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In: Interdisciplinary Journal for Religion and Transformation in Contemporary Society
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Abstract

For the novelty, the research fields of Artificial Intelligence and Theological Anthropology are creatively confronted with each other, especially the emerging ideas of perfection, salvation, mind and corporeality in comparison with the verbatim meaning of theos and logos. For this purpose, both fields of research, which – historically marked – became virulent at about the same time in (ca. 1960s), are theoretically framed, systematically introduced, and classified. Afterwards, a text-critical appraisal is made based on current European institutional publications on Artificial Intelligence regarding concepts, representations and ways of speaking about the hu_man, about der mensch being beyond neuronal networks. Commonalities and challenges through the juxtaposition and found synergies are not only making a valuable contribution to subjecting concepts of hu_mankind for a sustainable relecture. Furthermore, it provides relevant insights and findings about the positioning of the new technology within (ethical) discourses about human dignity and rights, as well philosophical debates about freedom.

Open Access
In: Interdisciplinary Journal for Religion and Transformation in Contemporary Society
Reihe A: Quellentexte zur Geschichte des Katholizismus
Series Editor:
Die Reihe ist abgeschlossen

Abstract

This article argues that the lack of comprehensive scholarly treatments of how the OT speaks about God’s knowability has to do with the complexity of the topic and the diversity of how the OT addresses it. It shows the diverse ways of how previous scholars have approached the OT statements and assumptions about God’s knowability (and the knowledge of God), clarifies how these statements and assumptions are related to each other, and gives some ideas about possible directions of future research.

Open Access
In: Interdisciplinary Journal for Religion and Transformation in Contemporary Society

Abstract

The article discusses interpretations of the ladder image in Genesis 28:10–12 from the perspective of Austin’s speech act theory and the development of its symbolic content in Christian tradition. In particular, the contrasting interpretations of Pico della Mirandola and Martin Luther are discussed. A separate section is devoted to the ladder image in Wittgenstein’s ‘Tractatus’ and Schönberg’s fragmentary oratorio ‘Die Jakobsleiter’.

Open Access
In: Interdisciplinary Journal for Religion and Transformation in Contemporary Society
Author:

Abstract

In John 20:11–18, Mary Magdalene meets Jesus after his death. She turns around twice, a double gesture that has puzzled New Testament scholars. In this article, I offer a performative reading of Mary Magdalene’s turns based on Judith Butler’s theory of gesture and the literary inventory of ancient recognition scenes. I argue that the double gesture does not emphasize the difference between a physical and an inner status of recognition. Instead, it is conceived as a non-identical repetition or quotation. It points to other turnings and other duplicities. Both turns are part of a performative process that unfolds the new identities of the main characters after their separation. Mary is not portrayed as a misunderstanding disciple who needs two turns to recognize Jesus, but as part of a reciprocal process that mirrors Jesus’ double appearance and the text’s double layers of meaning.

Open Access
In: Interdisciplinary Journal for Religion and Transformation in Contemporary Society

Abstract

The study transcends borders to challenge conventional narratives about religious tolerance and fundamentalism. Leveraging a Fuzzy-Hybrid Approach, we delve into the multifaceted realities of eight diverse nations: Germany, Cyprus, the United States, Lebanon, Palestine, Israel, Turkey, and Kenya. Our innovative analysis unveils surprising complexities, shattering stereotypes and painting a nuanced picture of religious beliefs. Germany emerges as a beacon of tolerance, boasting the highest tolerance levels with the lowest fundamentalism. However, the stark reality for citizens of Lebanon, Kenya, and Palestine reveals a landscape of lower tolerance and higher fundamentalism. This study delves deeper, using quantile regression models to expose the intricate interplay between religious tolerance, individual socioeconomic factors like education and religious discrimination, and even views on the death penalty. Our findings challenge simplistic assumptions, revealing intricate relationships between tolerance and fundamentalism across diverse contexts.

Open Access
In: Interdisciplinary Journal for Religion and Transformation in Contemporary Society