Editor: David W. Wood
Presenting new critical perspectives on J.G. Fichte’s Wissenschaftslehre, this volume of English articles by an international group of scholars addresses the topic of first principles in Fichte’s writings. Especially discussed are the central text of his Jena period, the 1794/95 Grundlage der gesammten Wissenschaftslehre, as well as later versions like the Wissenschaftslehre nova methodo (1796-99) and the presentations of 1804 and 1805. Also included are new studies on the first principles of the particular sub-disciplines of Fichte’s system, such as the doctrines of aesthetics, nature, right, ethics, and history.
Contributions from the Second International Conference Graz 1977–2107. In memory of Rudolf Haller
Volume Editors: Mauro Antonelli and Thomas Binder
This volume, originating from the centennial Second International Conference Graz 1977–2017 on Franz Brentano’s philosophy, collects eighteen essays written by nineteen distinguished specialists covering the main areas of Brentano’s philosophy: his epistemology, ontology, ethics, and logic, and his contributions to psychology and philosophy of mind. Its goal is to explore the significance and impact of Brentano’s thought, to promote a deepening of the ongoing renaissance of interest in Brentano, and to advance the project of understanding Brentano’s actual philosophical positions and correcting entrenched misunderstandings.
Proceedings of the Tenth Symposium Platonicum Pragense
Plato's 'Timaeus' brings together a number of studies from both leading Plato specialists and up-and-coming researchers from across Europe. The contributions cover a wide variety of topics, ranging from the literary form of the work to the ontology of sense perception and the status of medicine in Timaeus' account. Although informed by a commitment to methodological diversity, the collection as a whole forms an organic unity, opening fresh perspectives on widely read passages, while shedding new light on less frequently discussed topics. The volume thus provides a valuable resource for students and researchers at all levels, whether their interest bears on the Timaeus as a whole or on a particular passage.
Author: Andrew Oberg
The question of the self, of what the self is (or even if there is a self), has been one that has grown alongside humanity – has haunted humanity – throughout our history. Blurred: Selves Made and Selves Making guides the reader down these dark corridors, shining light on the specters of theories past and unveiling a new self-view to hover afresh, beckoning to roadways beyond.

In this remarkably interdisciplinary study, philosophy of mind joins with contemporary neuroscience and cutting-edge psychology to lay bare the how of identity formation, judgment, and behavior generation. Drawing on thinkers from both the Continental and Analytic traditions, consciousness is explored and a uniquely realist self-concept presented that, if adopted, offers a life lived otherwise.
This edited volume focuses on gender and love as emerging through complex “entanglements and weavings”. At a time when constructionist ideas are losing support, we interrogate theoretical paradigms to assess if constructionist notions still hold value or if new approaches are needed to address the effects of materiality and non-human agency. Without claiming any unison or definite answers, we offer situated, agential cuts into gender and love in various discursive-material phenomena, including Biblical and Rabbinic literature, ecosexual performance art, the writings of Ursula Le Guin and Angela Carter, butch identities, Bengali folktales, Ferzan Özpetek’s cinema, Golem literature, sexual pursuits in Danish nightlife, mother-daughter relationships, women warriors in the PKK, and BDSM performances. Artistic photographer Sara Davidmann has contributed to the book with the cover illustration and a creative afterword including seven photographs on the interaction between the photographer, her studio, and LGBTQ+ people.
Author: Ondřej Krása

Abstract

Bodies are shown to be related to something else from the very beginning of Timaeus’ speech. The original twofold distinction between being and becoming is later on expanded by the addition of a third kind. In this paper, I try to shed some light on the relationship between bodies and the third kind. In the passage dealing with the three kinds (48a–53b) relationship between bodies and the third kind has three prominent facets. First, bodies are “in” the third kind as in a receptacle or container. Second, bodies are modifications of the third kind and therefore parts of the third kind are bodies themselves. Third, bodies are modifications of the third kind that do not prevent other modifications from taking place. At the end of the section 48a–53b, the third kind is identified with space, and starting from line 53b bodies are shown to have a geometrical nature. From this perspective, we can see how the first two facets of the relationship of bodies to the third kind are materialized: a geometrical figure is both in space and it is a modification of space. However, Timaeus’ third characterization of this relationship cannot be explained from this perspective. This inconsistency is due to the different connotations of bodies in both passages. In the passage dealing with the three kinds, bodies are shown to be an utterly dependent image of the eternal paradigm in the receptacle. In the passage dealing with geometrical nature of bodies, body is shown to be an independent and self-sufficient geometrical structure. Neither of these connotations should be rejected, and it is clear that Plato wants us to think about body as an image of eternal being, whose specific independence has a geometrical nature.

In: Plato’s Timaeus

Abstract

The Timaeus apparently assigns a different task to astronomy than that in the educational programme set out in the Republic. There is no word about the reorientation required in the Republic that astronomers should ascend to a post-observational study of “the real decorations [of the heavens]—the real movements that these move by true quickness and true slowness in true number and in all true figures in relation to each other, carrying along the things contained in them, which can be grasped by reason and thought, and not by sight.” (Republic 529d) Nevertheless, I argue that—albeit with vastly different theoretical presuppositions about perceptible entities—the Timaeus takes into consideration some of the strictures of the Republic. Similar to the way the reform of astronomy required in the Republic, only such observational astronomy can pass muster in the Timaeus whose major aim is to reduce the regularities of the motions of the different celestial objects to components that are connected to the fundamental motions of the World Soul. This enterprise can be claimed—within the confines of this likely story—to integrate in its fully developed form every important intellectual pursuit there is.

In: Plato’s Timaeus
Author: Lucius Hartmann

Abstract

The great cosmological speech of Timaios points in comparison to similar written texts of the 4th century to a number of peculiarities, and even inside the corpus Platonicum the text appears singularly. These remarkable features can be explained by the consequent application of the philosophical rhetoric – the soul conducted by words –, conceived by Platon mainly in the dialogs Gorgias and Phaedrus. The most important criteria are knowledge (especially of ideas), a good structure with the definition of central terms, the application of a scientific psychology and a critical attitude to the value of written texts. Timaios, as an exceptionally gifted astronomer, a politically successful orator and a true philosopher meets these requirements nearly perfect.

In: Plato’s Timaeus

Abstract

In this paper my main aim is to argue that Plato in the Timaeus and especially in the section concerning the receptacle advances a theory according to which instances of properties or particular properties contribute to the constitution of material objects, but he does so without compromising his position, found in earlier dialogues, that sensible objects have essences due to immaterial Forms. I will conclude that Plato does not maintain a bundle theory of material objects there and that he is not a bundle theorist. I will try to back up this claim by exploring how Plotinus speaks of the constitution of material objects. Although Plotinus is not directly commenting on the Timaeus, he is inspired, I will suggest, mainly by this dialogue in his explanation of material objects. To the extent that this is the case, Plotinus can be seen as offering a confirmation of my interpretation of the ontology in the Timaeus that is presented in the section concerning the receptacle.

In: Plato’s Timaeus
Author: Tanja Ruben

Abstract

This article defends the claim that Critias’ discourse in the prologue of the Timaeus (20d–26e) introduces not only his own discourse about Atlantis in the Critias, but also that of Timaeus on the origin of the cosmos and the human being. In both cases, the concepts of genos (“family,” “genus,” “species”), chōra (“territory”), and war play a role. There are thus thematic links between the two discourses: the genealogies, the description of the territory of Ancient Athens, and the evocation of its war against Atlantis are taken up and transposed to the cosmic level in Timaeus’ discourse, especially in the second part, where he describes the genesis of the four kinds of perceptible particles in the chōra (48a–68d).

In: Plato’s Timaeus