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Author: Ruobing Xian
The Odyssey is ‘ein Epos des Raums’. As the narrative unfolds, a number of speculative spaces are made vivid before the eyes of the audience: the locus amoenus surrounding Calypso’s cave, Alcinous’ palace, the landscape of Ithaca, and not least Odysseus’ megaron. The present study argues that the representation of space in the Odyssey plays a much more important role in the epic’s narrative dynamics than is hitherto recognized. By drawing on different approaches to Homeric poetry aiming at profound literary interpretation, this book offers close reading of selected passages from the Odyssey, focusing on the linguistic form as well as the narrative function of the epic’s representation of space.

Die Odyssee ist 'ein Epos des Raums'. Während sich die Erzählung entfaltet, werden der Hörerschaft einige spekulative Räumlichkeiten vor Augen geführt: der locus amoenus um Kalypsos Höhle herum, Alkinoos' Palast, die Ithakalandschaft und nicht zuletzt die Halle des Odysseus. Das vorliegende Buch vertritt die These, dass die Raumdarstellung in der Odyssee eine erheblich wichtigere Rolle spielt als bisher erkannt worden ist. Sich auf verschiedene Ansätze stützend, die auf eine tiefgreifende literarische Interpretation homerischer Dichtung abzielen, bietet dieses Buch eine genaue Lektüre ausgewählter Passagen aus der Odyssee, wobei der Schwerpunkt auf der sprachlichen Form sowie der narrativen Funktion der Raumdarstellung des Epos liegt.
The aim of this book is to provide new insights on the multi-faceted topic of the relationships between ancient Greece and ancient Anatolia before the Classical era. This is a rapidly evolving field of enquiry, thanks to the recent advances in our understanding of the Anatolian languages and the ever-growing availability of primary evidence.

The chapters in this volume investigate the question of Graeco-Anatolian contacts from various points of view and with a specifically linguistic and textual focus. The nature of the evidence calls for an interdisciplinary approach, and therefore the volume includes contributions ranging from writing systems to contact linguistics, without excluding the analysis of cultural motifs and religious practices in both literary texts and non-literary (mainly epigraphic) evidence.
Author: Richard Faure
Adapting tools recently developed in general linguistics and dwelling on a solid corpus study, this book offers the first comprehensive view on Classical Greek wh-clauses since Monteil (1963) and scrutinizes how wh-items (ὅς, ὅστις, τίς) distribute across the different clause types. False ideas are discarded (e.g., there are no τίς relative clauses, ὅστις does not take over ὅς’ functions). This essay furthermore teases apart actual neutralization and so-far-unknown subtle distinctions. Who knew that ὅστις is featured in three different types of appositive clauses? In the interrogative domain, an analysis is given of what licenses ὅς to pop in and τίς to pop out. Tackling these topics and more, this essay draws a coherent picture of the wh-clause system, whose basis is the notion of (non)identification.
Evaluating His Legacy over the Last Sixty Years
Volume Editor: Stanley E. Porter
James Barr is a widely recognized name in biblical studies, even if he is still best known for his The Semantics of Biblical Language. Barr’s Semantics, although first published in 1961, still generates animated discussion of its claims. However, over his lengthy career Barr published significant scholarship on a wide variety of topics within Old Testament studies and beyond. This volume provides an assessment of Barr’s contribution to biblical studies sixty years after the publication of his first and still memorable volume on biblical semantics. As a result, this volume includes essays on major topics such as the Hebrew language, lexical semantics, lexicography, the Septuagint, and biblical theology.
Author: James D. Dvorak
In The Interpersonal Metafunction in 1 Corinthians 1-4, James D. Dvorak offers a linguistic-critical discourse analysis of 1 Cor 1-4 utilizing Appraisal Theory, a model rooted in the modern sociolinguistic paradigm known as Systemic-Functional Linguistics. This work is concerned primarily with the interpersonal meanings encoded in the text and how they pertain to the act of resocialization. Dvorak pays particular attention to the linguistics of appraisal in Paul’s language to determine the values with which Paul expects believers in Christ to align. This book will be of great value to biblical scholars and students with interests in biblical Greek, functional linguistics, appraisal theory, hermeneutics, exegesis, and 1 Corinthians.
Author: Silvia Luraghi
In Experiential Verbs in Homeric Greek:.A Constructional Approach Silvia Luraghi offers a comprehensive account of construction variation with two-place verbs belonging to different sub-domains of experience (including bodily sensation, perception, cognition, emotion and volitionality) in the Homeric language. Traditionally, variation is ascribed to the independent meaning of cases that mark the second argument, and explanations have focused on properties of the latter. By taking a constructional approach, the author shows that construction variation also brings about differences in the conceptualization of the subject/experiencer by pointing to different degrees of control and awareness. Variation is then shown to reflect the embodied construal of experience along with the social dimension of emotions.
A Commentary based on Paroimiai in Codex Vaticanus
Author: Al Wolters
In the Proverbs volume in the Septuagint Commentary Series Al Wolters gives a meticulous philological commentary on the text of Proverbs as found in the important fourth-century Codex Vaticanus, together with a careful transcription of the Vaticanus Greek text and a fresh English translation thereof. The focus of the commentary is on the semantic and grammatical aspects of the Greek, relying primarily on general Greek usage rather than on the underlying Hebrew, and drawing on a broad array of lexicographical and grammatical resources, as well as a detailed examination of twelve previous translations of LXX Proverbs. In the process, many new interpretations of the often difficult Greek are proposed.
Author: Hayeon Kim
For hundreds of years, disputes on the origin of the Septuagint, a biblical text that was translated from Hebrew into Greek in the third century BCE, and the number of its translators have been ongoing. In Multiple Authorship of the Septuagint Pentateuch, Hayeon Kim provides a clear solution to the unsolved questions, using an objective and consistent set of translation-technique criteria, and traditional and computerized tools of analysis. According to the author, the translation of the Septuagint Pentateuch has two facets: homogeneity and heterogeneity. The common socio-religious milieu of the translators is apparent in the similar translation techniques, however, the individual characters of the five translators are also evident in their distinct translation styles.
Antidorus, Dionysius Iambus, Epigenes, Lysanias, Parmenon, Silenus, Simaristus, Simmias
SGG 1 offers the first critical edition of, and commentaries on, the textual fragments of the ancient Greek grammarians Antidorus, Dionysius Iambus, Epigenes, Lysanias, Parmenon, Silenus, Simaristus, and Sim(m)ias. All of these personalities belong, or so plausibly appear, to the early Hellenistic period (3rd-2nd centuries BC) and share a special interest in glossographical issues (mainly discussions of problems concerning lexical usages and customs, in Greek literature as well as in ordinary life of their times) and/or in literary history. Each entry includes: a biographical and cultural profile of the grammarian; the text of testimonies and fragments critically edited, translated, and analytically commented on; a thorough bibliography; and indices. Translation, critical apparatus, and commentary are in Italian.
An Exploration of Literary Divergence in Greek Narrative Discourse
Author: Andrew W. Pitts
Unlike contemporary literary-linguistic configurations of genre, current methodologies for the study of the Gospel genre are designed only to target genre similarities not genre differences. This basic oversight results in the convoluted discussion we witness in Lukan genre study today. Each recent treatment of the genre of Luke-Acts represents a distinct effort to draw parallels between Luke-Acts and a specific (or multiple) literary tradition(s). These studies all underestimate the role of literary divergence in genre analysis, leveraging much—if not, all—of their case on literary proximity. This monograph will show how attention to literary divergence from a number of angles may bring resolution to the increasingly complex discussions of the genre(s) of Luke-Acts.