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[Ancient Architecture in Syria: Southern Hauran]
Editor / Translator: Aisha Muhammed Ali Moussa
The Ancient Architecture in Syria (Southern Hauran), written by Howard C. Butler and translated by Aisha Moussa, is the product of studying 65 ancient sites in Southern Hauran. It focuses on the archeological and architectural heritage and presents detailed drawings of plans; restoration of buildings; and photographs of monuments, inscriptions and sculptures. The book covers the late pre-historic, Nabataean, Roman, Christian, and early Islamic periods (1st century B.C.E.- 7th century C.E.).
Many of the monuments described by Butler have long since disappeared or destroyed, so this book provides an invaluable, thorough, detailed, and photographic documentation of the archeological treasure in Syria, the cradle of civilizations, particularly in view of the current pressing need for development and investment there.

يعد كتاب العمارة القديمة في سوريا (جنوب حوران)، من تأليف هوارد كروسبي باتلر وترجمة عائشة موسى، ثمرة دراسة 65 موقعًا أثريًا قديمًا في جنوب حوران. ويتناول الكتاب دراسة تراث الفن الأثري والمعماري ويعرض رسمًا مفصلًا للمخططات وترميمًا للمباني وتصويرًا للصروح الأثرية والنقوش والمنحوتات. كما يغطي الكتاب أواخر عصور ما قبل التاريخ والفترة النبطية والرومانية والمسيحية ومطلع الحقبة الإسلامية، في فترة تمتد بين القرن الأول قبل الميلاد ومطلع القرن السابع الميلادي.
لقد اختفت العديد من المعالم الأثرية التي صورها باتلر منذ أمد بعيد أو دمرت، لذلك يقدم هذا الكتاب توثيقًا مصورًا لا يقدر بثمن ويعد الأكثر شمولًا ودقة عن الكنوز الأثرية الثمينة في سوريا مهد الحضارات، لا سيما في ظل الحاجة الملحّة الآن لتنشيط مشاريع التنمية وخلق فرص الاستثمار فيها.
In Kids Those Days, Lahney Preston-Matto and Mary Valante have organized a collection of interdisciplinary research into childhood throughout the Middle Ages. Contributors to the volume investigate childhood from Greece to the “Celtic-Fringe,” looking at how children lived, suffered, thrived, or died young. Scholars from myriad disciplines, from art and archaeology to history and literature, offer essays on abandonment and abuse, fosterage and guardianship, criminal behavior and child-rearing, child bishops and sainthood, disabilities and miracles, and a wide variety of other subjects related to medieval children. The volume focuses especially on children in the realms of religion, law, and vulnerabilities.
Contributors are Paul A. Broyles, Sarah Croix, Gavin Fort, Sophia Germanidou, Danielle Griego, Máire Johnson, Daniel T. Kline, Jenni Kuuliala, Lahney Preston-Matto, Melissa Raine, Eve Salisbury, Ruth Salter, Bridgette Slavin, and Mary A. Valante.
SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism explores how a range of cults and rituals were perceived and experienced by participants through one or more senses.

The present collection brings together papers from an international group of researchers all inspired by ‘the sensory turn’. Focusing on a wide range of ritual traditions from around the ancient Roman world, they explore the many ways in which smell and taste, sight and sound, separately and together, involved participants in religious performance. Music, incense, images and colors, contrasts of light and dark played as great a role as belief or observance in generating religious experience.

Together they contribute to an original understanding of the Roman sensory universe, and add an embodied perspective to the notion of Lived Ancient Religion.

Contributors are Martin Devecka; Visa Helenius; Yulia Ustinova; Attilio Mastrocinque; Maik Patzelt; Mark Bradley; Adeline Grand-Clément; Rocío Gordillo Hervás; Rebeca Rubio; Elena Muñiz Grijalvo; David Espinosa-Espinosa; A. César González-García, Marco V. García-Quintela; Jörg Rüpke; Rosa Sierra del Molino; Israel Campos Méndez; Valentino Gasparini; Nicole Belayche; Antón Alvar Nuño; Jaime Alvar Ezquerra; Clelia Martínez Maza.
The Jews of Hispania in Late Antiquity and the Early Middle Ages through Their Material Remains
In Hispanojewish Archaeology, Alexander Bar-Magen Numhauser provides the first book-length archaeological exploration of the Jewish presence in late antique and early medieval Hispania. Using epigraphic, numismatic, architectural, and other archaeological remains, this volume describes the multiple cultural expressions of a vibrant Jewish community that emerged as part of the Mediterranean Diaspora, becoming part of the wider Hispanian society. Part of this review includes a detailed examination of the Ilici (Elche, Spain) basilical building, interpreted by previous scholars as both a church and a synagogue, using published and hitherto unpublished material of its decades-long excavation. From the archaeological remains of this Hispanojewish presence a new picture emerges, challenging the traditional premises of the archaeological research on the late antique western Mediterranean.
Author: Paulina Komar
Eastern Wines on Western Tables: Consumption, Trade and Economy in Ancient Italy is an interdisciplinary and multifaceted study concerning wine commerce and the Roman economy during Classical antiquity. Wine was one of the main consumption goods in the Mediterranean during antiquity, and the average Roman adult male probably consumed between 0,5 - 1 litre of it per day. It is therefore clear that the production and trading of wine was essential for the Roman economy. This book demonstrates that wines from the Eastern Mediterranean and the Aegean region in particular, played a crucial part in wine commerce. Moreover, it sheds new light on economic dilemmas that have long puzzled scholars, such as growth and market integration during antiquity.
Papers in Memory of Sara B. Aleshire from the Second North American Congress of Greek and Latin Epigraphy
In Greek Epigraphy and Religion Emily Mackil and Nikolaos Papazarkadas bring together a series of papers first presented at a special session of the Second North American Congress of Greek and Latin Epigraphy (Berkeley 2016). That session was dedicated to the memory of Sara B. Aleshire, one of the leading Greek epigraphists of the twentieth century. The volume at hand includes a combination of previously unpublished inscriptions, overlooked epigraphical documents, and well known inscribed texts that are reexamined with fresh eyes and approaches. The relevant documents cover a wide geographical range, including Athens and Attica, the Peloponnese, Epirus, Thessaly, the Aegean islands, and Egypt. This collection ultimately explores the insights provided by epigraphical texts into the religious beliefs and practices of the ancient Greeks, but also revisits critically some entrenched doctrines in the field of Greek religion.
New Approaches to Ancient Material Culture in the Greek & Roman World is about Classical Archaeology at its broadest and is important reading to all Classicists. As part of a recent movement to highlight the rich diversity of the subject it overcomes traditional disciplinary boundaries to show the variety of current approaches to the study of Classical Antiquity from the Late Bronze Age to the Late Antique period. The multi-disciplinary papers deal with archaeology and art history, museum objects and fieldwork data, ancient texts and material culture, archaeological theory and historiography, and technical and literary analysis. The international contributors discuss a selection of methodologies currently used to study ancient material, and illustrate their relevance through case studies which span the Greek and Roman world.
EUHORMOS is an international book series intended for monographs and collective volumes on classical antiquity. Specifically, it welcomes manuscripts related to the concept of ‘anchoring innovation’ by classical scholars of all disciplines from all over the world. All books will be published in Open Access (online) as well as in print.
The series publishes book-length studies (single-authored or edited) of ancient innovations and their societal perceptions and valuations, in particular in connection with their ‘anchoring’, the various ways in which ‘the new’ could (or could not) be connected to what was already familiar. ‘The new’ is not restricted to the technical or scientific domains, but can include the ‘new information’ imparted by speakers through linguistic means, literary innovation, political, social, cultural or economic innovation, and new developments in material culture.

EUHORMOS is one of the results of the Dutch so-called Gravitation Grant (2017), awarded to a consortium of scholars from OIKOS, the National Research School in Classical Studies. See https://www.ru.nl/oikos/anchoring-innovation.

EUHORMOS is the Homeric term for a harbour ‘in which the anchoring is good’. Under this auspicious title, we aim to publish a book series striving to afford ‘good anchorage’ to studies contributing to a better understanding of ‘anchoring innovation’ in Greco-Roman Antiquity.

For sending your proposal or submitting manuscripts for the series, please contact Brill’s Assistant Editor for Classical Studies, Giulia Moriconi.
In Pilgrimage and Economy in the Ancient Mediterranean, Anna Collar and Troels Myrup Kristensen bring together diverse scholarship to explore the socioeconomic dynamics of ancient Mediterranean pilgrimage from archaic Greece to Late Antiquity, the Greek mainland to Egypt and the Near East. This broad chronological and geographical canvas demonstrates how our modern concepts of religion and economy were entangled in the ancient world. By taking material culture as a starting point, the volume examines the ways that landscapes, architecture, and objects shaped the pilgrim’s experiences, and the manifold ways in which economy, belief and ritual behaviour intertwined, specifically through the processes and practices that were part of ancient Mediterranean pilgrimage over the course of more than 1,500 years.