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Editor: Olga Voronina
A Companion to Soviet Children’s Literature and Film offers a comprehensive and innovative analysis of Soviet literary and cinematic production for children. Its contributors contextualize and reevaluate Soviet children’s books, films, and animation and explore their contemporary re-appropriation by the Russian government, cultural practitioners, and educators.
Celebrating the centennial of Soviet children’s literature and film, the Companion reviews the rich and dramatic history of the canon. It also provides an insight into the close ties between Soviet children’s culture and Avant-Garde aesthetics, investigates early pedagogical experiments of the Soviet state, documents the importance of translation in children’s literature of the 1920-80s, and traces the evolution of heroic, fantastic, historical, and absurdist Soviet narratives for children.
Approaches to a Major Russian Poet
Marina Cvetaeva is one of the best-known Russian poets of the 20th century, often translated and studied in a copious scholarly literature. With articles on Cvetaeva’s biography and her relationship with visual arts, drama, folklore, music, translation and the work of other poets, this volume offers both a valuable overview of scholarly approaches to her work today and a way to enter specific aspects of her writing and career. Contributors include both foremost established scholars of Cvetaeva’s work and young scholars taking new approaches and discovering neglected artifacts and topics. Scholars who do not read Russian will find this collection of value, as will advanced students of Russian literature, poetry, and women’s writing.

Contributors include Molly Thomasy Blasing, Karen Evans-Romaine, Sibelan Forrester, Karin Grelz, Olga Peters Hasty, Maria Khotimsky, Olga Partan, and Alexandra Smith
Marianne Werefkin and the Women Artists in Her Circle traces the relationships between the modernist artists in Werefkin’s circle, including Erma Bossi, Elisabeth Epstein, Natalia Goncharova, Elizaveta Kruglikova, Else Lasker-Schüler, Marta Liepiņa-Skulme, Elena Luksch-Makowsky, and Maria Marc. The book demonstrates that their interactions were dominated not primarily by national ties, but rather by their artistic ideas, intellectual convictions, and gender roles; it offers an analysis of the various artistic scenes, the places of exchange, and the artists’ sources of inspiration. Specifically focusing on issues of cosmopolitan culture, transcultural dialogue, gender roles, and the building of new artistic networks, the collection of essays re-evaluates the contributions of these artists to the development of modern art.

Contributors: Shulamith Behr, Marina Dmitrieva, Simone Ewald, Bernd Fäthke, Olga Furman, Petra Lanfermann, Tanja Malycheva, Galina Mardilovich, Antonia Napp, Carla Pellegrini Rocca, Dorothy Price, Hildegard Reinhardt, Kornelia Röder, Kimberly A. Smith, Laima Laučkaitė-Surgailienė, Baiba Vanaga, and Isabel Wünsche
Art Periodical Culture in Late Imperial Russia (1898-1917). Print Modernism in Transition offers a detailed exploration of the major Modernist art periodicals in late imperial Russia, the World of Art ( Mir Iskusstva, 1899-1904), The Golden Fleece ( Zolotoe runo, 1906-1909) and Apollo ( Apollon, 1909-1917). By exploring the role of art reproduction in the nineteenth century and the emergence of these innovative art journals in the turn of the century, Hanna Chuchvaha proves that these Modernist periodicals advanced the Russian graphic arts and reinforced the development of reproduction technologies and the art of printing. Offering a detailed examination of the “inaugural” issues, which included editorial positions expressed in words and images, Hanna Chuchvaha analyses the periodicals’ ideologies and explores journals as art objects appearing in their unique socio-historical context in imperial Russia.
The Byzantine as Method in Modernity
Byzantium/Modernism features contributions by fourteen international scholars and brings together a diverse range of interdisciplinary essays on art, architecture, theatre, film, literature, and philosophy, which examine how and why Byzantine art and image theory can contribute to our understanding of modern and contemporary visual culture. Particular attention is given to intercultural dialogues between the former dominions of the Byzantine Empire, with a special focus on Greece, Turkey, and Russia, and the artistic production of Western Europe and America. Together, these essays invite the reader to think critically and theoretically about the dialogic interchange between Byzantium and modernism and to consider this cross-temporal encounter as an ongoing and historically deep narrative, rather than an ephemeral or localized trend.
Contributors are Tulay Atak, Charles Barber, Elena Boeck, Anthony Cutler, Rico Franses, Dimitra Kotoula, Marie-José Mondzain, Myroslava M. Mudrak, Robert S. Nelson, Robert Ousterhout, Stratis Papaioannou, Glenn Peers, Jane A. Sharp and Devin Singh.