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Volume Editors: Elizabeth Cavicchi and Peter Heering
These essays draw on recent and versatile work by museum staff, science educators, and teachers, showing what can be done with historical scientific instruments or replicas. Varied audiences - with members just like you - can be made aware of exciting aspects of history, observation, problem-solving, restoration, and scientific understanding, by the projects outlined here by professional practitioners. These interdisciplinary case studies, ranging from the cinematic to the hands-on, show how inspiration concerning science and the past can give intellectual pleasure as well as authentic learning to new participants, who might include people like you: students, teachers, curators, and the interested and engaged public.

Contributors are Dominique Bernard, Paolo Brenni, Roland Carchon, Elizabeth Cavicchi, Stéphane Fischer, Peter Heering, J.W. Huisman, Françoise Khantine-Langlois, Alistair M. Kwan, Janet Laidla, Pierre Lauginie, Panagiotis Lazos, Pietro Milici, Flora Paparou, Frédérique Plantevin, Julie Priser, Alfonso San-Miguel, Danny Segers, Constantine (Kostas) Skordoulis, Trienke M. van der Spek, Constantina Stefanidou, and Giorgio Strano.    
Volume Editors: Radhika Iyengar and Christina T. Kwauk
The global education community, guided for decades by the concept of Education for Sustainable Development, has done little to support the radical transformation of education systems needed to respond to climate change. Part of this inertia rests in five roadblocks to quality education identified in a Brookings report, and about which stakeholders from the fields of ESD, GCED, GE, and HR education came together in April 2020 to begin discussing ways of addressing.

This edited volume picks up that conversation by laying out elements of a shared vision, or roadmap, for the global education sector in climate action. The volume includes perspectives that span multiple continents, disciplines, and positionalities within the education system – from policymakers to teachers to youth. It curates exiting literature, surfaces in-depth case studies, and presents overviews of conceptual frameworks on a diverse range of topics relating to systems transformation, monitoring and accountability mechanisms, lessons from the field, teacher support, as well as activism and advocacy by students.

Curriculum and Learning for Climate Action: Toward an SDG 4.7 Roadmap for Systems Change offers researchers, practitioners, donors, and decisionmakers insights into entry points for education systems change needed to reorient our relationship with our planetary systems.
In: Asia-Pacific Science Education

Abstract

This study aimed to examine the trends in grants for STEM/STEAM education in Japan as well as Japanese students’ perception of science learning and future careers. The grants were addressed through analysis of chronological trends, while student perceptions were reviewed through student questionnaires on Trends in International Mathematics and Science Study (TIMSS) 2011, 2015, and 2019. The results reflect ideas on not only STEM education, which is often treated in the context of workforce development and science/mathematics education in Japan, but also ideas on the rapid expansion of and changes to STEAM education around 2015, which seems to be intended the integration of multiple subjects. In contrast, the results showed that students’ perceptions of science and engineering careers are improving, but there are still challenges. Since subject-integrated learning has already been conducted in Japan, we consider the further discussion required regarding specific objective of STEAM versus STEM education.

Open Access
In: Asia-Pacific Science Education

Abstract

This study aims to investigate climate literacy among junior high school students participating in an SSI-STEAM climate change education program and to examine the impacts of the program on the cultivation of climate literacy. Thirty-one eighth-grade students in Seoul, Korea, participated in this study. Data were collected using pre- and post-program surveys with a climate literacy questionnaire (CLQ), students’ background survey questions, interviews with participants, and from the artifacts produced by students during the program. Participants’ climate literacy was shown to improve substantially after attending the program, especially in the domains of perception and action. The four characteristics of climate literacy change were identified in the participants’ responses: more concrete ideas, extension of the scope of thinking, positive responsibility, and relevance recognition. The climate literacy program developed showed potential for fostering young people’s climate literacy along with their understanding of responsible national and global citizenship. The study discusses the implications of these findings and includes suggestions for future climate literacy program development and for both curricular and extra-curricular climate change education that can together nurture students’ more profound understanding of climate change.

Open Access
In: Asia-Pacific Science Education

Abstract

Teachers do not simply deliver a set curriculum, but carry out classes based on practical knowledge, including their values, beliefs, and experiences. Therefore, it is meaningful to investigate the practical knowledge of teaching among teachers in terms of orientation, structure, and content in order to understand the teacher’s knowledge, conflicts, and trial and error experiences in the classroom. In this study, we explored the practical knowledge of a teacher conducting SSI-STEAM classes themed on climate change. In the specific context of SSI-STEAM classes, it was possible to understand how the teacher organized climate change classes and guided the actions of students in action-oriented classes. In addition, we expect that this study, which examines the practical knowledge of a novice teacher, will serve as the first step in narrowing the gap in SSI-STEAM education between pre-service teacher education and actual school classroom experience.

Open Access
In: Asia-Pacific Science Education
Author: Yumi Lee

Abstract

In an effort to reform education, Uzbekistan has adopted STEAM education as a basic principle of educational reform. However, as these efforts are largely being made from a top-down manner, knowledge about STEAM education in schools and informal settings is not yet well known. This paper introduces Uzbekistan’s general education status and shares findings from surveys and interviews with in- and pre-service teachers, and professors about STEAM education. In addition, newspaper articles and government documents about STEAM education were analyzed to understanding how education reforms are being established. STEAM education is explored as a potential tool for helping to improve science teaching and learning in the Uzbekistan education system. Using survey responses and interviews, this paper shares how teachers think of STEAM education and makes suggestions for how the government can more effectively achieve reform goals related to STEAM education.

Open Access
In: Asia-Pacific Science Education
Author: Yumi Lee

Abstract

In an effort to reform education, Uzbekistan has adopted STEAM education as a basic principle of educational reform. However, as these efforts are largely being made from a top-down manner, knowledge about STEAM education in schools and informal settings is not yet well known. This paper introduces Uzbekistan’s general education status and shares findings from surveys and interviews with in- and pre-service teachers, and professors about STEAM education. In addition, newspaper articles and government documents about STEAM education were analyzed to understanding how education reforms are being established. STEAM education is explored as a potential tool for helping to improve science teaching and learning in the Uzbekistan education system. Using survey responses and interviews, this paper shares how teachers think of STEAM education and makes suggestions for how the government can more effectively achieve reform goals related to STEAM education.

Open Access
In: Asia-Pacific Science Education

Abstract

In this case study, we present opportunities science, technology, engineering, arts, and mathematics (STEAM) education provided to a sixth-grade class. We collected observational and interview data in a language arts and a science class over 1 year. We used the liberation social psychology (LSP) framework to understand students’ discourses and discussions as they drew from science, engineering activities, and language arts ideas. Further, LSP allowed us to explore students’ engagement in critical reflection of social, racial, and other discrimination. The data analysis showed that STEAM education promoted the integration of science ideas, engineering design, social and critical consciousness. We found STEAM education supported discourses of critical reflection, racism, and social discrimination in class. Finally, we argue that STEAM education in Asia-Pacific and Global South countries has to be about critical consciousness, social change, and liberation of underrepresented groups and immigrants for more inclusive, sociopolitically conscious, and democratic STEAM education experiences.

Open Access
In: Asia-Pacific Science Education

Abstract

In this case study, we present opportunities science, technology, engineering, arts, and mathematics (STEAM) education provided to a sixth-grade class. We collected observational and interview data in a language arts and a science class over 1 year. We used the liberation social psychology (LSP) framework to understand students’ discourses and discussions as they drew from science, engineering activities, and language arts ideas. Further, LSP allowed us to explore students’ engagement in critical reflection of social, racial, and other discrimination. The data analysis showed that STEAM education promoted the integration of science ideas, engineering design, social and critical consciousness. We found STEAM education supported discourses of critical reflection, racism, and social discrimination in class. Finally, we argue that STEAM education in Asia-Pacific and Global South countries has to be about critical consciousness, social change, and liberation of underrepresented groups and immigrants for more inclusive, sociopolitically conscious, and democratic STEAM education experiences.

Open Access
In: Asia-Pacific Science Education