This edited volume focuses on gender and love as phenomena that emerge through complex “entanglements and weavings”. At a point where constructionist ideas are losing support, we interrogate theoretical paradigms to assess if constructionist notions still hold value or if new approaches are needed to address the effects of materiality and non-human agency on gender and love. Without claiming any unison or definite answers, we offer situated, agential cuts into Biblical and Rabbinic literature, ecosexual performance art, the writings of Ursula Le Guin and Angela Carter, butch identities, Bengali folktales, Ferzan Özpetek’s cinema, Golem literature, sexual pursuits in Danish nightlife, mother-daughter relationships, women warriors in the PKK, and BDSM performances. Artistic photographer, Sara Davidmann, has contributed to the book with the cover illustration and a creative afterword including seven photographs on the effects of her photography studio on LGBTQ+ people.
Transgression(s) in Twenty-First-Century Women's Writing in French analyses the literary transgressions of women’s writing in French since the turn of the twenty-first century in the works of major figures, such as Annie Ernaux and Véronique Tadjo, of the now established writers of the ‘nouvelle génération’, such as Marie Darrieussecq and Virginie Despentes, and in some of the most exciting and innovative authors from across the francosphère, from Nine Antico to Maïssa Bey and Chloé Delaume.
Pushing the boundaries of current thinking about normative and queer identities, local and global communities, family and kinship structures, bodies and sexualities, creativity and the literary canon, these authors pose the potential of reading and writing to also effectuate change in the world beyond the text.

Transgression(s) in Twenty-First-Century Women's Writing in French étudie les transgressions littéraires dans l’écriture des femmes en français depuis le début du XXIe siècle. L’analyse porte sur les oeuvres de figures majeures, telles qu’Annie Ernaux et Véronique Tadjo, d’auteures bien établies de la ‘nouvelle génération’, parmi lesquelles Marie Darrieussecq et Virginie Despentes, et de certaines des auteures les plus innovantes de la francosphère, de Nine Antico à Maïssa Bey en passant par Chloé Delaume. Repoussant les frontières de la pensée dominante sur les identités normatives ou queer, les communautés locales ou globales, les structures familiales ou de parenté, les corps ou les sexualités, la créativité ou le canon littéraire, ces auteures développent un potentiel de lecture et d’écriture porteur de changements au-delà du texte. Contributors /avec des contributions de: Ounissa Ait Benali, Jean Anderson, Kate Averis, Marzia Caporale, Dawn M. Cornelio, Sandra Daroczi, Sophie Guignard, Élise Hugueny-Léger, Irène Le Roy Ladurie, Siobhán McIlvanney, Michèle A. Schaal, Marta Segarra, Marinella Termite, Lyn Thomas, Antonia Wimbush
Author: Sabine Binder
In this ground-breaking study, Sabine Binder analyses the complex ways in which female crime fictional victims, detectives and perpetrators in South African crime fiction resonate with widespread and persistent real crimes against women in post-apartheid South Africa. Drawing on a wide range of crime novels written over the last decade, Binder emphasises the genre’s feminist potential and critically maps its political work at the intersection of gender and race. Her study challenges the perception of crime fiction as a trivial genre and shows how, in South Africa at least, it provides a vibrant platform for social, cultural and ethical debates, exposing violence, misogyny and racism and shedding light on the problematics of law and justice for women faced with crime.
Author: Elina Pyy
In Women and War in Roman Epic, Elina Pyy discusses the narrative and ideological functions of gender in the works of Virgil, Lucan, Statius, Silius Italicus and Valerius Flaccus. By examining the themes of violence, death, guilt, grief, and anger in their epics, she offers an account of the intertextual tradition of the genre and its socio-political background. Through a combination of classical narratology and Julia Kristeva’s subjectivity theory, Pyy scrutinises how gendered marginality is constructed in the genre and how it contributes to the fashioning of Roman imperial identity. Focusing on the ambiguous elements of epic, the study looks beyond the binary oppositions between the Self and the Other, male and female, and Roman and barbarian.
Author: Yun Zhang
In Engendering the Woman Question, Zhang Yun adopts a new approach to examining the early Chinese women’s periodical press. Rather than seeing this new print and publishing genre as a gendered site coded as either “feminine” or “masculine,” this book approaches it as a mixed-gender public space where both men and women were intellectually active and involved in dynamic interactions to determine the contours of their discursive encounters.

Drawing upon a variety of novel textual modes such as polemical essays, historical biography, public speech, and expository essays, this book opens a window onto men’s and women’s gender-specific approaches to a series of prominent topics central to the Chinese woman question in the early twentieth century.
Nordic Inheritance Law through the Ages – Spaces of Action and Legal Strategies explores the significance of inheritance law from medieval times to the present through topical and in-depth studies that bring life to historical and contemporary inheritance practices. The contributions cover three themes: status of persons and options in the process of property devolution; wills, gift-giving and legal disputes as means to shape the working of the law; processes of inheritance legislation.

The authors focus on instances where legal strategies of various actors particularly reveal inheritance law as a contested and yet constrained space of action, and somewhat surprisingly show similar solutions to family law issues dealt with in other Western European countries.

Contributors are: Simone Abram, Gitte Meldgaard Abrahamsen, Per Andersen, Agnes S. Arnórsdóttir, John Asland, Knut Dørum, Thomas Eeg, Ian Peter Grohse, Marianne Holdgaard, Astrid Mellem Johnsen, Már Jónsson, Mia Korpiola, Gabriela Bjarne Larsson, Auður Magnúsdóttir, Bodil Selmer, Helle I. M. Sigh, and Miriam Tveit.
The Dispute over Israel's Holiest Jewish Site, 1967–2000
The Western Wall—Judaism’s holiest site—occupies a prominent position in contemporary Jewish and Israeli discourse, current events, and local politics. In The Western Wall: The Dispute over Israel's Holiest Jewish Site, 1967–2000, Kobi Cohen-Hattab and Doron Bar offer a detailed exploration of the Western Wall plaza’s evolution in the late twentieth century. The examination covers the role of archaeology in defining the space, the Western Wall’s transformation as an Israeli and Jewish symbol, and the movement to open it to a variety of Jewish denominations. The book studies the central processes and shifts that took place at the Western Wall during the three decades that followed the Six-Day War—a relatively short yet crucial chapter in Jerusalem's extensive history.
Travellers and Trendsetters, 1870-1970
Destination for artists and convalescents, playground of the rich, site of foreign allure, the French Riviera has long attracted visitors to its shores. Ranging through the late nineteenth century, the Belle Epoque, the ‘roaring twenties’, and the emancipatory post-war years, Rosemary Lancaster highlights the contributions of nine remarkable women to the cultural identity of the Riviera in its seminal rise to fame. Embracing an array of genres, she gives new focus to feminine writings never previously brought together, nor as richly critically explored. Fiction, memoir, diary, letters, even cookbooks and choreographies provide compelling evidence of the innovativeness of women who seized the challenges and opportunities of their travels in a century of radical social and artistic change.
In: The Western Wall
In: The Western Wall