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Translator: Ian Barnett
In Co-operative Struggles, Denise Kasparian expands the theoretical horizons regarding labour unrest by proposing new categories to make visible and conceptualize conflicts in the new worker co-operativism of the twenty-first century.
br/> After the depletion of neoliberal reforms at the dawn of the twenty-first century in Argentina, co-operativism gained momentum, mainly due to the recuperation of enterprises by their workers and state promotion of co-operatives through social policies. These new co-operatives became actors not just in production but in social struggle. Their peculiarity lies in the fact that they shape a socio-productive form not structured on wage relations: workers are at the same time members of the organisations. Why, how and by what cleavages and groupings do these co-operative workers without bosses come into conflict?
Overview of Social Policy in Serbia and Kosovo
Volume Editor: Marzena Żakowska
The book offers a comprehensive overview of social security in the Balkan states. Social security is presented from a broad perspective as a mechanism that addresses human needs, provides protection against social risks, reduces social tensions and secures peace. Various sectors of social policy, pension systems, health care systems, disability insurance, labor policy as well as social risks, such as poverty and unemployment have been analyzed from historical, economic, political, sociological and security perspective. The book also offers recommendations for improving the level of social security in the region.

Contributors are: Dritero Arifi, Ngadhnjim Brovina, Pëllumb Çollaku, Dorota Domalewska, Besnik Fetahu, Remzije Istrefi, Maja Jandrić, Afet Mamuti, Gordana Matković, Ruzhdi Morina, Artan Mustafa, Katarina Stanić, and Marzena Żakowska.
An Overview of Social Policy in the Republics of North Macedonia and Montenegro
Volume Editors: Marzena Żakowska and Dorota Domalewska
The book offers a comprehensive overview of social security in the Balkan states. Social security is presented from a broad perspective as a mechanism that addresses human needs, provides protection against social risks, reduces social tensions and secures peace. Various sectors of social policy, pension systems, health care systems, disability insurance, labor policy as well as social risks, such as poverty and unemployment have been analyzed from historical, economic, political, sociological and security perspective. The book also offers recommendations for improving the level of social security in the region.

Contributors are: Maja Bacović, Agata Domachowska, Dorota Domalewska, Tomasz Ferfecki, Afet Mamuti, Katerina Mitevska Petrusheva, Natalija Perišić, Kire Sharlamanov, Katerina Veljanovska Blazhevska, and Marzena Żakowska.
An Overview of Social Policy in Croatia, Albania, Bosnia and Hercegovina, Greece, Romania and Bulgaria
Volume Editors: Marzena Żakowska and Dorota Domalewska
This book offers a comprehensive overview of social security in the Balkan states. Social security is presented from a broad perspective as a mechanism that addresses human needs, provides protection against social risks, reduces social tensions and secures peace. Various sectors of social policy, pension systems, health care systems, disability insurance, labor policy as well as social risks, such as poverty and unemployment have been analyzed from historical, economic, political, sociological and security perspective. The book also offers recommendations for improving the level of social security in the region.

Contributors are: Predrag Bejaković, Mirela Cristea, Dorota Domalewska, Nikos Kourachanis, Effrosyni E. Kouskouna, Christos Koutsampelas, Velibor Lalić, Shkëlzen Macukulli, Irina Mindova Docheva, Grațiela Georgiana Noja, Teuta Nunaj Kortoci, Mile Šikman, Aspasia Strantzalou, Nevenko Vranješ, and Marzena Żakowska.
The Evolution of the Israeli Third Sector reviews the development of the nonprofit sector in Israel and analyzes it within existing nonprofit theories. It takes a historical perspective in looking at its evolution, in light of political, social, ideological, and economic changes in the world and in the country. It discusses the development of policy and government involvement on the one hand and the unique features of Israeli philanthropy, both Jewish and Arab, on the other. It analyzes Israel’s civil society and social movements as well as social entrepreneurship and their expression in the Third Sector. The book also covers the development of research and education on the Third Sector; it includes a review of research centers, databases, journals, and specific programs that were developed by Israeli universities.

Abstract

The expansion and development of the nonprofit sector worldwide in the 1980s and 1990s did not bypass Israel, and, as in other countries, sparked an interest for study to uncover its characteristics and major features.

The Israeli population—both Jewish and Arab—has a rich tradition of voluntaristic activity on the individual as well as on the collective (organizational) levels, mostly in the communal context. The modern welfare state created new opportunities and new challenges for such activity within the broad framework of the nonprofit sector.

This article aims to review the development of the nonprofit sector in Israel and analyze it within existing nonprofit theories. It takes a historical perspective in looking at its evolution, in light of political, social, ideological, and economic changes in the world and in the country. It discusses the development of policy and government involvement on the one hand and the unique features of Israeli philanthropy, both Jewish and Arab, on the other. It analyzes Israel’s civil society and social movements, as well as social entrepreneurship and their expression in the Third Sector. The article also covers the development of research and education on the Third Sector; it includes a review of research centers, databases, journals, and specific programs that were developed by Israeli universities. Finally, this article summarizes the characteristics of the nonprofit sector in Israel.

In: The Evolution of the Israeli Third Sector
Author: Qun Wang

Abstract

This study examines differentiated government control over foundations in China. The distinct patterns of “Harmonious Society” and “obeying the law” in foundation mission statements indicate a two-dimensional control mechanism in which the government intends to seek functional conformity and behavioral conformity from foundations. Using the multinomial logistic regression method on the mission statement of 2,498 foundations from 2004 to 2013, this article finds that foundations’ funding-sufficiency leads to the government’s strong intention for functional conformity and weak intention for behavioral conformity. The article implies that the Chinese government has eased some institutional constraints on foundations for the purpose of seeking financial contributions from foundations. It suggests that the Chinese government can adapt to the socioeconomic conditions and calculate its relations with nongovernmental organizations.

In: The China Nonprofit Review

Abstract

The importance of NGO s’ participation in poverty alleviation has not only been well documented by extensive studies but also confirmed by rich experience both at the international and national levels. In China, the government officially opened its resources to NGO s in combating poverty in 2005, and NGO s are expected to work as important participants in China’s accurate poverty alleviation project, which is the largest anti-poverty campaign launched by the central government since the foundation of PRC. However, empirical data in the paper shows that NGO s’ participation in this ambitious project is at best very limited. Drawing from more than 30 interviews and some other sources of data, this paper argues that it is the nature of poverty alleviation in China, which can be defined as political task, that should account for the NGO’s limited participation. To be more specific, the excessive workload assumed by the local government deprives officials’ motivation to cooperate with NGO s, excluding NGO s out of the poverty alleviation project is also a rational behavior that can avoid risks for officials. Moreover, the over-supplied financial resource also makes the participation of NGO s unnecessary. This research adds more insights to the study on NGO s in China by arguing that the state-society interaction in China is still asymmetrical.

In: The China Nonprofit Review