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This collection sheds light on diverse forms of collective engagement among young people. Recent developments in youth studies, and the changing global shape of socio-economic conditions for young people, demand new approaches and ideas. Contributors focus on novel processes, practices and routines within youth collectivity in various contexts across the globe, including Indonesia, Spain, Italy, Norway and Poland. The chapters pay particular attention to transitional phases in the lives of young people. Conceptually, the book also explores the strengths and limitations of a focus on collectivity in youth studies. Ultimately, the book makes the case for a focus on forms of collectivity and engagement to help scholars think through contemporary experiences of shared social life among young people.

Contributors are: Duncan Adam, Massimiliano Andretta, Roberta Bracciale, David Cairns, Diego Carbajo Padilla, Enzo Colombo, Valentina Cuzzocrea, Carles Feixa, Ben Gook, Izabela Grabowska, Natalia Juchniewicz, Ewa Krzaklewska, Wolfgang Lehmann, Michelle Mansfield, María Martinez, Ann Nilsen, Rebecca Raby, Paola Rebughini, Birgit Reißig, Bjørn Schiermer, Tabea Schlimbach, Melanie Simms, Benjamín Tejerina, Kristoffer C Vogt, and Natalia Waechter.
In From Online Platforms to Digital Monopolies: Technology, Information and Power Jonas C.L. Valente discusses the rise of platforms as key players in different social activities, from economy to culture and politics. These companies have a daily presence in the lives of the majority of the world population, from social interactions to digital payments and transactions. They are gaining a central role in neoliberal capitalism, shaping contemporary sociability.

The book shows how these platforms work and identifies the hidden interests behind the commercial strategies that guide the development of services offered to Internet users. It takes the specific cases of Google and Facebook and presents its historical development, illustrating how these companies turned into major players in our times.
Series Editor: Otmar Weiss
International Studies in Sport and Society is a peer-reviewed book series that investigates the relationship between sport and society. In today’s modern world, with its ethnically and culturally diverse populations, the role of sport as a vehicle for cultural dialogue is of particular interest. Due to the growing importance of sport, the exploration of its sociocultural, sociopolitical, and socioeconomic functions is becoming an increasingly essential task for the sociology of sport. In this context, a new scientific orientation has evolved, accompanied by new perspectives for research activities concerning the development of sport over time and its differentiation across different societies. The cooperation between international scholars in the framework of the series has an identity-forming potential for the sociology of sport. The scientists involved in the series, consisting not only of sport sociologists but also experts from the neighbor disciplines of general sociology, psychology, anthropology, and economy, contribute to building international networks in the forefront of the sociology of sport, so that both the circulation of knowledge and future research collaborations become possible. Against this background, International Studies in Sport and Society aims to illustrate sport sociological topics, theories, and research findings to readers around the world.

International Studies in Sport and Society has value primarily for researchers, educators, and students active in sociology and various adjacent fields concerned with sport, to include but not limited to education, governance, and the natural sciences, as well as for representatives of sport organizations, policy makers, and sport industry professionals.

Manuscripts should be at least 80,000 words in length (including footnotes and bibliography). Manuscripts may also include illustrations and other visual material. The editors will consider proposals for original monographs, edited collections, translations, and critical primary source editions.

Authors are cordially invited to submit proposals and/or full manuscripts by email to the publisher Jason Prevost. Please direct all other correspondence to Associate Editor Jennifer Obdam.

Authors will find general proposal guidelines at the Brill Author Gateway.
Author: Ezgi B. Ünsal
In Constructing Change, Ezgi B. Unsal provides a political economy of electricity and housing provision in Turkey. By using the case studies of electricity and housing in Turkey, the book explores how social provision is increasingly commodified across the globe as a defining feature of financialisation. Distinguishing this trend from macroeconomic definitions of financialisation, the book offers a contextual narrative of economic change in Turkey, with undetermined macroeconomic outcomes. It contributes to the literature on the financialisation of social provision and the political economy of Turkey, by confirming the increasing influence of finance on social provision sectors, making them prone to volatility while contributing to their growth at the same time.
Volume Editors: Håkon Leiulfsrud and Peter Sohlberg
The third volume on theoretical driven methodology in the social sciences, again edited by Håkon Leiulfsrud and Peter Sohlberg, explains how to identify sociological research objects, and the art of living theory. Theoretical concepts such as social structure, the Global South, social bonds, organisations and management are explore and developed by a broad range of authors. The methodological chapters, including critical notes on sociology and uses of statistics, the value of thought experiments in sociology, researching subjects in time and space, and an academic 'star war' between Pierre Bourdieu and Dorothy E. Smith are indispensible for researchers and students interested in theoretical construction work in the social sciences.

Contributors are: Göran Ahrne, Michela Betta, Harriet Bjerrum Nielsen, Michael Burawoy, Raju Das, David Fasenfest, Raimund Hasse, Johs Hjellbrekke, Håkon Leiulfsrud, Emil A. Røyrvik, John Scott, Peter Sohlberg, Karin Widerberg and Richard Swedberg.
Series Editor: Chaime Marcuello-Servós
We are living in turbulent times in which we need to face global challenges connecting fields and perspectives. Complex social issues require complex, multidisciplinary approaches to deal with their complexity. In recent decades, sociocybernetics has developed as a distinct discipline that aims to meet this challenge. Sociocybernetics is concerned with applying first and second order cybernetics, the systems sciences and complexity science in the social sciences. Brill Research Perspectives in Sociocybernetics and Complexity disseminates advances in sociocybernetics and consolidates existing research efforts, including theory and applications. Each installment addresses developments around a specific topic; thus, besides the audience interested in developments in sociocybernetics and the complexity sciences, each installment appeals to those in other disciplines who are engaged with a particular topic. The topics addressed range from foundational issues to applications in systems modelling, the arts, social interventions, environmental problems, social work and care, public policies, and urban design, on a local or global scale. Brill Research Perspectives in Sociocybernetics and Complexity is an invaluable resource for scholars, policymakers and practitioners wishing to learn about the latest developments in sociocybernetics, as well as a useful resource for teachers and those studying the social sciences and related disciplines.

Each installment is a focused monograph of approximately 30,000-40,000 words (70-100 pages) presenting the state of the art on a specific theme in close combination with critical analysis and research.

Authors are cordially invited to submit proposals and/or full manuscripts by email to the publisher Jason Prevost. Please direct all other correspondence to Associate Editor Debbie de Wit.
Author: Xuefeng He
Translator: Jingyan Yuan
Based on an in-depth investigation of different regions of China's vast countryside, Improving Village Governance in Contemporary China vividly describes rural governance mechanisms against the background of China's rapid urbanization. China’s rural areas vary greatly from region to region with respect to the pace and mode of change. Rural governance in China is decided by how the state transfers resources to villages, and by the linkage between the transfer style and the specific situation of each village. Only when grassroots governance is based on rural democracy (with peasants as the core) can villages become more harmonious.
Written in dialogue format, Andrew Fitz-Gibbon’s Pragmatic Nonviolence argues that nonviolence is the best hope for a better world. Human violence in all its forms—physical, psychological and systemic-cultural—is perhaps the greatest obstacle to well-being in personal and community life. Nonviolence as “a practice that, whenever possible, seeks the well-being of the Other, by refusing to use violence to solve problems, and by acting according to loving kindness” is the best antidote to human violence. By drawing on the philosophy of nonviolence, the American pragmatist tradition and recent empirical research, Pragmatic Nonviolence demonstrates that, rather than being merely theoretical, nonviolence is a truly practical approach toward personal and community well-being.
The EU Party Democracy and the Challenge of National Populism
Volume Editors: Radu Carp and Cristina Matiuța
This volume aims to provide consolidated analyses of the 2019 European elections and explanations about the future of the European party system, in a context in which the EU has to face many challenges, including the erosion of electoral support for mainstream parties and the increasing success of populist parties. The structure of the book is designed to combine the overall view on the role of elections in shaping the future European project with relevant case studies.

The reader is given a perspective not only on the results of the European Parliament elections as such, but also on how these results are related to national trends which pre-exist and what kind of collateral effects on the quality of democracy they could have.

Contributors include: Jan Bíba, Sorin Bocancea, Dóra Bókay, Radu Carp, József Dúró, Tomáš Dvořák, Alexandra Alina Iancu, Ruxandra Ivan, Petra Jankovská, Małgorzata Madej, Cristina Matiuța, Sergiu Mișcoiu, Valentin Naumescu, Gianluca Piccolino, Leonardo Puleo, Alexandru Radu, Mihai Sebe, Sorina Soare, Tobias Spöri, Jeremias Stadlmair, Martin Štefek, Piotr Sula, and Jaroslav Ušiak.
This book constitutes a sociological research on the current “narrations” of the economic and refugee crisis which has mobilized all the aspects of social storytelling during the last decade, most particularly in the European South. Because the different (mass and social) media reflect the dominant ideas and representations, the research on the meaning of different media narratives becomes a necessary report for the understanding of the relation (or “inexistent dialogue”?) between official political discourses and popular myths (based on everyday life values of prosperity, mostly promoted by the mass culture and the cultural industries’ products). Despite the ongoing inequalities and difficulties, the contemporary audiences seem to counterbalance misery by the dreams of happiness, provided by this kind of products.

Contributors include: Christiana Constantopoulou, Amalia Frangiskou, Evangelia Kalerante, Laurence Larochelle, Debora Marcucci, Valentina Marinescu, Albertina Pretto, Maria Thanopoulou, Joanna Tsiganou, Vasilis Vamvakas, and Eleni Zyga.