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Author: Piotr Szczypa
Discussing the role of violence in the Irish stereotype, this book is a fascinating story of the changing perception of the Irish in America as told by American cinema. From Levi and Cohen, Irish Comedians (1903) to The Irishman (2019), some of the productions analyzed here are timeless classics; others have almost been forgotten. What they have in common is the presence of violence as the key ingredient in the construction of Irish characters. It his insightful study, Piotr Szczypa employs imagological perspective to investigate the evolution of their portrayal in American films, showing not only how the Irish have adjusted to America but also how America has embraced Irishness.
Beckett’s Voices / Voicing Beckett uses ‘voice’ as a prism to investigate Samuel Beckett’s work across a range of texts, genres, and performance cultures. Twenty-one contributors, all members of the Samuel Beckett Working Group of the International Federation for Theatre Research, discuss the musicality of Beckett’s voices, the voice as ‘absent other’, the voices of the vulnerable, the cinematic voice, and enacted voices in performance and media. The volume engages not only with Beckett’s history and legacy, but also with many of the central theoretical issues in theatre studies as a whole. Featuring testimonies from Beckett practitioners as well as emerging and established scholars, it is emblematic of the thriving and diverse community that is twenty-first century Beckett Studies.

Contributors: Svetlana Antropova, Linda Ben-Zvi, Jonathan Bignell, Llewellyn Brown, Julie Campbell, Thirthankar Chakraborty, Laurens De Vos, Everett C. Frost, S. E. Gontarski, Mariko Hori Tanaka, Nicholas E. Johnson, Kumiko Kiuchi, Anna McMullan, Melissa Nolan, Cathal Quinn, Arthur Rose, Teresa Rosell Nicolás, Jürgen Siess, Anna Sigg, Yoshiko Takebe, Michiko Tsushima
Author: Theo D'haen
If you want to know how globalisation affects literary studies today this is the book for you. Why has world literature become so hotly debated? How does it affect the study of national literatures? What does geopolitics have to do with literature? Does American academe still set an example for the rest of the world? Is China taking over? What about European literature? Europe’s literatures? Do “minor” European literatures get lost in the shuffle? How can authors from such literatures get noticed? Who gains and who loses in an age of world literature? If those are questions that bewilder you look no further: this book provides answers and leaves you fully equipped to dig deeper into the fascinating world of world literature in an age of geopolitics.
Volume Editors: Sandra Dinter and Johanna Marquardt
Often thought of as a thing of the past, nationalism remains surprisingly resilient in the postcolonial era, especially since the concepts of multiculturalism and cosmopolitanism have lost authority in recent years. The contributions assembled in Nationalism and the Postcolonial examine various forms, representations, and consequences of past and present nationalisms in languages, popular culture, and literature in or associated with Australia, Canada, England, India, Jamaica, Kenya, Nigeria, Saint Lucia, and Trinidad and Tobago Bringing together perspectives from linguistics, political science, cultural studies, and literary studies, the collection illustrates how postcolonial nationalism functions as a unifying mechanism of anti-colonial nation-building as well as a divisive force that can encourage discrimination and violence.

Contributors: Natascha Bing, Prachi Gupta, Ralf Haekel, Kathrin Härtl, Idreas Khandy, Theresa Krampe, Lukas Lammers, Arhea Marshall, Hannah Pardey, Sina Schuhmaier, Hanna Teichler, Michael Westphal
This book offers a detailed analysis of two major Scottish folk song collections, the Greig-Duncan Collection, and the Scots folk song material of the School of Scottish Studies Archives. This exhaustive study of song transmission includes all contributors, not only notable singers. The scattered information, marshalled into quantifiable data, throws light on such topics as transmission within and outside the family, the role of literacy, the public reticence of women singers, the association between the Travellers and the big ballads, and the impact of social changes in the late nineteenth century, and of broadcast music in the 1920s. The new opportunities opened up by digitisation are explored here for the first time.
Volume Editors: Ruth Frehner and Ursula Zeller
This is the first-time publication of long-lost letters by a crucial figure in modernist publishing. Carefully edited and extensively contextualised, they document Beach’s unwavering, all-embracing support for Joyce’s art by publishing his controversial Ulysses in Paris in 1922 and other efforts such as getting fragments of Work in Progress published. They also reveal her difficulties with his uncompromising and demanding personality, as it is vividly illustrated in the Frankfurter Zeitung affair. The edition moreover includes all extant letters to Paul Léon, her successor after their break-up following severe disagreements over the American edition of Ulysses. Joyceans and scholars of modernism will find this an indispensable resource for further research.
Series Editor: Allan H. Simmons
Series Editor: Allan Simmons
For submissions and a template please visit www.josephconradsociety.org/conradian.

The Neo-Victorian Series aims to analyse the complex revival, re-vision and recycling of the long nineteenth century in the cultural imaginary. This contemporary phenomenon will be examined in its diverse British and worldwide, postcolonial and neo-colonial contexts, as well as its manifold forms, including literature, the arts, film, television, and virtual media. To assess such simultaneous artistic regeneration and retrogressive innovation and to tackle the ethical debate and ideological consequences of these re-appropriations will constitute the main challenges of this series.

Authors are cordially invited to submit proposals and/or full manuscripts to the publisher at BRILL, Masja Horn.
Volume Editors: Clifford Davidson and Sophie Oosterwijk
This edition of John Lydgate’s Dance of Death offers a detailed comparison of the different text versions, a new scholarly edition and translation of Guy Marchant’s 1485 French Danse Macabre text, and an art-historical analysis of its woodcut illustrations.
It addresses the cultural context and historical circumstances of Lydgate’s poem and its model, the mural of 1424-25 with accompanying French poem in Paris, as well as their precursors, notably the Vado mori poems and the Legend of the Three Living and the Three Dead. It discusses authorship, the personification and vizualisation of Death, and the wider dissemination of the Dance. The edited texts include commentaries, notes, and a glossary.
Empowerment as a concept is making its impact on the field of literary studies. This volume shows its intricate relation to contemporary fiction in English, applying a broad range of approaches such as feminist, transcultural, and intersectional studies. Dealing with genres as diverse as dystopia, science fiction, TV adaptations, the historical novel, and immigrant fiction, this collection offers the first in-depth study of empowerment in literature. How, and to which end, do texts endow characters with power? In which ways can fiction become a tool of authorial self-empowerment? And which effects do such narratives have on readers? With this book, empowerment is put on the map of literary studies as a new, highly relevant critical concept stimulating fresh perspectives on contemporary fiction. Contributors: Peter Childs, Britta Maria Colligs, Sarah Dillon, Paul Hamann-Rose, Ralf Hertel, David Malcolm, Diana Thiesen, Eleanor Ty, Eva-Maria Windberger.