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Volume Editors: Elizabeth Cavicchi and Peter Heering
These essays draw on recent and versatile work by museum staff, science educators, and teachers, showing what can be done with historical scientific instruments or replicas. Varied audiences - with members just like you - can be made aware of exciting aspects of history, observation, problem-solving, restoration, and scientific understanding, by the projects outlined here by professional practitioners. These interdisciplinary case studies, ranging from the cinematic to the hands-on, show how inspiration concerning science and the past can give intellectual pleasure as well as authentic learning to new participants, who might include people like you: students, teachers, curators, and the interested and engaged public.

Contributors are Dominique Bernard, Paolo Brenni, Roland Carchon, Elizabeth Cavicchi, Stéphane Fischer, Peter Heering, J.W. Huisman, Françoise Khantine-Langlois, Alistair M. Kwan, Janet Laidla, Pierre Lauginie, Panagiotis Lazos, Pietro Milici, Flora Paparou, Frédérique Plantevin, Julie Priser, Alfonso San-Miguel, Danny Segers, Constantine (Kostas) Skordoulis, Trienke M. van der Spek, Constantina Stefanidou, and Giorgio Strano.    
This interdisciplinary volume of essays explores how the notion of time varies across disciplines by examining variance as a defining feature of temporalities in cultural, creative, and scholarly contexts. Featuring a President’s Address by philosopher David Wood, it begins with critical reassessments of J.T. Fraser’s hierarchical theory of time through the lens of Anthropocene studies, philosophy, ecological theory, and ecological literature; proceeds to variant narratives in fiction, video games, film, and graphic novels; and concludes by measuring time’s variance with tools as different as incense clocks and computers, and by marking variance in music, film, and performance art.
An Exploration of Feeling, Value and Virtue
Author: Yinghua Lu
Critically developing the Contemporary New Confucianism, this book opens a new horizon for the study of emotions and philosophy of heart-mind and [human] nature by focusing on the communication between phenomenology, particularly Schelerian phenomenology, and Chinese philosophy, especially Mencius and Wang Yangming. Such communication demonstrates how ethics based on factual experience is possible, revealing the original spirit and fresh meaning of Confucian learning of the heart-mind. In clarifying crucial feelings and values, this work undertakes a detailed description of the heart’s concrete activities for the idea that “the heart has its own order,” allowing us to see the order of the heart and its deviated form clearly and comprehensively.
In: Body and Cosmos
In: Body and Cosmos
In: Body and Cosmos
In: Body and Cosmos