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Übersetzung und wissenschaftliche Redaktion von Bernard Wiaderny
Editor / Translator: Bernard Wiaderny
Zwei führende polnische Zeithistoriker schildern die jüngste Geschichte ihres Landes vom deutschen Überfall 1939 bis zur Gegenwart.
Andrzej Friszke und Antoni Dudek sind nicht nur namhafte polnische Historiker, sondern auch Zeitzeugen und scharfe Beobachter der aktuellen politischen Entwicklung ihres Landes. Mit dem Schwerpunkt auf Politik- und Sozialgeschichte geben sie einen Überblick über die Geschicke des Landes, beginnend mit der Zeit der deutschen Besatzung Polens, und die Etablierung des kommunistischen Systems. Die Rolle der Opposition und der katholischen Kirche in der Volksrepublik, die Entstehung der Gewerkschaft „Solidarność“ (an der Friszke aktiv beteiligt war) sowie die politische Transformation seit 1989 werden breit behandelt. Besonderen Wert gewinnt das Buch durch die Berücksichtigung der zeithistorisch bislang kaum erfassten 2000er Jahre.
This is the first biography of Barbara of Cilli (1392-1451), Hungarian, Roman-German and Bohemian queen through her marriage to King and later Emperor Sigismund of Luxembourg (1368-1437). While Emperor Sigismund has enjoyed substantial historical attention, Barbara has remained in his shadow, despite her significant political, economic, and cultural influence.

Barbara’s image is still preserved today as the "Black Queen" or the "German Messalina". She has been transformed into a mystical or even demonic figure in folklore – a prime example of the creation and functioning of historical stereotypes – yet as a historical figure she emerges as an influential and exceptional queen.
Volume Editors: Dušan Zupka and Grischa Vercamer
This book provides the first detailed overview of research on rulership in theory and practice, with a particular emphasis on the monarchies of Bohemia, Hungary and Poland in the High and Late Middle Ages. The contributions examine the legitimation of rule of the first local dynasties, the ritual practice of power, the ruling strategies and practices of power in the established monarchies, and the manifold influences on the rulership in East Central Europe from outside the region (such as from Byzantium, and the Holy Roman Empire). The collection shows that these ideas and practices enabled the new polities to become legitimate members of Latin Christendom.
The Policy of Belarusization, 1924-1929
Author: Alena Marková
The book sheds light on processes of Belarusian nation-building and identity formation during the interwar period. It provides a complete analysis of the Soviet policy of Belarusization in interwar Belarus (1924-1929).

The analysis covers issues pertaining to the formation of national identity, the incorporation of the Belarusian national language into educational and administrative spheres within the policy of Belarusization and its acceptance by the dif-
ferent strata of the multi-ethnic society in the BSSR of that period. The monograph also sheds light on the reasons for the launching and ceasing of that policy as well as on the interrelation between the Communist Party and the
Belarusian national intelligentsia.
Series Editors: Christina Lodder and Jeffrey Brooks
Original work on the culture and history of Russia throughout the centuries; cultural, ethnic and national identity, social and political history, popular culture, visual and performing arts, architecture and cinema, gender studies, children and youth culture, oral history and memory.

Until Volume 22, the series was published by Brill, click here.

The series published an average of 1,5 volumes per year over the last 5 years.
The author displays the complex constitutional history of Serbia as a case study, following the evolution of the most important concepts such as human rights and the rule of law.
The first part of the book („Developments“) displays the main events as a chronological narrative, also giving a sketch of the history of Serbian legal institutions. The second part („The Evolution of Constitutionalism“) follows the evolution of two principal constitutional concepts i.e. human rights and the rule of law in Serbia. The third part („Serbia and Yugoslavia“) analyses the specific historical dimensions of Serbian constitutionalism in its relationship with the history of the Balkan peninsula.
Roma Writings
Open Access
Romani Literature and Press in Central, South-Eastern and Eastern Europe from the 19th Century until World War II
The book focuses on the early period of Roma publishing (from the nineteenth century until the Second World War) when the first original texts, fiction and media publications authored by Roma appeared.

Based on extensive archival and historical research, including the discovery of earlier, up to now unknown sources, the literary activities of Roma in Central, South-eastern and Eastern Europe are discussed in their historical context and interrelation with the birth of the Roma emancipatory movement. Romani literature and press are thus embedded in the history and literary studies of the European national literatures.
Everyday Life under Occupation in World War II Europe: A Source Edition
Volume Editors: Tatjana Tönsmeyer and Peter Haslinger
During the peak of the German expansion in World War II, more than 230 million people from Norway to Greece and from France to various regions inside the former Soviet Union lived under German occupation. This edited collection of primary sources for the first time gives an insight into the experiences of these ordinary people under German occupation, their everyday life and how this quickly became dominated by shortages (especially of food but also of other necessities such as medicine), the search for supplies and different strategies to fight scarcity. In addressing examples from all European countries under German occupation the collected sources give the first pan-European perspective on the history of shortage, malnutrition and hunger resulting from the war, occupation, and aggressive German exploitation policies.
Author: Roumen Daskalov
This volume offers a history of historiography, as Roumen Daskalov presents a critical analysis of Bulgarian historiographical views of the Middle Ages to reveal their embeddedness in their historical context and their adaptation to the contemporary circumstances. The study traces the establishment of a master narrative of the Bulgarian Middle Ages and its evolution over time to the present day, including the attempt at a Marxist counter-narrative. Daskalov uses categories of master national narratives, which typically are stories of origins and migrations, state foundations and rises (“golden ages”), and decline and fall, yet they also assert the continuity of the “people”, present certain historical personalities (good or evil, “great” or “weak”), and describe certain actions or passivity to others' actions.