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Contributor: Alexander Marr
Descartes and the ‘Ingenium’ tracks the significance of embodied thought ( ingenium) in the philosophical trajectory of the founding father of dualism.
The first part defines the notion ingenium in relation to core concepts of Descartes's philosophy like memory and enumeration. We describe Descartes’s uses of this notion in methodical thinking, mathematics, and medicine. In the second part, we locate the Cartesian ingenium within preceding scholastic and humanist pedagogical and natural-philosophical traditions, and highlight its hitherto ignored social and political significance for Descartes himself as a member of the Republic of Letters.
By embedding Descartes' notion of ingenium in contemporaneous medical, pedagogical, but also social and literary discourses, this volume outlines the fundamentally anthropological and ethical underpinnings of Descartes's revolutionary epistemology.
Contributors are: Igor Agostini, Roger Ariew, Harold J. Cook, Raphaële Garrod, Denis Kambouchner, Alexander Marr, Richard Oosterhoff, David Rabouin, Dennis L. Sepper, Theo Verbeek.
Editor: John Marenbon
This collection looks at the disciplines and their context in the late thirteenth and fourteenth-century universities. Cambridge University, usually forgotten, is made the starting point, from which the essays look out to Oxford and Paris. 1317, when the King’s Scholars (later King’s Hall) were established in Cambridge is the focal date. To this new perspective is added another. Ideas, their formation, development and transformation are studied within their social and institutional context, but with expert attention to their content. Following an Introduction, making the case for the importance of Cambridge (Marenbon), and a study of King’s Hall (Courtenay), the contributions discuss Cambridge books (Thomson), Logic (Ebbesen), Aristotelian science (Costa), Theology (Fitzpatrick and Cross), Medicine (Jacquart) and Law (Helmholz).

The contributors are Richard Cross, Iacopo Costa, William Courtenay, Sten Ebbesen, Antonia Fitzpatrick, R.H. Helmholz, Danielle Jacquart, Philip Knox, and Rodney Thomson.
Author: Juhana Toivanen
In The Political Animal in Medieval Philosophy Juhana Toivanen investigates what medieval philosophers meant when they argued that human beings are political animals by nature. He analyses the notion of ‘political animal’ from various perspectives and shows its relevance to philosophical discussions concerning the foundations of human sociability, ethics, and politics.
Medieval authors believed that social life stems from the biological and rational nature of human beings, and that collaboration with other people promotes prosperity and good life. Toivanen provides a detailed philosophical interpretation of this view across a wide range of authors, including unedited manuscript sources. As the first monograph-length study on the topic, The Political Animal sheds new light on this significant period in western political thought.
In A Historical Study of Anselm's Proslogion, Toivo J. Holopainen offers a new overall interpretation of Anselm’s Proslogion by providing a historical explanation for the distinctive combination of argument and devotion that this treatise exhibits. Part 1 clarifies Anselm’s outlook on the central arguments in the treatise by offering a careful analysis of the ‘single argument’, the discovery of which Anselm announces in the preface. Part 2 reassesses the conflicting views about faith and reason in the immediate background of the Proslogion (the Eucharistic controversy, the publication of the Monologion). Part 3 examines the Proslogion from a rhetorical perspective and argues that applying the ‘single argument’ in a devotional setting constitutes a subtle attempt to affect the audience’s ideas about method in theology.
In Necessary Existence and the Doctrine of Being in Avicenna’s Metaphysics of the Healing Daniel De Haan explicates the central argument of Avicenna’s metaphysical masterpiece. De Haan argues that the most fundamental primary notion in Avicenna’s metaphysics is neither being nor thing but is the necessary ( wājib), which Avicenna employs to demonstrate the existence and true-nature of the divine necessary existence in itself. This conclusion is established through a systematic investigation of how Avicenna’s theory of a demonstrative science is employed in the organization of his metaphysical science into its subject, first principles, and objects of enquiry. The book examines the essential role the first principles as primary notions and primary hypotheses play in the central argument of Avicenna’s metaphysics.
Studies on the Reception of Levi ben Gerson’s Philosophical, Halakhic and Scientific Oeuvre in the 14th through 20th Centuries. Officina Philosophica Hebraica Volume 2
Gersonides’ Afterlife is the first full-scale treatment of the reception of one of the greatest scientific minds of medieval Judaism: Gersonides (1288–1344). An outstanding representative of the Hebrew Jewish culture that then flourished in southern France, Gersonides wrote on mathematics, logic, astronomy, astrology, physical science, metaphysics and theology, and commented on almost the entire bible. His strong-minded attempt to integrate these different areas of study into a unitary system of thought was deeply rooted in the Aristotelian tradition and yet innovative in many respects, and thus elicited diverse and often impassionate reactions. For the first time, the twenty-one papers collected here describe Gersonides’ impact in all fields of his activity and the reactions from his contemporaries up to present-day religious Zionism.
In: Gersonides' Afterlife
In: Gersonides' Afterlife
In: Gersonides' Afterlife
In: Gersonides' Afterlife