Browse results

A critical scholarly edition of the Karaite Yefet ben ʿEli ha-Levi's (10th-century) Judaeo-Arabic translation of and commentary on the prophetic books Amos, Haggai, and Malachi, including a comparison of 19 manuscripts and an extensive introduction. The introduction discusses Yefet's exegesis of the three books, his approaches to the biblical narratives, his polemic with the Rabbanites, and the exegetical principles he uses in his translation of the verses. Yefet ben ʿEli was one of the most important biblical commentators of the early Middle Ages. He translated all the books of the Bible into Judaeo-Arabic and composed a long commentary on them. His commentaries on the books of Amos, Haggai, and Malachi reflect his method of biblical exegesis and present unique interpretive ideas.
Volume Editors: Marzena Zawanowska and Mateusz Wilk
King David if one of the most central figures in all of the major monotheistic traditions. He generally connotes the heroic past of the (more imagined than real) ancient Israelite empire and is associated with messianic hopes for the future. Nevertheless, his richly ambivalent and fascinating literary portrayal in the Hebrew Bible is one of the most complex of all biblical characters.
This volume aims at taking a new, critical look at the process of biblical creation and subsequent exegetical transformation of the character of David and his attributed literary composition (the Psalms), with particular emphasis put on the multilateral fertilization and cross-cultural interchanges among Jews, Christians and Muslims.
Volume Editors: Antonios Kalatzis and Enrico Lucca
The articles collected in "Into Life." Franz Rosenzweig on Knowledge, Aesthetics, and Politics focus on the significance of Franz Rosenzweig's work far beyond the realms of theology and philosophy of religion. They engage with a wide range of issues in philosophy and offer new insights, both by presenting an array of unpublished and underestimated sources and by bringing Rosenzweig's thought into dialogue with new approaches and interlocutors, such as Stanley Cavell, William Alston, Carl Schmitt, and Martin Heidegger. The result is a refreshing and original perspective on the work of one of the most significant thinkers of the twentieth century.
A Jewish weapons manufacturer during the American Civil War, a Jewish-Canadian chair of the Metropolitan Toronto Police Board, and Jewish-Argentine guerrilla fighters—these are some of the individuals discussed in this first-of-its-kind volume. It brings together some of the best new works on armed Jews in the Americas. Links between Jews and their ties to weapons are addressed through multiple cultural, political, social, and ideological contexts, thus breaking down longstanding, stilted myths in many societies about Jews and weaponry. Anti-Semitism and Jewish self-defense, Jewish volunteers in the Spanish Civil War and in the 1948 Arab-Israeli war, and Jewish-American gangsters as ethnic heroes form part of the little-researched topic of Jews and arms in the Americas.
Critical Editions of the Translation by Moses Ibn Tibbon and the Translation Ascribed to Rabbi Jacob, with an Introduction and Glossary. Volume One: Books I–II
Author: Ofer Elior
Euclid's Elements is one of the canonical texts that shaped our cultural heritage. It was translated from Greek into Arabic and from Arabic into Hebrew and Latin. There is little agreement about the textual history of the Arabic translations. The present book offers for the first time a critical edition of two Hebrew translations of Books I–II, by Moses Ibn Tibbon and by "Rabbi Jacob". A serious attempt is made to learn from the Hebrew translations also about the history of the Arabic text. The edition of Ibn Tibbon's translation is accompanied by an Arabic text which was probably its source. Rabbi Jacob's translation is compared to the Latin translation ascribed to Adelard of Bath, probably based on the same Arabic tradition.