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Ibrāhīm al-Kūrānī’s (d. 1101/1690) Theology of Sufism
Author: Naser Dumairieh
In Intellectual Life in the Ḥijāz before Wahhabism, Naser Dumairieh argues that, as a result of changing global conditions facilitating the movement of scholars and texts, the seventeenth-century Ḥijāz was one of the most important intellectual centers of the Islamic world, acting as a hub between its different parts.
Positioning Ibrāhīm al-Kūrānī (d. 1101/1690) as representative of the intellectual activities of the pre-Wahhabism Ḥijāz, Dumairieh argues that his coherent philosophical system represents a synthesis of several major post-classical traditions of Islamic thought, namely kalām and Akbarian appropriations of Avicennian metaphysics. Al-Kūrānī’s work is the culmination of the philosophized Akbarian tradition; with his reconciliation of Ibn ʿArabī’s ideas with Ashʿarī theology, Ibn ʿArabī’s ideas became Islamic theology.
Author: Gerrit Bos
This edition contains the collected English translations of the series The Medical Works of Moses Maimonides (17 vols., 2002–2021) that were published by Gerrit Bos in parallel critical editions along with the original Arabic texts. The collection offers three main medical treatises by Maimonides (1138–1204) ( Medical Aphorisms; Commentary on Hippocrates’ Aphorisms; On Poisons and the Protection against Lethal Drugs and six minor ones ( On Coitus; On the Regimen of Health; On the Elucidation of Some Symptoms and the Response to Them; On Hemorrhoids; On Asthma; On Rules Regarding the Practical Part of the Medical Art, presented for the first time in one harmonized volume, supplemented by indexes of diseases, medicinal ingredients, and quoted physicians.
Studies, Editions, Translations
Abū Ḥafṣ ʿUmar al-Suhrawardī (1145-1234) is the author of a classic work of Muslim piety, a key figure in the rise of institutional Sufism in the form of “orders” called “ṭarīqas,” and the influential eponym of one of these famous orders. This book presents studies, editions, and English translations of his shorter treatises that were originally penned in Arabic and Persian. Relying on global archival research, the book discovers materials that shed new light on his teachings and networks, as it traces the context, sources, and reception of his works. Carefully identifying the authentic works of ʿUmar al-Suhrawardī, the book presents significant new information on a key moment in the history of Muslim piety and mysticism.
Volume I: Graeco-Syriaca and Arabica / Volume II: Islamic Philosophy / Volume III: From God´s Wisdom to Science: A. Islamic Theology and Sufism, B. History of Science / Volume IV: Islam, Europe and Beyond: A. Islam and the Middle Ages. B. Manuscripts, a B
Author: Hans Daiber
From the Greeks to the Arabs and Beyond written by Hans Daiber, is a six volume collection of Daiber’s scattered writings, journal articles, essays and encyclopaedia entries on Greek-Syriac-Arabic translations, Islamic theology and Sufism, the history of science, Islam in Europe, manuscripts and the history of oriental studies. The collection contains published (since 1967) and unpublished works in English, German, Arabic, Persian and Turkish, including editions of Arabic and Syriac texts. The publication mirrors the intercultural character of Islamic thought and sheds new light on many aspects ranging from the Greek pre-Socratics to the Malaysian philosopher Naquib al-Attas. A main concern is the interpretation of texts in print or in manuscripts, culminating in two catalogues (Vol. V and VI), which contain descriptions of newly discovered, mainly Arabic, manuscripts in all fields.
Vol. I: Graeco-Syriaca and Arabica.
Vol. II: Islamic Philosophy.
Vol. III: From God’s Wisdom to Science: A. Islamic Theology and Sufism; B. History of Science.
Vol. IV: Islam, Europe and Beyond: A. Islam and Middle Ages; B. Manuscripts – a Basis of Knowledge and Science; C. History of the Discipline; D. Obituaries; E. Indexes.
Vol. V: Unknown Arabic Manuscripts from Eight Centuries – Including one Hebrew and Two Ethiopian Manuscripts: Daiber Collection III.
Vol. VI: Arabic, Syriac, Persian and Latin Manuscripts on Philosophy, Theology, Science and Literature. Films and Offprints: Daiber Collection IV.
Critical Editions of the Translation by Moses Ibn Tibbon and the Translation Ascribed to Rabbi Jacob, with an Introduction and Glossary. Books I–II
Author: Ofer Elior
Euclid's Elements is one of the canonical texts that shaped our cultural heritage. It was translated from Greek into Arabic and from Arabic into Hebrew and Latin. There is little agreement about the textual history of the Arabic translations. The present book offers for the first time a critical edition of two Hebrew translations of Books I–II, by Moses Ibn Tibbon and by "Rabbi Jacob". A serious attempt is made to learn from the Hebrew translations also about the history of the Arabic text. The edition of Ibn Tibbon's translation is accompanied by an Arabic text which was probably its source. Rabbi Jacob's translation is compared to the Latin translation ascribed to Adelard of Bath, probably based on the same Arabic tradition.
Volume Editor: Peter Pormann
This collection of article presents cutting-edge scholarship in Hippocratic studies in English from an international range of experts. It pays special attention to the commentary tradition, notably in Syriac and Arabic, and its relevance to the constitution and interpretation of works in the Hippocratic Corpus. It presents new evidence from hitherto unpublished sources, including Greek papyri and Syriac and Arabic manuscripts. It encompasses not only the classical period (and notably Galen), but also tackles evidence from the medieval and Renaissance periods.

Contributors are: Elizabeth Craik, David Leith, Tommaso Raiola, Jacques Jouanna, Caroline Magdelaine, Jean-Michel Mouton, Peter N. Singer, R. J. Hankinson, Ralph M. Rosen, Daniela Manetti, Mathias Witt, Amneris Roselli, Véronique Boudon-Millot, Sabrina Grimaudo, Giulia Ecca, Kamran I. Karimullah, María Teresa Santamaría Hernández, and Jesús Ángel y Espinós.
Volume Editors: Rodrigo Adem and Edmond Hayes
This volume advances the critical study of exegetical, doctrinal, and political authority in Shiʿi Islam. Naive dichotomies of “reason” and “esotericism” in Islamic Studies have often marginalized Shiʿi thought or impeded its understanding. The studies presented here aim to foster more exacting frameworks for interpreting the diverse modes of rationality and esotericism in Twelver and Ismaili Shiʿism and the socio-epistemic values they represent within Muslim discourse.

The volume’s contributions highlight the cross-sectarian genealogy of early Shiʿi esotericism; the rationale behind Fatimid Ismaili Quranic taʿwīl hermeneutics; the socio-political context of religious authority in nascent Twelver Shiʿism; authorial agency wielded by Imami hadith compilers; the position of esoteric Shiʿi traditions in Timurid-era Ḥilla; and Shiʿi-Sufi relations with Uṣūlī jurists in modern Iran.

Contributors: Rodrigo Adem, Alessandro Cancian, Edmund Hayes, Sajjad Rizvi, Tahera Qutbuddin, Paul Walker, George Warner
Volume 3: From God´s Wisdom to Science: A. Islamic Theology and Sufism, B. History of Science
Author: Hans Daiber
From the Greeks to the Arabs and Beyond written by Hans Daiber, is a six volume collection of Daiber’s scattered writings, journal articles, essays and encyclopaedia entries on Greek-Syriac-Arabic translations, Islamic theology and Sufism, the history of science, Islam in Europe, manuscripts and the history of oriental studies. The collection contains published (since 1967) and unpublished works in English, German, Arabic, Persian and Turkish, including editions of Arabic and Syriac texts. The publication mirrors the intercultural character of Islamic thought and sheds new light on many aspects ranging from the Greek pre-Socratics to the Malaysian philosopher Naquib al-Attas. A main concern is the interpretation of texts in print or in manuscripts, culminating in two catalogues (Vol. V and VI), which contain descriptions of newly discovered, mainly Arabic, manuscripts in all fields.
Vol. I: Graeco-Syriaca and Arabica.
Vol. II: Islamic Philosophy.
Vol. III: From God’s Wisdom to Science: A. Islamic Theology and Sufism; B. History of Science.
Vol. IV: Islam, Europe and Beyond: A. Islam and Middle Ages; B. Manuscripts – a Basis of Knowledge and Science; C. History of the Discipline; D. Obituaries; E. Indexes.
Vol. V: Unknown Arabic Manuscripts from Eight Centuries – Including one Hebrew and Two Ethiopian Manuscripts: Daiber Collection III.
Vol. VI: Arabic, Syriac, Persian and Latin Manuscripts on Philosophy, Theology, Science and Literature. Films and Offprints: Daiber Collection IV.

الخلاصة

‫يبرهن البحث أن فكرة الحرية كانت حاضرة ومؤثرة في التشريع الإسلامي، وأنها انتقلت مع الحنفية من مجرد فكرة عامة إلى كونها مفهوماً محدداً ذا نطاق مفتوح على مسائل الاجتماع والاقتصاد والأسرة والسياسة والقضاء، وأخذت عندهم موقعاً مركزياً ضمن منظومة المصالح والحقوق. يخلص البحث إلى أن مفهوم الحرية عند الحنفية تأسس على ثلاثة أركان: يتمثل الأول في تفسير المصالح بوصفها حريات ومنافع، وهو ما جعل للحرية تأثيراً كبيراً في التشريع ومناهج الاجتهاد، ويتمثل الثاني في تقعيد الحقوق الأصلية للإنسان ضمن مثلث الحياة والحرية والملكية، ثم ربط الحرية بخواص الآدمية واعتبارها ضماناً لبقاء العالم والمجتمعات على الوجه الأكمل، وأنها شطر الحكمة من خلق البشر ونزول الشريعة، بينما يتمثل الركن الثالث بشبكة مفاهيم حافة ومؤثرة في تعريف الحرية وحدودها وآفاقها، وهي: البقاء، والآدمية، والأمانة، والمنفعة، والعبادة، والعقل والقوة.‬

Open Access
In: Journal of Islamic Ethics