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Abstract

In the etymological literature there exist two divergent reconstructions for the word group around OHG sahar ‘sedge’: PGmc. *saχaza- and *saχ(a)ra-. Of these two the former is nearly exclusively found in Indo-European literature. The reconstruction *saχaza- cannot be correct. This is obvious because of the forms found in the Romanic languages, that were borrowed from Gothic, a language that did not undergo rhotazism. The neglect of literature from the field of Romance Studies is therefore accountable for the persistence of a false reconstruction in Indo-European studies.

In: Amsterdamer Beiträge zur älteren Germanistik

Abstract

This article offers a descriptive account of body part constructions in Old East Frisian texts and analyzes the occurrence of dative experiencers in such clauses. This includes a comparison between Old Frisian body part grammar and its Middle Dutch counterpart, revisiting issues such as the antiquity of dative external possessors and oblique subject constructions in West Germanic. In presenting the data from a theory-neutral perspective, this investigation contributes to the study of body part grammar in Medieval Germanic in particular and to the growing body of literature on Old Frisian syntax in general.

In: Amsterdamer Beiträge zur älteren Germanistik
In: Amsterdamer Beiträge zur älteren Germanistik

Abstract

The language of the Malberg glosses shows phonological developments that allow us to position this language variety within the West-Germanic dialect continuum. In this article the author shows that the language cannot be viewed as Old Dutch, nor as the ancestor of Old Dutch based on the attested phonological developments, notably: the assimilation of certain clusters; the partial merger of Proto-Germanic *g and *h; and the palatalisation of Proto-Germanic *g.

In: Amsterdamer Beiträge zur älteren Germanistik
Author: John M. Jeep

Abstract

This study presents a first-time complete accounting and analysis of the alliterating word-pairs in Wolfram’s “Willehalm,” “Titurel,” and his poetry, representing the completion of a project to survey Wolframs’ complete oeuvre. Each pair is described philologically within the work in which it appears, relevant earlier or parallel occurrences are noted, and on occasion the further life of the pair is discussed. A complete listing integrates the 98 pairs from “Parzival.” This rounds out studies of the major Middle High German classical works of courtly literature, cataloguing Wolfram’s use of the rhetorical device following similar studies of Hartmann von Aue and Gottfried von Strassburg.

In: Amsterdamer Beiträge zur älteren Germanistik
In: Amsterdamer Beiträge zur älteren Germanistik