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Written in dialog format, Andrew Fitz-Gibbon’s Pragmatic Nonviolence argues that nonviolence is the best hope for a better world. Human violence in all its forms—physical, psychological and systemic-cultural—is perhaps the greatest obstacle to well-being in personal and community life. Nonviolence as “a practice that, whenever possible, seeks the well-being of the Other, by refusing to use violence to solve problems, and by acting according to loving kindness” is the best antidote to human violence. By drawing on the philosophy of nonviolence, the American pragmatist tradition and recent empirical research, Pragmatic Nonviolence demonstrates that, rather than being merely theoretical, nonviolence is a truly practical approach toward personal and community well-being.
The EU Party Democracy and the Challenge of National Populism
This volume aims to provide consolidated analyses of the 2019 European elections and explanations about the future of the European party system, in a context in which the EU has to face many challenges, including the erosion of electoral support for mainstream parties and the increasing success of populist parties. The structure of the book is designed to combine the overall view on the role of elections in shaping the future European project with relevant case studies.

The reader is given a perspective not only on the results of the European Parliament elections as such, but also on how these results are related to national trends which pre-exist and what kind of collateral effects on the quality of democracy they could have.

Contributors include: Jan Bíba, Sorin Bocancea, Dóra Bókay, Radu Carp, József Dúró, Tomáš Dvořák, Alexandra Alina Iancu, Ruxandra Ivan, Petra Jankovská, Małgorzata Madej, Cristina Matiuța, Sergiu Mișcoiu, Valentin Naumescu, Gianluca Piccolino, Leonardo Puleo, Alexandru Radu, Mihai Sebe, Sorina Soare, Tobias Spöri, Jeremias Stadlmair, Martin Štefek, Piotr Sula, and Jaroslav Ušiak.
This book constitutes a sociological research on the current “narrations” of the economic and refugee crisis which has mobilized all the aspects of social storytelling during the last decade, most particularly in the European South. Because the different (mass and social) media reflect the dominant ideas and representations, the research on the meaning of different media narratives becomes a necessary report for the understanding of the relation (or “inexistent dialogue”?) between official political discourses and popular myths (based on everyday life values of prosperity, mostly promoted by the mass culture and the cultural industries’ products). Despite the ongoing inequalities and difficulties, the contemporary audiences seem to counterbalance misery by the dreams of happiness, provided by this kind of products.

Contributors include: Christiana Constantopoulou, Amalia Frangiskou, Evangelia Kalerante, Laurence Larochelle, Debora Marcucci, Valentina Marinescu, Albertina Pretto, Maria Thanopoulou, Joanna Tsiganou, Vasilis Vamvakas, and Eleni Zyga.
Essays on the Political Economy of Late Development
Growth and Change in Neoliberal Capitalism brings together selected essays written by Alfredo Saad-Filho, one of the most prominent Marxist political economists today. This book offers a rich analysis of long-term economic development in the current stage of capitalism, the new relations of dependence between countries, the prospects for poor countries, and the progressive alternatives to neoliberalism. The volume also provides a detailed set of studies of the political economy of Brazil, tracking its achievements, tragedies, contradictions and limitations.

Abstract

Alligators were perceived as dangerous by early settlers in Florida, and they also reflected the untamed and potentially untameable Florida wilderness. By the 20th century, alligator farms capitalized on the thrill of alligator encounters in controlled theme park experiences. Alligators are tamed in the current farm context and valued increasingly for the products that can be derived from their bodies. This anthrozoological investigation of perceptions of Florida alligators explores how farms define alligators and why visitors might accept these particular constructed images of alligators, concluding with a wider view to consider these perceptions of farmed animals in relation to the idea of the nuisance alligator. The discussion is framed by multi-species studies that rest on notions of embodiment and attentiveness, which in this case push the importance of alligator experience and agency to the foreground.

In: Society & Animals

Abstract

We present the results of our analysis of the sentiments of guardians in Spain following the death of a companion animal, as well as their potential use of cemeteries/crematoriums, based on a personal survey that was completed by 197 guardians. Factor analysis revealed the existence of three dimensions. The first focused on emotional reactions following a companion animal’s death. The second considered personal relationships that developed between guardians and their companion animals. Finally, the third focused on benefits or value offered by a companion animal. Four segments were obtained by cluster analysis. The largest segment had the strongest intention of using/reusing cemetery or cremation services (3.2 out of 5). It was also the only segment which placed value on emotional reactions upon a companion’s death. The results showed that a strong bond between guardians and companion animals was associated with a higher probability that burial or cremation services would be used.

In: Society & Animals
Author: Amelia Lewis

Abstract

Attachment theory, proposed in the 1950s to understand the development of parent-child relationships, is often applied to human–companion animal relationships. I argue the application of this paradigm to test nonhuman animals’ social bonds with humans infantilizes mature animals and has a detrimental impact on animal welfare. The premise is that Ainsworth’s Strange Situation Test is inappropriate to investigate the emotional ties between domestic animals and humans. Instead, I propose an alternative theory, that dogs form mature social bonds with their guardians, and that the phenomenon known as separation anxiety is the result either of the frustration of mature adult group behaviors, or an overdependency fostered by the guardian. Rather than view mature dogs as comparable to human infants in their social relationships, we should perceive them as socially and emotionally mature at adulthood and shift the focus from attachment-based paradigms to the behavioral ecology and cognition of companion animals.

In: Society & Animals
Authors: Min Young Song and Jai S. Mah

Abstract

This article discusses the economic development of Belarus, which took the gradualist approach in transition. Rejecting the Washington Consensus—based reform, Belarus experienced a quick recovery during the 1990s and rapid economic growth during the early to mid-2000s. The government took various policy measures to ensure the structure of a centrally planned economy. These measures included price control, emphasis on the large state-owned enterprises, restrictions on foreign direct investment (FDI) inflows, and tariff protection. Facing limits to economic growth since the late 2000s, the government has undertaken liberalization measures including price decontrol, promotion of small and medium-sized enterprises, derestriction of FDI inflows, and trade liberalization. In the meantime, realizing the role of industrialization, it placed an emphasis on development of the manufacturing sector by lowering tariff rates imposed on capital goods. Finally, the article provides policy implications for the other developing and transition economies pursuing economic development in light of the experience of Belarus.

In: Perspectives on Global Development and Technology
In: Perspectives on Global Development and Technology
Author: Nikolay Gudalov

Abstract

In this article I aim to critically clarify the spatial dimensions of the notion of resilience, particularly in economic policies important for development. The EU’s policies towards Africa, specifically the External Investment Plan (EIP) and the European Investment Bank’s Economic Resilience Initiative (ERI), provide an empirical illustration. Within International Relations, theorizations have sometimes lacked logical clarity, risked overemphasizing the local factors influencing resilience, and undertheorizing the external ones. Resilience is not wholly determined at a given local scale. There are also influences external to the scale, including other resilience’s scales. There may be tradeoffs between scales. Building upon local resources boosts resilience, but understanding the local as decontextualized does not. External help to local populations and bearing due responsibility support resilience, but external interventionism and/or one scale excessively depending on another do not. The EIP’s and the ERI’s problems illustrate those visions of the external and local that affect resilience rather negatively.

In: Perspectives on Global Development and Technology