Browse results

Mit dem auf vier Bände angelegten Werk wird erstmalig eine Ikonologie der christlichen Kunst im historischen Ablauf geschildert. Die komplexe Geschichte des Bildes in der Kirche wird ausgehend von der Intention der Darstellungen auf den verschiedenen Bildträgern aufgezeigt und die Weise der damit verbundenen Argumentation fundiert dargelegt. Eingebettet in allgemeine historische Entwicklungen wird der Wandel der Themenkreise beschrieben. In der Einleitung werden die Prinzipien der Arbeit erläutert. Teil 1 (Alte Kirche) behandelt die Entstehung einer christlichen Bildkunst am Grabe (auf Sarkophagen und in Katakomben) und den späteren Übergang in die Kirchdekoration. Nach gleichen Prinzipien werden in Teil 2 die Bildkunst des Mittelalters, in Teil 3 die der Neuzeit und in Teil 4 die andersartige Entwicklung in der Ostkirche geschildert.
Author: Paul Shore

Abstract

The forty-one years between the Society of Jesus’s papal suppression in 1773 and its eventual restoration in 1814 remain controversial, with new research and interpretations continually appearing. Shore’s narrative approaches these years, and the period preceding the suppression, from a new perspective that covers individuals not usually discussed in works dealing with this topic. As well as examining the contributions of former Jesuits to fields as diverse as ethnology—a term and concept pioneered by an ex-Jesuit—and library science, where Jesuits and ex-Jesuits laid the groundwork for the great advances of the nineteenth century, the essay also explores the period the exiled Society spent in the Russian Empire. It concludes with a discussion of the Society’s restoration in the broader context of world history.

In: Brill Research Perspectives in Jesuit Studies
Mit dem auf vier Bände angelegten Werk wird erstmalig eine Ikonologie der christlichen Kunst im historischen Ablauf geschildert.
Die komplexe Geschichte des Bildes in der Kirche wird ausgehend von der Intention der Darstellungen auf den verschiedenen Bildträgern aufgezeigt und die Weise der damit verbundenen Argumentation fundiert dargelegt. Eingebettet in allgemeine historische Entwicklungen wird der Wandel der Themenkreise beschrieben.
Im zweiten Teil stehen mit Blick auf die Neubegründung staatlicher Macht im Westen sowie die Scholastik zunächst Werke der Buchmalerei, der Kirchendekoration und der Ausstattung im Zentrum. Ein häufiges Phänomen ist hier die Argumentationsweise der Typologie. Mit der Gotik setzt sich ein neuer Naturalismus durch, der gesehene Wirklichkeit im Bild wiedergeben will und auch alte Themen verändert. Der Bildschmuck der Kathedralportale wird ebenso wie die zunehmende Komplexität der Altarretabel beleuchtet. Teils auf östlichen Einflüssen basierend, gewinnt im Spätmittelalter die Tafelmalerei, ebenso wie die neuen Medien der Druckgraphik (Holzschnitt und Kupferstich), in der Privatandacht wie im Wallfahrtswesen an Bedeutung.
‘Ecumenism’ and ‘independency’ suggest two distinct impulses in the history of Christianity: the desire for unity, co-operation, connectivity, and shared belief and practice, and the impulse for distinction, plurality, and contextual translation. Yet ecumenism and independency are better understood as existing in critical tension with one another. They provide a way of examining changes in World Christianity. Taking their lead from the internationally acclaimed research of Brian Stanley, in whose honour this book is published, contributors examine the entangled nature of ecumenism and independency in the modern global history of Christianity. They show how the scrutiny afforded by the attention to local, contextual approaches to Christianity outside the western world, may inform and enrich the attention to transnational connectivity.

Abstract

From space, the Pacific glitters in ocean blue. What might the world’s largest ocean contribute to missio Dei? A spiral methodology is used to trace connections between the baptism of Jesus, early Christian art, recent legal (Treaty of Waitangi Tribunal) research and indigenous knowing, including ocean voyaging, ancestor understandings of whirlpools, Māori water rites and oral history of river beings (taniwha).

The argument is that indigenous Oceanic (Māori) understandings of water, in conversation with baptismal narratives, present missio Dei as an immersion in God. Mission is located not in the activity of the church – and hence mission expansion as part of European colonisation – but in the being and becoming of God. Creation and redemption are interconnected and an environmental ethic is expected. Children of the waters (ngā tamariki o te Moana nui a Kiwa) listen to creation’s voice (taniwha speaking) and act for the life (waiora) of water.

In: Mission Studies

Abstract

While theologies of missio Dei and their divergent missiological developments have been refined and contested in the academy over the past seven decades, the theoretical discussions and even the term itself are still far from commonplace in the life and discourse of many local congregations. Nonetheless, among such congregations there are examples of changing practice and new modes of local mission engagement that seem to be in alignment with aspects of a missio Dei orientation. In this article the experience of one congregation will be considered, asking whether a missio Dei perspective might be discerned in recent initiatives and developments in its engagement with its local community.

In: Mission Studies
In: Mission Studies