central Asian Shrines: A Socio-Political History of Architecture R. D. McChesney documents the histories of four such long-standing shrines—Gur-i Mir at Samarqand, Khwajah Abu Nasr Parsa Mazar at Balkh, the Noble Rawzah at Mazar-i Sharif, and the Khirqat al-Nabi at Qandahar. In all four cases the creation and evolution of the architecture of these shrines is traced through narratives about their social and political histories and in the past century and a half, through the photographic record.
Intercultural Engagements with Architecture and Craft in the Age of Travel and Reform
Author: Mercedes Volait
The commodification of Islamic antiques intensified in the late Ottoman Empire, an age of domestic reform and increased European interference following the Tanzimat (reorganisation) of 1839. Mercedes Volait examines the social life of typical objects moving from Cairo and Damascus to Paris, London, and beyond, uncovers the range of agencies and subjectivities involved in the trade of architectural salvage and historic handicraft, and traces impacts on private interiors, through creative reuse and Revival design, in Egypt, Europe and America. By devoting attention to both local and global engagements with Middle Eastern tangible heritage, the present volume invites to look anew at Orientalism in art and interior design, the canon of Islamic architecture and the translocation of historic works of art.
In: Antique Dealing and Creative Reuse in Cairo and Damascus 1850-1890
In: Antique Dealing and Creative Reuse in Cairo and Damascus 1850-1890