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Czesław Porębski

This book offers a synoptic introduction to an important chapter of Polish 20th century philosophy, by introducing the studies of Kazimierz Twardowski, Tadeusz Czeżowski, Tadeusz Kotarbiński, Władysław Tatarkiewicz, Roman Ingarden, Henryk Elzenberg, Maria Ossowska, and Józef Maria Bocheński and how they contributed to value theory, ethics and aesthetics. These philosophers differed in their more definite interests, methodological approaches, and main results and yet their investigations share a number of characteristic features. Questions of value, considered as extremely vital, are treated with care and precision. In spite of the richness of their insights and an impressive number of detailed results these philosophers refrain from hasty conclusions, trying here, as elsewhere, to conduct their studies in an intellectually and morally responsible way.

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Edited by Franck Lihoreau

This special volume of Grazer Philosophische Studien features twelve original essays on the relationship between knowledge and questions, a topic of utmost importance to epistemology, philosophical logic, and the philosophy of language. It raises a great deal of issues in each of these fields and at their intersection, bearing, inter alia, on the theory of rational deliberation and inquiry, pragmatism and virtue epistemology, the problems of scepticism and epistemic justification, the theory of assertion, the possibility of deductive knowledge, the semantics and pragmatics of knowledge ascriptions, the factivity of knowledge, the analysis of concealed questions and embedded interrogative clauses, propositional attitudes and two-dimensional semantics, contextualism and contrastivism, the distinction between knowledge-that and knowledge-how, the nature of philosophical knowledge, and the problem of epistemic value. Addressing these as well as many other importantly related issues, the papers in the volume jointly contribute to giving an overview of the current state of the debates on the topic, and a sense of the directions in which philosophical research on knowledge and questions is currently heading.

The Secret Agent

Centennial Essays

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Edited by Allan H. Simmons and J.H. Stape

This collection of thirteen essays by writers from several countries lavishly celebrates the centenary of the publication of Conrad’s The Secret Agent. It reconsiders one of Conrad’s most important political novels from a variety of critical perspectives and presents a stimulating documentary section as well as specially commissioned maps and new contextualizing illustrations. Much new information is provided on the novel’s sources, and the work is placed in new several contexts. The volume is essential reading on this novel both for students studying it as a set text as well as for scholars of the late-Victorian and early Modernist periods.

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Edited by Vera Kalitzkus and Peter L. Twohig

Biomedicine is the dominant organizing framework of modern medicine but it is not the only lens through which health, illness and disease can be understood. This interdisciplinary collection of essays brings together scholars from around the world who seek to probe the boundaries of biomedicine. This book is the outcome of the third global conference on Making Sense of: Health, Illness and Disease, held at St Catherine's College, Oxford, in July 2004. The papers selected for this volume take a variety of theoretical positions but share an interest in the social study of health, illness and disease. They consider how biomedicine is a cultural system and is imbued with other meanings and that a full exploration of health, illness and disease requires a variety of perspectives, including those of social scientists, humanists and practicing clinicians.
This volume will be of interest to students, researchers and health care providers who wish to gain insight into the many ways through which we can understand health, illness and disease.

It has been brought to our attention that in a chapter in this volume
“The Communication of Diagnostic Information by Doctors to Patients in the Consultation” By Peter J. Schulz
direct reference and citation of the works of other scholars is often inconsistent and in some cases totally lacking. While we do not believe that it was the intention of the author of the article to misappropriate other persons’ material, we do admit that the chapter does not meet standards currently expected of an academic publication. We regret any misappropriation of another author's language, thoughts, ideas, or expressions in our publications and will remain vigilant to prevent this recurring in the future. We give notice that the chapter has been retracted and will not appear in any future editions of the book.

Brill, January 2016

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Edited by Antoinette Renouf and Andrew Kehoe

This volume is witness to a spirited and fruitful period in the evolution of corpus linguistics. In twenty-two articles written by established corpus linguists, members of the ICAME (International Computer Archive of Modern and Mediaeval English) association, this new volume brings the reader up to date with the cycle of activities which make up this field of study as it is today, dealing with corpus creation, language varieties, diachronic corpus study from the past to present, present-day synchronic corpus study, the web as corpus, and corpus linguistics and grammatical theory. It thus serves as a valuable guide to the state of the art for linguistic researchers, teachers and language learners of all persuasions.
After over twenty years of evolution, corpus linguistics has matured, incorporating nowadays not just small, medium and large primary corpus building but also specialised and multi-dimensional secondary corpus building; not just corpus analysis, but also corpus evaluation; not just an initial application of theory, but self-reflection and a new concern with theory in the light of experience.
The volume also highlights the growing emphasis on language as a changing phenomenon, both in terms of established historical study and the newer short-range diachronic study of 20th century and current English; and the growing area of overlap between these two.
Another section of the volume illustrates the recent changes in the definition of ‘corpus’ which have come about due to the emergence of new technologies and in particular of the availability of texts on the world wide web.
The volume culminates in the contributions by a group of corpus grammarians to a timely and novel discussion panel on the relationship between corpus linguistics and grammatical theory.

The Curve of the Sacred

An Exploration of Human Spirituality

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Constantin V. Ponomareff and Kenneth A. Bryson

This interdisciplinary book examines the nature of spirituality and the role it plays in the search for meaning. Spirituality is a loving tendency towards the sacred. In a secular environment, the sacred is taken to be a power greater than self. In a religious environment, the Sacred refers to God, or Higher Power. The book examines the developments of the s/Sacred in great works of art and literature, as well as in medicine, theology, psychology, philosophy, and religion. Spirituality also functions as an unloving tendency towards disunity, or a force for evil.
The first part of the book examines the ways of the spiritual as a force for good and evil. We have just witnessed one of the bloodiest centuries in human history. The experience of two World Wars leaves a legacy of brokenness: “Where Nossack’s reminiscences bore poetic, compassionate, and personal witness to the disaster, Eliot’s poetry reads more like a sacred and religious poem taking contemporary Western European civilization to task—much like the biblical prophets of old—for its spiritual bankruptcy.” Albert Einstein, Edvard Munch’s Madonna, and Carl Jung’s ‘unconscious’ touch the curve of the Sacred in more promising places.
The second part examines how the search for meaning works. The distinction between being human and being a person plays a central role in the life of the spiritual; “…the spiritual is manifest in the activities taking place in the central self. The central self is the locus of all thoughts, feelings, acts of reason and judgment, conscious and unconscious processes alike. The central self is the place where social relationships and environmental relationships are processed. The essential feature of the central self is that it does not exist outside these processes.” The same spiritual energies that light up great works of art also light up our destructive side, only the associations’ change.

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Edited by Michael Kober

This volume is of interest for anyone who aims at understanding the so-called 'later' or 'mature' Wittgenstein. Its contributions, written by leading German-speaking Wittgenstein-scholars like Hans Sluga, Hans-Johann Glock, Joachim Schulte, Eike von Savigny, and others, provide deeper insights to seemingly well discussed topics, such as family resemblance, Übersicht (perspicuous representation), religion, or grammar, or they explain in an eye-opening fashion hitherto enigmatic expressions of Wittgenstein, such as 'The pneumatic conception of thought' (PI §109), 'A mathematical proof must be surveyable' (RFM III §1), or 'On this a curious remark by H. Newman' (OC §1).

Disclosing Intertextualities

The Stories, Plays, and Novels of Susan Glaspell

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Edited by Martha C. Carpentier and Barbara Ozieblo

For the first time, this volume brings together essays by feminist, Americanist, and theater scholars who apply a variety of sophisticated critical approaches to Susan Glaspell’s entire oeuvre. Glaspell’s one-act play, “Trifles,” and the short story that she constructed from it, “A Jury of Her Peers,” have drawn the attention of many feminist critics, but the rest of her writing—the short stories, plays and novels—is largely unknown. The essays gathered here will allow students of literature, women’s studies and theater studies an insight into the variety and scope of her oeuvre.
Glaspell’s political and literary thinking was radicalized by the turbulent Greenwich Village environment of the first decades of the twentieth century, by progressive-era social movements and by modernist literary and theatrical innovation. The focus of Glaspell studies has, till recently, been dominated by the feminist imperative to recover a canon of silenced women writers and, in particular, to restore Glaspell to her rightful place in American drama. Transcending the limitations generated by such a specific agenda, the contributors to this volume approach Glaspell’s work as a dialogic intersection of genres, texts, and cultural phenomena—a method that is particularly apt for Glaspell, who moved between genres with a unique fluidity, creating such modernist masterpieces as The Verge or Brook Evans. This volume establishes Glaspell’s work as an “intersection of textual surfaces,” resulting for the first time in the complex aesthetic appreciation that her varied life’s work merits.

From Surrealism to Less-Exquisite Cadavers

Léo Malet and the Evolution of the French Roman Noir

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Michelle Emanuel

Les nouveaux mystères de Paris (1954-1959), Léo Malet’s fifteen-novel detective series inspired by Eugène Sue’s nineteenth-century feuilleton, almost achieved the goal of setting a mystery in each of the twenty Parisian arrondissements, with Nestor Burma at the center of the action. In Burma, the “détective de choc” first introduced in 1943’s 120 rue de la gare, Malet, considered the “father” of the French roman noir, creates a cultural hybrid, bringing literary references and surrealist techniques to a criminal milieu.
Michelle Emanuel’s groundbreaking study is particularly insightful in its treatment of Malet as a pioneer within the literary genre of the French roman noir while making sure to also focus on his surrealist roots.
Against the archetypes of Simenon’s Maigret and Christie’s Poirot, Burma is brash and streetwise, peppering his speech with colorful and evocative slang. As the reader’s tour guide, Burma highlights Paris’s forgotten past while providing insight to the Paris of (his) present, referencing both popular culture and contemporary issues. Malet’s innovation of setting a noir narrative in France serves as a catalyst for further change in the policier genre in France, including his contemporary Jean Amila, the néo-polar of Jean-Patrick Manchette, and the historical roman noir of Didier Daeninckx.

La Poésie du lieu

Segalen, Thoreau, Guillevic, Ponge

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Steven Winspur

On considère d’habitude l’exotisme de Victor Segalen comme une des tentatives les plus poussées de fonder l’écriture sur la découverte d’un autre monde, de même qu’on loue Walden d’Henry David Thoreau pour son évocation d’une vie simple et idéale qui serait à la portée de tout un chacun, à condition d’échapper aux règles et contraintes de toute communauté. D’un autre côté les poèmes descriptifs d’un Guillevic ou d’un Ponge semblent être ancrés définitivement dans une zone circonscrite de la vie quotidienne. Néanmoins, en examinant de près les écrits de ces auteurs on trouvera que l’opposition évidente de l’ailleurs à l’ici doit être reformulée et que la quête apparente d’un ailleurs chez les deux premiers aussi bien que son contraire chez les seconds – l’éloge d’une réalité bien connue – ne sont que les deux faces d’un seul et même projet: la tentative de recréer par le truchement de la poésie une nouvelle appréciation des lieux de la terre. Un lieu fait irruption chaque fois qu’un corps humain rencontre des corps environnants et il suscite chez le témoin d’une telle rencontre un sentiment extraordinaire de l’espace. Lire les quatre auteurs c’est apprendre à reconnaître ce sentiment, tout en appréciant l’espacement de sons, de lettres et d’appels que leurs textes nous proposent.