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Volume Editors: Elizabeth Cavicchi and Peter Heering
These essays draw on recent and versatile work by museum staff, science educators, and teachers, showing what can be done with historical scientific instruments or replicas. Varied audiences - with members just like you - can be made aware of exciting aspects of history, observation, problem-solving, restoration, and scientific understanding, by the projects outlined here by professional practitioners. These interdisciplinary case studies, ranging from the cinematic to the hands-on, show how inspiration concerning science and the past can give intellectual pleasure as well as authentic learning to new participants, who might include people like you: students, teachers, curators, and the interested and engaged public.

Contributors are Dominique Bernard, Paolo Brenni, Roland Carchon, Elizabeth Cavicchi, Stéphane Fischer, Peter Heering, J.W. Huisman, Françoise Khantine-Langlois, Alistair M. Kwan, Janet Laidla, Pierre Lauginie, Panagiotis Lazos, Pietro Milici, Flora Paparou, Frédérique Plantevin, Julie Priser, Alfonso San-Miguel, Danny Segers, Constantine (Kostas) Skordoulis, Trienke M. van der Spek, Constantina Stefanidou, and Giorgio Strano.    
K-8 Lesson Plans for Ecological and Social Change
Eco-Mathematics Education strives to show how everyone can experience the embedded connection between mathematics and the natural world. The authors’ sincere hope is that by doing so, we can radically change the way we come to understand mathematics, as well as humanity’s place in the ecosystem. The book hopes to accomplish this by providing in-depth lesson plans and resources for educators and anyone interested in teaching and learning mathematics through an ecological aesthetic perspective. All lessons are based on the inquiry method of teaching, aligned to standards, incorporate art projects inspired by famous artists, and utilize recycled and/or natural materials as much as possible.
Volume Editors: Annica Andersson and Richard Barwell
There is no shortage of urgent, complex problems that mathematics education can and should engage with. Pandemics, forest fires, pollution, Black Lives Matter protests, and fake news all involve mathematics, are matters of life and death, have a clear political dimension, and are interdisciplinary in nature. They demand a critical approach. The authors in this volume showcase new insights, teaching ideas and new and unique ways of applying critical mathematics education, in areas as diverse as climate change, obesity, decolonisation and ethnomathematics. This book demonstrates that there is plenty to be done with critical mathematics education.

Contributors are: Annica Andersson, Tonya Gau Bartell, Richard Barwell, Lisa Lunney Borden, Sunghwan Byun, Anna Chronaki, Brian Greer, Jennifer Hall, Victoria Hand, Kjellrun Hiis Hauge, Beth Herbel-Eisenmann, Rune Herheim, Courtney Koestler, Kate le Roux, Swapna Mukhopadhyay, Aldo Parra, Anita Rampal, Sheena Rughubar-Reddy, Toril Eskeland Rangnes, Ulrika Ryan, Lisa Steffensen, Paola Valero and David Wagner.
Chapter 1 Applying Critical Mathematics Education

Abstract

In this introductory chapter, we first set out our broad characterisation of critical mathematics education, drawing on contemporary issues including, for example, global climate change and rapid societal challenges. Critical mathematics education is driven by urgent, complex questions; is interdisciplinary; is politically active and engaged; is democratic; involves critique; and is reflexive and self-aware. This perspective leads us to argue for the necessity of critical mathematics education, for which we summarise three significant traditions derived from Freire, Foucault, and the Nordic School. Finally, we provide an overview and discussion of the contributions to this volume, and show how they apply critical mathematics education in unique ways that relate to the six previously described features of this approach. We conclude by reiterating the urgent necessity of applying critical mathematics education.

Open Access
In: Applying Critical Mathematics Education
Chapter 8 A Critical Mathematics Education for Climate Change

Abstract

Climate change is an urgent global challenge. Responding to climate change requires significant critical mathematical understanding on the part of all citizens. In this chapter, we consider what a critical mathematics education for climate change might look like. We draw on ideas from Skovsmose’s work, including the notion of formatting, as well as the body of work known as post-normal science. As a starting point for pedagogical reflection, we propose twelve principles, operating within landscapes of investigation, and organised into three groups relating to: forms of authenticity; forms of participation; and reflection on and with mathematics. We illustrate these ideas with an example of a possible landscape of investigation relating to historical temperature change.

Open Access
In: Applying Critical Mathematics Education
Chapter 12 Critical Mathematics Education Imaginaries
Author: Anita Rampal

Abstract

Reflections on how critical mathematics education can offer a diverse and expanding arena to address several themes, without necessarily needing to synthesise it or blur its contours with respect to ethnomathematics. Using the perspective of “righting our world,” inspired by Freire’s sense of “writing the world,” the focus is on transforming and decolonising mathematical knowledge.

In: Applying Critical Mathematics Education
Chapter 2 Culturally Situated Critical Mathematics Education

Abstract

Based on a synthesis of connections between ethnomathematics and critical mathematics education, we present a set of four “concerns,” framing what we call culturally situated critical mathematics education. We see any ethnomathematics or critical mathematics education work as fitting within this framing. We illustrate the framework with an analysis of two empirical articles, one reporting an ethnomathematical teaching and research project in a Sámi context, and one reporting on a critical mathematics education teaching and research project in an underprivileged context in the USA. Our analysis shows how the concerns bring the strengths of ethnomathematics to critical mathematics education and vice versa.

Open Access
In: Applying Critical Mathematics Education
Chapter 3 Decolonising Mathematics Education in a Time of Reconciliation

Abstract

Canada’s Truth and Reconciliation Commission (TRC) lays out the role education has played in creating inequity, perpetuating stereotypes and silencing Indigenous voices, and makes the clear claim that education is also the vehicle for addressing these wrongs and finding a new way forward. In light of the TRC’S calls to action, in this chapter I consider what it means to decolonise mathematics education. To that end, I review literature relating to decolonising education, critical mathematics education, and ethnomathematics to explore what it might mean to decolonise mathematics education. Drawing upon examples from empirical research, I then consider what decolonisation could look like in mathematics teaching and learning focusing on beginning with different stories, centring community knowledge, and moving beyond material culture to ensuring Indigenous ways of knowing being and doing are central to the practice of teaching and learning. I conclude that when students can learn mathematics in ways that align with their community worldview, then they are likely to have more success while acknowledging that the process of decolonising is one that is ongoing and ever evolving.

In: Applying Critical Mathematics Education
Epilogues
In: Applying Critical Mathematics Education
Chapter 11 From the Present Towards Hope for the Future

Abstract

In this epilogue we elaborate on and synthesise what we have learnt from reading this book. We start by considering what the word “apply” in Applying Critical Mathematics Education might mean. Apply connotes to put into action, but it is also related to the following ideas: to work hard at, to pay close attention to, to have relevance for and to request something. In the context of our readings we think of being relational and dedicated as a matter of enhancing situated critical awareness, addressing relevant issues as a matter of highlighting complex global and local challenges and making demands as a matter of agency and power. To us, these themes together synthesise the insights on critical mathematics education in action that the authors of this book offer; namely, propositions on how to illuminate and execute social justice and heterogenous subjectification by critically entangling local and global knowledges in contextually situated educational enactments that hold the potential to address complex challenges. We close by sharing our ideas on how the contribution of this book gives us hope for the future in these times of crises and complex challenges.

Open Access
In: Applying Critical Mathematics Education