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In Necessary Existence and the Doctrine of Being in Avicenna’s Metaphysics of the Healing Daniel De Haan explicates the central argument of Avicenna’s metaphysical masterpiece. De Haan argues that the most fundamental primary notion in Avicenna’s metaphysics is neither being nor thing but is the necessary ( wājib), which Avicenna employs to demonstrate the existence and true-nature of the divine necessary existence in itself. This conclusion is established through a systematic investigation of how Avicenna’s theory of a demonstrative science is employed in the organization of his metaphysical science into its subject, first principles, and objects of enquiry. The book examines the essential role the first principles as primary notions and primary hypotheses play in the central argument of Avicenna’s metaphysics.
Author: Jacob Langeloh
In Erzählte Argumente. Exempla und historische Argumentation in politischen Traktaten c. 1265–1325, Jacob Langeloh describes how medieval political writers around the year 1300 employed historical arguments.
Scholastic authors are commonly thought to be oblivious to history. This study shows that they not only showed great respect for historical arguments, but that they also displayed a refined technique in using them. In addition to case studies ranging from Thomas Aquinas to Dante Alighieri and up to Marsilius of Padua, Jacob Langeloh also offers a functional description of both Exempla and narrated historical argument.
This is a thoroughly revised and expanded version of the first edition of the Arabic version of Dimitrie Cantemir’s The Divan or the Sage’s Dispute with the World (Ṣalāḥ al-ḥakīm wa-fasād al-ʿālam al-ḏamīm) (Iaşi, 1698), his first printed book, the earliest ethical treatise in Romanian literature and a testimony to his wide knowledge, reading, and proficiency in foreign languages. Completed in 1705 by Athanasius III Dabbās, Patriarch of the Antiochian Church (1684-1694, 1720-1724), the Arabic text is accompanied by the first translation into a modern language, English. Book III contains Cantemir’s version of the Latin work Stimuli virtutum, fraena peccatorum (Amsterdam, 1682) by the Unitarian Andzrej Wiszowaty (Andreas Wissovatius) of Raków (Poland), a chief representative of the Polish Brethren. Thus, in the space of twenty-three years Central-European Protestant ideas reached the Arab Christians of Ottoman Syria, by way of Greek and Arabic.
In: Dimitrie Cantemir, Salvation of the Sage and Ruin of the Sinful World
In: Dimitrie Cantemir, Salvation of the Sage and Ruin of the Sinful World
In: Dimitrie Cantemir, Salvation of the Sage and Ruin of the Sinful World
In: Dimitrie Cantemir, Salvation of the Sage and Ruin of the Sinful World
In: Dimitrie Cantemir, Salvation of the Sage and Ruin of the Sinful World
In: Dimitrie Cantemir, Salvation of the Sage and Ruin of the Sinful World
In: Dimitrie Cantemir, Salvation of the Sage and Ruin of the Sinful World