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Women’s Speculative Fiction in Contemporary Japan
Author: Kazue Harada
Contemporary Japanese female speculative fiction writers of novels and manga employ the perspectives of aliens, cyborgs, and bioengineered entities to critique the social realities of women, particularly with respect to reproduction, which they also re-imagine in radical ways. Harada examines the various meanings of (re)production in light of feminist and queer studies and offers close readings of works by novelists Murata Sayaka, Ōhara Mariko, Ueda Sayuri and manga artists Hagio Moto and Shirai Yumiko. Scholarship of SF in Japanese studies has primarily focused on male authors, but this book shows not only how women writers have created a space in SF and speculative fiction but how their work can be seen as a response to particular social norms and government policies.
Author: Tahera Aftab
In Sufi Women of South Asia. Veiled Friends of God, the first biographical compendium of hundred and forty-one women, from the eleventh to the twentieth century, Tahera Aftab fills a serious gap in the existing scholarship regarding the historical presence of women in Islam and brings women to the centre of the expanding literature on Sufism. The book’s translated excerpts from the original Farsi and Urdu sources that were never put together create a much-needed English-language source base on Sufism and Muslim women. The book questions the spurious religious and cultural traditions that patronise gender inequalities in Muslim societies and convincingly proves that these pious women were exemplars of Islamic piety who as true spiritual masters avoided its public display.
Asian Canadians—whether immigrant, international students, naturalized, native-born, or other—are hampered in their exploration and articulation of self by the dearth of critical writing both for them, and by them. Despite the influx of Asian students and their inflated tuition rates to Canadian postsecondary institutions, they are strikingly underrepresented in the literature of the academy. Critical theory focusing on Asian identity, anti-Asian racism, and the Asian-Canadian experience is limited, or presented as an artifact of the past.

Across the globe—but particularly in the English-speaking West—the internationalization of higher education continues its upward trend. 2017 data from the Canadian Bureau for International Education positioned Canada as the fourth-leading destination for international students seeking post-secondary education. The fact that the vast majority of international students at Canadian colleges and universities come from Asia has been well documented in domestic media, but the lived experiences and perspectives of these transnational individuals have not. This edited collection provides much-needed theorizing of Asian-Canadian lived experiences, focusing on such themes as: multiculturalism, diversity, race, culture, agency, education, community activism, citizenship, identity, model minority myths, gender, colonization, neoliberalism, and others.

Contributors include: Sarah Alam, Syed Fahad Ali, Wallis Caldoza, Valerie G. Damasco, Grace Garlow, Allison Lam, Kailan Leung, Juanna Nguyen, Dionisio Nyaga, Jasmine Pham, Vania Soepriatna, Tika Ram Thapa and Rose Ann Torres.
Her Role in the Spread of Tibetan Buddhism in Taiwan
Author: Fabienne Jagou
Through the biography of an unusual Manchu Chinese female devotee who contributed to the spread of Tibetan Buddhism in Taiwan, the book provides a new angle at looking at Sino-Tibetan relations by bringing issues of gender, power, self-representation, and globalization. Gongga Laoren’s life, actions and achievements show the fundamental elements behind the successful implementation of Tibetan Buddhism in a Han cultural environment and highlights a process that has created new expectations within communities, either Tibetan or Taiwanese, working in political, economic, religious and social contexts that have evolved from martial law in the 1960s to democratic rule today.
Author: Fabienne Jagou

Abstract

The second chapter shows that Tibetan Buddhism has not emerged as a new resource in the search for a Taiwanese identity on the periphery of the Chinese world. It analyzes Gongga Laoren move to Taiwan and the way she explains her three-year retreat and her spiritual achievement at the Mount Gangkar in Tibet. It underlines how she took credit from her experience in Tibet and how she developed her monasteries thanks to the Tibetan Buddhism initiations she transmitted to her Taiwanese disciples. The chapter describes her achievements on the island till her taking of the monastic vows, which marks a turning point in her action development.

In: Gongga Laoren (1903-1997)
In: Gongga Laoren (1903-1997)
Author: Fabienne Jagou

Abstract

The third chapter describes the study of cross-cultural religious relations in a globalizing world that Gongga Laoren understood very early. It shows how Gongga Laoren contributed to the flourishing of Tibetan Buddhism in Taiwan thanks to the many invitations she extended to the Karma Kagyü School’s great Tibetan masters eager to find new disciples and new resources.

In: Gongga Laoren (1903-1997)
In: Gongga Laoren (1903-1997)
Author: Fabienne Jagou

Abstract

The first chapter retraces Gongga Laoren’s life in China and in Tibet, from her birth to her arrival in Hong Kong through her meeting with Gangkar Rinpoche, her Tibetan Master. The chapter emphasizes the Tibetan Buddhism network in which she lived in China.

In: Gongga Laoren (1903-1997)
Author: Fabienne Jagou

Abstract

The fourth chapter highlights a process that has created new expectations within communities, either Tibetan or Taiwanese, working in political, economic, religious and social contexts. It describes how Gongga Laoren legacy has been sustained over time despite her death and how her legitimacy is definitely recognized by the Karma Kagyü School network.

In: Gongga Laoren (1903-1997)