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Literature and History in an Age of “Nothing Said Too Soon”
In The Politics of Print During the French Wars of Religion, Gregory Haake examines how, in late sixteenth-century France, authors and publishers used the new medium of the printed text to control the terms of public discourse and determine history, or at least their narrative of it.
The creativity of the Renaissance ushered in new instability of discourse and a decline of traditional centres of authority. Gregory Haake shows that poets, authors, printers, and polemicists — including historians, such as Simon Goulart; the great poets of the time, such as Pierre de Ronsard or Agrippa d’Aubigné; or anonymous authors of polemical texts — rushed in to take advantage of discursive uncertainty to discredit their enemies and shape the meaning of history as it unfolded.
Goethe in 1827 famously claimed that national literatures did not mean very much anymore, and that the epoch of world literature was at hand. Since the turn of the twenty-first century, in the so-called "transnational turn" in literary studies, interest in world literature, and in how texts move beyond national or linguistic boundaries, has peaked. The authors of the 18 articles making up Literary Transnationalism(s) reflect on how literary texts move between cultures via translation, adaptation, and intertextual referencing, thus entering the field of world literature. The texts and subjects treated range from Caribbean, American, and Latin American literature to European migrant literatures, from the uses of pseudo-translations to the organizing principles of world histories of literature, from the dissemination of knowledge in the middle ages to circulation of literary journals and series in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries.
Contributors include, amongst others, Jean Bessière, Johan Callens, Reindert Dhondt, César Domínguez, Erica Durante, Ottmar Ette, Kathleen Gyssels, Reine Meylaerts, and Djelal Kadir. Authors discussed comprise, amongst others, Carlos Fuentes, Ernest Hemingway, Edouard Glissant.

Economic Imperatives for Women’s Writing in Early Modern Europe delves into the early modern history of women’s authorship and literary production in Europe taking a material turn. The case studies included in the volume represent women writers from various European countries and comparatively reflect the nuances of their participation in a burgeoning commercial market for authors while profiting as much from patronage. From self-representation as professional writers to literary reception, the challenges of reputation, financial hardships, and relationships with editors and colleagues, the essays in this collection show from different theoretical standpoints and linguistic areas that gender biases played a far less limiting role in women’s literary writing than is commonly assumed, while they determined the relationship between moneymaking, self-representation, and publishing strategies.
On the Fringes of Literature and Digital Media Culture offers a polyphonic account of mutual interpenetrations of literature and new media. Shifting its focus from the personal to the communal and back again, the volume addresses such individual experiences as immersion and emotional reading, offers insights into collective processes of commercialisation and consumption of new media products and explores the experience and mechanisms of interactivity, convergence culture and participatory culture. Crucially, the volume also shows convincingly that, though without doubt global, digital culture and new media have their varied, specifically local facets and manifestations shaped by national contingencies. The interplay of the common subtext and local colour is discussed by the contributors from Eastern Europe and the Western world.

Contributors are: Justyna Fruzińska, Dirk de Geest, Maciej Jakubowiak, Michael Joyce, Kinga Kasperek, Barbara Kaszowska-Wandor, Aleksandra Małecka, Piotr Marecki, Łukasz Mirocha, Aleksandra Mochocka, Emilya Ohar, Mariusz Pisarski, Anna Ślósarz, Dawn Stobbart, Jean Webb, Indrė Žakevičienė, Agata Zarzycka.
James Joyce and Genetic Criticism presents contemporary scholarship in genetic criticism and Joyce studies. In considering how evolutionary themes enhance the definition of the genetic method in interpreting texts, this volume presents a variety of manuscript-based analyses that engage how textual meaning, through addition and omission, grows. In doing so, this volume covers a wide-range of topics concerning Joycean genetics, some of which include Joyce’s editorial practice, the forthcoming revised edition of Finnegans Wake, the genetic relationship between Giacomo Joyce and Ulysses, the method and approach required for creating an online archive of Finnegans Wake, and the extensive genesis of “Penelope”.

Contributors are: Shinjini Chattopadhyay, Tim Conley, Luca Crispi, Robbert-Jan Henkes, Sangam MacDuff, Genevieve Sartor, Fritz Senn, Sam Slote, Dirk Van Hulle.
New Quotatoes, Joycean Exogenesis in the Digital Age offers fourteen original essays on the genetic dossiers of Joyce’s fiction and the ties that bind the literary archive to the transatlantic print sphere of the late nineteenth and early twentieth century. Availing of digital media and tools, online resources, and new forms of access, the contributions delve deeper than ever before into Joyce’s programmatic reading for his oeuvre, and they posit connections and textual relations with major and minor literary figures alike never before established. The essays employ a broad range of genetic methodologies from ‘traditional’ approaches to intertextuality and allusion to computational methods that plumb Large-scale Digitisation Initiatives like Google Books to the possibilities of databasing for Joyce studies.

Contributors: Scarlett Baron, Tim Conley, Luca Crispi, Ronan Crowley, Sarah Davison, Tom De Keyser, Daniel Ferrer, Finn Fordham, Robbert-Jan Henkes, John Simpson, Sam Slote, Dirk Van Hulle, Chrissie Van Mierlo, and Wim Van Mierlo.
In: New Quotatoes: Joycean Exogenesis in the Digital Age
In: New Quotatoes: Joycean Exogenesis in the Digital Age
In: New Quotatoes: Joycean Exogenesis in the Digital Age
In: New Quotatoes: Joycean Exogenesis in the Digital Age