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  • Early Modern History x
  • Brill | Rodopi x
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  • Brill | Rodopi x

Series:

Edited by Carme Font Paz and Nina Geerdink

Economic Imperatives for Women’s Writing in Early Modern Europe delves into the early modern history of women’s authorship and literary production in Europe taking a material turn. The case studies included in the volume represent women writers from various European countries and comparatively reflect the nuances of their participation in a burgeoning commercial market for authors while profiting as much from patronage. From self-representation as professional writers to literary reception, the challenges of reputation, financial hardships, and relationships with editors and colleagues, the essays in this collection show from different theoretical standpoints and linguistic areas that gender biases played a far less limiting role in women’s literary writing than is commonly assumed, while they determined the relationship between moneymaking, self-representation, and publishing strategies.

Violence de l'interprétation (XVIe-XVIIe s).

Le texte devant l'inquisition

Series:

Edited by Anne Duprat

This collection of essays aims to measure the minimum scope for interpretation, with reference to texts produced under absolute constraints: those governing the trials of the Spanish Inquisition, as well as trials for witchcraft and libertinage, in polemical writings during the French wars of religion, or in the words of common law convicts in Italy and England.
Written by ten specialists in Early Modern literature and edited by Anne Duprat, these studies examine the violence inflicted on certain texts via the act of interpretation, and the means of resistance used in response. The essays illustrate how the violence of interpretation can also create the conditions necessary for the text to take on meaning.

Cet essai collectif propose de mesurer l’espace minimal nécessaire au déploiement d’une interprétation, à partir de textes produits sous une contrainte absolue : celle des procès d’Inquisition espagnols, mais aussi des procès pour sorcellerie ou libertinage, dans l’écriture polémique des guerres de religion en France, ou dans la parole de condamnés de droit commun en Italie et en Angleterre.
Produites par dix spécialistes de littérature des XVIe et XVIIe siècle, ces études réunies par Anne Duprat interrogent la violence qu’exerce l’interprétation sur certains textes, et les modes de résistance qu’ils déploient face à elle. Elles permettent de comprendre comment cette violence, qui fait dire à un texte ce qu’elle veut, peut aussi construire les conditions de possibilité de son sens.