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The Baltic Yearbook of International Law – the first legal journal in the field and sub fields of international law – is published under the auspices of the Baltic Editorial Board within the framework of cooperation between the Riga Graduate School of Law and Brill/Nijhoff Publishers. The Yearbook aims to bring to the international debate issues that are of importance in the Baltic States, providing a forum for views on topical international law themes from Baltic and international scholars. The first volume appeared in 2001 with a symposium on the question of the international legal status of the Baltic States.

The Yearbook contains state practice reports from Estonia, Latvia and Lithuania, thus serving as an important source of international law that is unavailable elsewhere. From time to time the Yearbook offers articles discussing the history of international law and current issues in Eastern Europe and the Russian Federation, thus making regional discourse more accessible to a wider global audience.

Volume 19 is devoted to the theme: Latvian tradition in international law. Concepts such as statehood, State continuity, State responsibility, equal participation in international decision-making and recently rule of law in international law and consolidation of legal regulation at an international level in different fields of cooperation, have been of relevance and interest both in practice and academic research in the field of international law in Latvia. The volume contains a selection of articles introducing historical and current research on these and other related issues.
This is a collection of international law materials relating to the Philippines: excerpts of treaties and declarations; international judicial and arbitral decisions; and Philippine constitutional clauses, statutes and Supreme Court decisions.

Today new theories abound, calling for comparative perspectives that look at International Law through the lens of national and regional practice. This book engages that challenge at a concrete level, e.g., how the Marcos human rights abuses were litigated abroad but never in Philippine courts, and how victim claims for reparations are, ironically, blocked by the Philippine Government citing the Filipino people’s competing claims over Marcoses' ill-gotten wealth. It retells Philippine history using international law, and re-examines international law using the Philippine experience.
Editor: Dire Tladi
Peremptory Norms of General International Law (Jus Cogens): Disquisitions and Dispositions brings together an impressive collection of authors addressing both conceptual issues and challenges relating to peremptory norms of general international. Covered themes in the edited collection include concepts relating to the identification of peremptory norms, consequences of peremptory norms, critiques of peremptory norms, the relationship between peremptory norms and particular areas of international law as well as the peremptory status of particular norms of international law. The contributions are presented from an array of scholars and experts with different perspective, thus providing an interesting mosaic of thoughts on peremptory norms. Written against the backdrop of the ongoing work of the International Law Commission, it exposes some tensions inherent in the jus cogens.
Volume IV: Prosecutor v. Sesay, Kallon and Gbao (The RUF Case) (Set of 3)
The Special Court for Sierra Leone was established through signature of a bilateral treaty between the United Nations and the Government of Sierra Leone in early 2002, making it the third modern ad hoc international criminal tribunal. It has tried various persons, including former Liberian President Charles Ghankay Taylor, for serious violations of international humanitarian law committed during the latter half of the Sierra Leonean armed conflict. It completed its work in December 2013. A new Residual Special Court for Sierra Leone, based in Freetown and with offices in The Hague, has been created to carry out its essential “residual” functions.
This volume, which consists of three books and a CD-ROM and is edited by two legal experts on the Sierra Leone Court, completes the set of edited Law Reports started in 2012. Together, the Law Reports fill the gap of a single and authoritative reference source of the tribunal’s jurisprudence. The law reports are intended for national and international judges, lawyers, academics, students and other researchers as well as transitional justice practitioners in courts, tribunals and truth commissions, and anyone seeking an accurate record of the trials conducted by the Special Court for Sierra Leone.

N.B.: The hardback copy of this title contains a CD-ROM with the decisions that are reproduced in the book and the trial transcripts.
The e-book version does not.
The Examples of Scrubber Washwater, Sewage and Ballast Water
Author: Nathalie Rébé
In Artificial Intelligence: Robot Law, Policy and Ethics, Dr. Nathalie Rébé discusses the legal and contemporary issues in relation to creating conscious robots. She argues that AI’s physical and decision-making capacities to act on its own means having to grant it a juridical personality.
The advancement in new technologies forces us to reconsider the role Artificial Intelligence (AI) will have in our society. Sectors such as education, transportation, jobs, sex, business, the military, medical and security will be particularly affected by the development of AI.
This work provides an analysis of cases and existing regulatory tools, which could be used by lawyers in future trials. Dr. Rébé also offers a new comprehensive framework to regulate Strong AI so that ‘it’ can safely live among humans.
This book is a response to two questions: first, should we ban or prohibit AI; and, secondly, if not, what should be the salient features of a legal or regulatory framework for AI?
Le droit international à la lumière de la pratique: l’introuvable théorie de la réalité. Cours général de droit international public, par A. PELLET, professeur émérite de l’Université Paris-Nanterre.
Ce cours général s’efforce de présenter un panorama synthétique du droit international tel qu’il est appliqué en ce premier quart du XXIe siècle. L’auteur considère le droit comme un outil irremplaçable de pacification des relations internationales et de coexistence entre les acteurs (que l’on ne saurait limiter aux seuls États). Il ne s’interdit pas de critiquer les doctrines qui se bornent à fustiger le droit positif sans faire aucune proposition constructive pour l’améliorer, qui l’utilisent à des fins politiques, ou qui l’abordent sous le prisme déformant de spécialisations trop étroites. Il constate qu’aucune théorie ne rend pleinement compte de la diversité de ses règles, des mécanismes de leur formation ou de leur mise en œuvre, qui ne peut être appréhendée par le biais d’une approche dogmatique.
Globalization, Personal Jurisdiction and the Internet. Responding to the Challenge of adapting settled Principles and Precedents. General Course of Private International Law, by P. D. TROOBOFF.