Figuren der Einverleibung zwischen Eucharistie und Anthropophagie
This transdisciplinary project represents the most comprehensive study of imagination to date. The eclectic group of international scholars who comprise this volume propose bold and innovative theoretical frameworks for (re-) conceptualizing imagination in all of its divergent forms. Imagination and Art: Explorations in Contemporary Theory explores the complex nuances, paradoxes, and aporias related to the plethora of artistic mediums in which the human imagination manifests itself. As a fundamental attribute of our species, which other organisms also seem to possess with varying degrees of sophistication, imagination is the very fabric of what it means to be human into which everything is woven. This edited collection demonstrates that imagination is the resin that binds human civilization together for better or worse.
In this collection of essays, Maurizio Ferraris explores the world portrayed in Marcel Proust's In Search of Lost Time. He ponders how memory is tied to self-identification and knowledge; how the passage of time is only perceptible after it has passed; and how life, ultimately, is accurately portrayed in literature in ways that were seen as inconceivable in our youth. Running throughout the book is the sense that memory is all we are; we are what we remember or what others remember of us.
Dinge, Räume, Narrative
Ob als Motiv, Handlungsschauplatz oder Gegenstand der Kritik – in der Literatur wird das Museum zur Reflexionsfigur der Repräsentierbarkeit und Konservierbarkeit von Welt und Wissen. Museales Erzählen stellt die Frage nach dem Verhältnis von Zeichen und Dingen, Erinnerung und materieller Kultur.
Die Beiträge widmen sich musealen Dingen, Räumen und Narrativen in literarischen Texten sowie Sammlungskontexten vom 18. Jahrhundert bis in die Gegenwart. Unter Verschränkung museologischer, kulturhistorischer und literaturwissenschaftlicher Perspektiven geht es zum einen um institutionsgeschichtliche Aspekte verschiedener Museumstypen. Zum anderen wird nach museumsspezifischen Formen des Erzählens gefragt: Wie werden die Dinge zum Sprechen gebracht? Wie werden räumliche Ordnungen textuell konstituiert und beschrieben? Welche Rolle spielen narrative Praktiken des Sammelns, Inventarisierens, Kuratierens und Ausstellens?
Author: Nasrin Qader

Abstract

Asef Soltanzadah is one of the most thought-provoking Afghan writers. His work, set exclusively during wartime, may be characterized by both seriousness and playfulness. To borrow Warren Motte’s words, “playing in earnest” is his literary signature. Yet, he occupies a marginal place within the institution of world literature not only because he writes in Persian but also because he is minimally translated and read. In this article, I turn to two of his short stories featuring a game of cards and kite flying, setting them into conversation with theories of play. I argue that by creating a space for play, Soltanzadah brings into visibility and reflects on the process, promise and risk of transforming mere life into life world within the time and space of war, challenging the theoretical framing of play in relation to the real world while questioning the possibility of worlding in the time of war.

In: Journal of World Literature
Alongside annals, chronicles were the main genre of historical writing in the Middle Ages. Their significance as sources for the study of medieval history and culture is today widely recognised not only by historians, but also by students of medieval literature and linguistics and by art historians. The series The Medieval Chronicle aims to provide a representative survey of the on-going research in the field of chronicle studies, illustrated by examples from specific chronicles from a wide variety of countries, periods and cultural backgrounds.
There are several reasons why the chronicle is particularly suited as the topic of a yearbook. In the first place there is its ubiquity: all over Europe and throughout the Middle Ages chronicles were written, both in Latin and in the vernacular, and not only in Europe but also in the countries neighbouring on it, like those of the Arabic world. Secondly, all chronicles raise such questions as by whom, for whom, or for what purpose were they written, how do they reconstruct the past, what determined the choice of verse or prose, or what kind of literary influences are discernable in them. Finally, many chronicles have been beautifully illuminated, and the relation between text and image leads to a wholly different set of questions.
The Medieval Chronicle is published in cooperation with the Medieval Chronicle Society (medievalchronicle.org).

Abstract

This paper argues that the Gesta Francorum could have been written in Latin as a text designed for performance. It starts by looking at the style and approach of the text itself, arguing that whilst the Gesta’s Latin is close to the vernacular it has strong performative elements. It argues that Latin texts could be made comprehensible to a non-Latin literate public in a range of contexts. It explores the linguistic climate in Southern Italy and Sicily at this time and argues that Latin would not only have been comprehensible to the audience but a possible lingua franca for wider use, meaning that the text could have served as a pivot text for other languages. The paper concludes that looking at the text as designed for oral delivery offers insight into why it seems to have existed in several versions, why it was seen as so unusual by contemporaries and why it was so influential.

In: The Medieval Chronicle 13
Author: Cristian Bratu

Résumé

Medievalists have proposed several possible explanations for the abrupt ending of Wace’s Roman de Rou, which I discuss in the first part of this article. I argue that the most relevant among these hypotheses are the ones that consider the political and religious context in which Wace composed the Rou. Although the hypothesis of the Roman de Rou’s pro-ecclesiastical bent is particularly relevant for our discussion, I argue that a reassessment of the textual evidence adduced in support of this theory is imperative. In the second part of the essay, I briefly discuss the political and religious context in which the Rou was written, with particular emphasis on the ‘Becket affair’. In the last section, I analyse Wace’s statements that appear to confirm his pro-ecclesiastical stance.

In: The Medieval Chronicle 13

Abstract

This paper is based on a methodological approach to the question of authorship of chronicles, as applied to the study of the Venetian chronicles.

There are over two thousand Venetian manuscripts that included chronicles, and they were written over a long period between the eleventh and the eighteenth centuries. Such manuscripts may be found not only in Italy, but also in many other parts of the world. The authors of some have been identified on the basis of solid arguments. For others, however, the arguments are far from convincing.

My paper is an attempt to analyze all those instances of chronicles the authorship of which has been wrongly established, and to explain how that happened.

I will argue that in such cases the attribution to a particular author is wrong. In my view the default assumption should be the anonymity of chronicles. One can accept a named author only when there are no doubts about it.

In: The Medieval Chronicle 13