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Author: Di Luo
Beyond Citizenship focuses on the role of literacy in building a modern nation-state by examining the government provision of adult literacy training in early twentieth-century China. Based on untapped archives and diaries, Di Luo uncovers people’s strategic use of literacy and illiteracy in social interactions and explores the impact of daily experiences on the expansion of state power. Highlighting interpersonal and intergroup relations, Beyond Citizenship suggests a new methodology of studying literacy which foregrounds the agentive role of historical actors and so moves away from a more traditional approach that treats literacy itself as the key factor enabling social change.
Over the years, translation has increasingly become a necessary tool to function in contemporary society. Based on years of research and teaching activity within the field, this book offers a useful and effective paradigm for the translation of different types of texts, guiding readers towards the realisation of effective translation projects. The several contrastive analyses presented and the suggestions offered throughout will help readers appreciate the implications and consequences of every translation choice, encouraging them to develop reading and translating skills applicable to the variety of texts they face in everyday life, from novels to comic books, films, and television series.
In: A New Paradigm for Translators of Literary and Non-Literary Texts

Abstract

This chapter approaches a variety of textual typologies (literary and audiovisual texts as well as graphic products), which are analysed (often contrastively) and exemplified from the perspective of interlingual translation, by adopting the model presented in the Introduction as a guide. In order to provide specific examples of how interlingual strategies might be adopted, this chapter occasionally examines instances of translation into Italian. Thanks to the discussion developed and the back-translations provided, however, these sections are fully comprehensible to all readers and offer useful examples of strategies that could be adopted in the case of interlingual translations also in other target languages. Throughout the chapter, issues connected to cultural and postcolonial translation, the translation of poetry, songs, humour, etc. are explored and scrutinised.

In: A New Paradigm for Translators of Literary and Non-Literary Texts

Abstract

In this chapter, the model is adopted to address intersemiotic issues and discuss various examples of intersemiotic translation. Thus, the transposition of novels into films and television series is initially investigated. The chapter also analyses some examples of remakes and re-translations in graphic forms, as well as the translation of graphic products into audiovisual texts. As the chapter makes clear, the model therefore becomes a valuable tool not only in the realisation of effective translations but also in their quality assessment.

In: A New Paradigm for Translators of Literary and Non-Literary Texts

Abstract

This chapter is dedicated to intralingual translations and different types of rewritings, from didactic materials to more ‘ideological’ translations where the impact exerted by language and translation on the construction of identity is taken into consideration. In the first part of the chapter, the notion of translation is closely connected to that of accessibility, interpreted here in its broader meaning. The first part of the chapter therefore analyses how some of the classics of British literature have been rewritten for specific categories of readers (children, learners of English as a foreign language, students, etc.). The remainder of the chapter takes more explicitly into account how the notion of intertextuality impacts on intralingual translation, analysing for example how poems have been rewritten as novels and how critical theory has been narrativised in literary texts.

In: A New Paradigm for Translators of Literary and Non-Literary Texts

Abstract

This chapter posits the theoretical framework on which the entire volume rests and introduces the translation model originally elaborated and presented in a previous article (Canepari, 2017). Through the Introduction, the different translation phases according to which the model is organised are therefore presented and discussed. As emphasised in the Introduction, because of its paedagogical intent, the model can become a very useful instrument in a learning environment, helping translation students familiarise with the various operations entailed in any project, and making them proceed according to a grid that forces them to pay attention to the various aspects of the text and their implications, in terms of interpretation and translation solutions, adapting the model and the various theories it exploits to different projects. Yet, as clarified in the volume, through its systematic approach, the model aims at forming attentive readers and translators, capable of decoding (and re-coding) texts with which receivers have often to contend in everyday life.

In: A New Paradigm for Translators of Literary and Non-Literary Texts
Author: Roger Hopkins
We live at a time when the competitive, capitalist model of action has eclipsed all other contemporary social and economic models and threatens the greater cooperative good of society. Neoliberalism is an attempt to reimagine governance in an age of mass democratic policies by its intention to inoculate capitalism against the threat of democracy.

Education for Action: A Curriculum for Social Activists sees social action as a vital vehicle in challenging this intense individualistic, managerial and competitive ethos. Such action is a collective, transformative response to capitalism which combines local activism, community development and the advocacy of social, political and economic rights to help committed citizens initiate, stimulate and support social change at both local and global levels.

The book explains the methods, instruments, theories and practices that help educators encourage activists to build power amongst concerned individuals using a curriculum that emphasises the importance of critical theory and which is accessible to everybody and rooted in their community. The author also stresses the vital role of education in helping activists resist the ideologies, actions and slogans imposed on society by authoritarian powerholders while simultaneously regenerating grass-roots politics and its belief in the viability of collective solidarity and social activism.
Author: Roger Hopkins

Abstract

Different types of power including Castells’ Grounded Theory are described. Examples of social activists successfully challenging powerholders are presented with great focus placed on the ideas and community work practice of Saul Alinsky. The potency of power and politics, and the need for activists to rediscover their organising roots that were often nourished in labour-focused political activity is explored, while the need to make social actions relevant to the demands of a new age is emphasised. An assessment of the current state of social action as a positive force, including its impact during a time of Covid, is made. Finally, the chapter looks at the contribution of student activists to the need for new strategies of social action with an appraisal of their future potential.

In: Educating for Action
Author: Roger Hopkins

Abstract

The strengths and weaknesses of common-sense thinking, with a consideration of alternative thinking strategies – and their relevance to stimulating reflective social action – are the main focus of this chapter. Clifford Geertz’s definition of common sense is explained. The durability of common sense thinking in the student population is considered and explored with an historical perspective on the hostility of English political thinkers to the concept of “theory”. Five examples of contemporary common-sense thinking are analysed while the Italian theorist Antonio Gramsci’s concept of the organic intellectual is outlined as is its on-going relevance to social activists. Finally, the chapter considers the current neoliberal “common sense” vocabulary and how it can be opposed for collective action purposes.

In: Educating for Action