Browse results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 36,490 items for :

  • Brill | Fink x
  • Search level: Chapters/Articles x
Clear All
In: Philosophie des Sehens
In: Philosophie des Sehens
In: Philosophie des Sehens
In: Philosophie des Sehens
In: Philosophie des Sehens
In: Philosophie des Sehens
In: Philosophie des Sehens

Abstract

Rudolf Pannwitz (27 May 1881–23 March 1969) is an almost forgotten 20th century author. The Dionysian Tragedies (Dionysische Tragödien), published in 1913, refers in its title to the inspiration for the five plays: Nietzsche’s Birth of Tragedy (Geburt der Tragödie, 1872). Among the Dionysian tragedies, The Liberation of Oedipus. A dionysian picture (Die Befreiung des Oidipus. Ein dionysisches Bild) has the most points of contact with Nietzsche’s work. Against the background of the ancient discussion of the Dionysian and the dithyrambic and Nietzsche’s Birth of Tragedy, the article interprets Die Befreiung des Oidipus as a dramatisation of Nietzsche’s understanding of the Dionysian.

In: Poetica
Free access
In: Poetica
Author:

Abstract

From the point of view of temporality, Shakespeare’s tragedy of Hamlet falls into two parts. The first sequence, leading from the ghost’s appearance to the Mousetrap, stages – in its manifold soliloquies and monologues slowly and painfully exploring the protagonist’s conscience – Hamlet’s inexorable inner search for truth so as to be able to legitimize his ‘sovereign’ right to act. This is what is read as a programmatic ‘interiorisation’ of structural violence. The second sequence, leading from Hamlet’s authorisation to act to his unfortunate and untimely death, pursues the contingent asynchronicities between the right to take revenge and the continuous (ironical) denial of an appropriate situation for its necessary perpetration. This is in turn seen as a showcased ‘precarity’ of revenge. Both sequences show a marked dependency on a new, linear conceptualization of time: in both sequentially accepting and denying the right to revenge, they aesthetically negotiate the observable early modern shift in temporality from a cyclical ‘guarantee’ of a return to the invariable (and in this sense atemporal) ‘same’, to open and at times self-contradictory linear processes of being bent on the production/realization of results and, hence, of (personally) having to ‘find out’ and act.

Open Access
In: Poetica