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Author: Katrin Buchmann
Buchmann analyses the work of UK, German, Danish and Swedish embassies in the USA and China on climate change in the late 2000s and early 2010s. She relates which coalitions and narratives embassies sought to develop to convince China and the United States that a more progressive climate policy was possible, to achieve gains supporting an agreement under the UNFCCC. This book shows that a key interpretation of climate diplomacy was selling/trade: Europe selling technology “solutions” to solve climate change. In this narrative, Europe has already done what needs to be done and outsourcing of production to China e.g. is ignored. In the USA, embassies entered coalitions with states, faith groups and the military, arguing that a more progressive climate policy was mandated by either God or security concerns. State politicians, including Democrats, often actually didn’t implement any climate policies. Any gains were reversed through climate denial lobbying funded by corporations. Embassies did not address this.
Editor: Irmgard Marboe
Author: Reza Eftekhar
The Baltic Yearbook of International Law – the first legal journal in the field and sub fields of international law – is published under the auspices of the Baltic Editorial Board within the framework of cooperation between the Riga Graduate School of Law and Brill/Nijhoff Publishers. The Yearbook aims to bring to the international debate issues that are of importance in the Baltic States, providing a forum for views on topical international law themes from Baltic and international scholars. The first volume appeared in 2001 with a symposium on the question of the international legal status of the Baltic States.

The Yearbook contains state practice reports from Estonia, Latvia and Lithuania, thus serving as an important source of international law that is unavailable elsewhere. From time to time the Yearbook offers articles discussing the history of international law and current issues in Eastern Europe and the Russian Federation, thus making regional discourse more accessible to a wider global audience.

Volume 19 is devoted to the theme: Latvian tradition in international law. Concepts such as statehood, State continuity, State responsibility, equal participation in international decision-making and recently rule of law in international law and consolidation of legal regulation at an international level in different fields of cooperation, have been of relevance and interest both in practice and academic research in the field of international law in Latvia. The volume contains a selection of articles introducing historical and current research on these and other related issues.
Volume Editors: Olivier Giraud and Michel Lallement
Decentering Comparative Analysis in a Globalizing World aims to go beyond the traditional criticism in comparative analysis. It wants to shed new light on the question of comparing as a form of categorizing. In this perspective, three relevant dimensions to question the naturalized categories of comparison are mobilized: ethnocentrism, the nation, and academic disciplines. Based on original empirical work, the volume proposes to use comparative categories by mixing and shifting the analytical perspectives. It brings together contributions that come to terms with the historicity of the comparative method in the social sciences. It eventually deals with the key issue of comparability of various cases, in the enlarged context of a globalizing world.

Contributors are: Anna Amelina, Camille Boullier, Catherine Cavalin, Serge Ebersold, Andreas Eckert, Mohamedoune Abdoulaye Fall, Isabel Georges, Olivier Giraud, Aïssa Kadri, Wiebke Keim, Michel Lallement, Marie Mercat-Bruns, Luis Felipe Murillo, Kiran Klaus Patel, Léa Renard, Ferruccio Ricciardi, Paul-André Rosental, Pablo Salazar-Jaramillo, Stéphanie Tawa-Lama Rewal, Nikola Tietze, Tania Toffanin, Michel Vincent, and Bénédicte Zimmermann.